If future historians don't come to grips with Sinatra's bizarre status as a primary color in the postwar U.S. palette, they'll never make sense of the canvas. What's been mostly ignored in the obits is how even in his dotage Sinatra remained white America's last completely satisfying definition of masculine style--to somewhat disconcerting effect, let me add, since its underlying values had been debunked by feminism and Mario Puzo a quarter century before his death. Yet however much Frank the swinger's double standards tarnish Frank the singer's standards, no comparably compelling image of male conduct has emerged to replace it. Aside from fitting right in at the fin de siècle garage sale, guyville's chronic outbreaks of wistfulness about the Rat Pack--whose latest installment went into overdrive last Friday--testifies to the lack of alternative models that even most women, as pop fans if not politicos or human beings, have found palatable in the long run. Remember when Ms. was waggling Alan Alda at us like a remonstrating finger? So much for that.

Although a taste for coarseness sometimes denotes sophistication--Billy Wilder comes to mind--Sinatra was the flip side, revering sophistication as only a coarse man could. That would make him just another case study in horse-headed upward mobility if it weren't that, unlike most aspirants, he wasn't intimidated by prevailing definitions of sophistication; his version of classiness strikes a peculiarly native chord because it's an inventedclassiness, without a pedigree. One reason he did as much as Levittown to shape the mores of America's postwar middle class is that they'd never been middle class before. It took a peasant to teach the midcentury's new bourgeoisie how to comport themselves as aristocrats. So long as we're stuck with class systems, America's incoherent version is better than the coherent kind.

The voice didn't hurt, of course. Over the weekend, I called my mom to offer half-joking condolences; like the ones about Nixon, our running gags about Sinatra date back to my college years. She laughed, and told me she was reading in her garden with a stack of his CDs for background music. ''That sounds like a nice way to spend a Saturday,'' I said. ''It is,'' she said, holding up her phone to the speakers. ''Listen.''


A PERFECT DAY

By Touré

ONE NIGHT years ago, a woman I'd long wanted was finally coming over and I put on a Sinatra album. When she heard it she laughed so hard she went out of the mood. That was the end of her, and the end of playing Frank for company. For women there were Marvin, Barry, Prince. Frank was for the best nights--the alone ones. I had discovered him in Wall Street, when Charlie Sheen was just beginning to conquer Michael Douglas and Daryl Hannah and for one moment everything was as it should have been. In the background Frank sang, ''Flyyyyy me to the moon/Let me plaaaay among the stars''--and I understood immediately. This was the sound of insurmountable confidence and cosmic rightness. I never knew whether Nancy was Frank's wife or his daughter, or who Bobby was and why his socks mattered, or what Woody Allen's wife's mother had to do with any of it. I knew only that Frank had the sound of a man who would never lose. Could never. A man I could turn to long after midnight on Sunday, when I was all alone, the lights dimmed, steeling for another week of battle, and ask, What happens in the end, Frank? How does it all work out? And no matter how great the evidence to the contrary, he could convince me, ''The best is yet to come/And babe, won't it be fine.''

Last Friday, the last day of the 20th century, I got into a cab, one of those roomy new minivan ones. It was the hottest day of the year, and the cab was perfectly air-conditioned--the cooled air grazed your skin like on Sunday afternoons in the Hamptons. But we got stuck in traffic by Union Square Park. I rolled down the window and looked out at two very young girls, maybe seven years old. They had been roller-blading circles around the park and were sweaty and worn out. One wanted to stop, but the other begged for one more go. ''All right,'' the first girl replied brightly to her little bestpal, ''this is the last one.'' She paused and then added, without a speck of doubt on her soul, ''the best one.'' She said it with an unquestioning certainty that if they so decided, then life would play out that way, in the best possible way. And everything could be as it should be. As Frank would've wanted. And in that moment I thought that between these two little New Yorkers and this cab and this beautiful day, Frank's Homegoing Day, that maybe New York could be the greatest city in the world and could live up to being sung about by Frank Sinatra. But now I think maybe, somehow, someday, life itself will be just right and as it should be, and lifewill live up to being sung about by Frank Sinatra.

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