Y2Care

Millennium Movies Get a Second Chance



WAKING LIFE
October 19

Richard Linklater rewrites the rules and astounds again with this energized use of digital animation, which begins as a live-action, Slacker-like perambulation and ends up a fluid, computer-generated dream work. Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy, Steven Soderbergh, and Dazed and Confused everyman Wiley Wiggins are all in the mix.



IN THE BEDROOM
November 23

Hands down, the best debut feature of the year. Todd Field's adaptation of an Andre Dubus short story is a compassionate, beautifully observed study of bereavement, family dynamics, and vigilante justice. The actors (including Sissy Spacek and Nick Stahl) are uniformly superb; you won't see a more heartbreaking performance this year than Tom Wilkinson's.



GANGS OF NEW YORK
December 21

Scorsese finally gets to do late-1800s New York (shot in Italy), via Herbert Asbury's deathless 1928 volume about the Dead Rabbits and so on. Leonardo DiCaprio, Cameron Diaz, and Daniel Day-Lewis star; a virtual catalogue of old-Oirish pusses (Pete Postlethwaite, Brendan Gleeson, Jim Broadbent, Liam Neeson, John C. Reilly) join in.



THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS
December 21

After two astutely goofy, unexpectedly haunted comedies about friendship (Bottle Rocket and Rushmore), Wes Anderson plumbs a family of geniuses who include Gene Hackman, Anjelica Huston, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Ben Stiller. The all-star cast might indicate that Anderson has gone Hollywood, but more likely it's Hollywood that's gone Wes.


September


THE GLASS HOUSE
September 14

Teen adoptees Leelee Sobieski and Trevor Morgan begin to suspect that new parents Diane Lane and Stellan Skarsgård might in fact be responsible for their birth parents' deaths.


IRON MONKEY

September 14

This vintage '93 Hong Konger has already gone to video, but Miramax sees theater potential anyway. Directed by Matrix/Crouching Tiger choreographer Yuen Wo-Ping.



CHILDREN UNDERGROUND
September 19

Edet Belzberg's documentary about the homeless children living like rats in a Bucharest subway station threatens to make similar American docs shrivel away in horror.



THE AMERICAN ASTRONAUT
September 21

Cory McAbee's first feature, an oddball black-and-white musical space western in the grandest of punk-era, ultra-indie traditions.


BIG TROUBLE
September 21

Crime-caper farce involving a bomb in a suitcase, a 13-foot python, and a hallucinogenic toad. Barry Sonnenfeld directs, so it'll be cute and clunky.



GLITTER
September 21

Mariah Carey's aspiring-popstar '80s fable was postponed while she took like a minute off to eat ice cream and look at rainbows. All hope is not lost: A nervous breakdown, after all, could have turned The Wedding Planner into Spice World.


GO TIGERS!
September 21

Kenneth Carlson's love letter to a high school football team from a small Ohio steel town has gotten the best advance word of any sports doc since Hoop Dreams.


LIAM
September 21

Stephen Frears is only as good as his scripts, and here he succumbs to McCourt-atosis, visiting an Irish slum in Liverpool during the Depression through a kid's eyes.


SIDEWALKS OF NEW YORK
September 21

Ed Burns is back with his forgettable brand of trash-talking romance, this time featuring one-time honey Heather Graham.


TRAINING DAY
September 21

Rookie po-po Ethan Hawke gets trial-by-fire treatment when he starts work in the narcotics division of the LAPD. Denzel Washington gives noble speeches; Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre, and Macy Gray contribute wake-up cameos.


DON'T SAY A WORD
September 28

Andrew Klavan's formulaic page-turner becomes a Gary Fleder-directed formulaic thumb-twiddler, as psychologist Michael Douglas tries to save his kidnapped-by-a-madman daughter.


TIME OF FAVOR
September 28

Joseph Cedar's Israeli melodrama demonstrates un-Gitai market savvy by stewing up military strife and romantic tragedy.


VA SAVOIR (WHO KNOWS?)
September 29

Jeanne Balibar plays a stage actress who returns to Paris and puts her love life in order. Straightforward by Jacques Rivette standards, but a treat nonetheless—a spry, supple romantic farce handled with a lightness of touch directors a third of his age would kill for.


October


THE WASH
October 3

When Dr. Dre runs out of money, his friend Snoop Dogg advises him to get a job at the local car wash.


BURNT MONEY
October 4

Lovers on a crime spree, this variation based on the exploits of a gay Bonnie and Clyde who terrorized Argentina and Uruguay in the mid '60s.


CHOP SUEY
October 5

In his first feature since 1988's Let's Get Lost, Bruce Weber documents just about anything and everything that interests him, including himself, models, freaks, himself, movie stars, models, himself, and gay icons.


SERENDIPITY
October 5

John Cusack's slow drift into conventional leading-man terrain is troubling, especially when the vehicle (costarring Kate Beckinsale) is a high-concept heartclutcher about Destiny directed by Town & Country's Peter Chelsom.


WAYDOWNTOWN
October 5

Four white-collar Canadians bet who can stay inside their massive office park-cum-bedroom community the longest in Gary Burns's thin but drolly observed comedy.


BANDITS
October 12

One girl, two guys, two toupees: Bank robbers Billy Bob Thornton and Bruce Willis fall in love with their kidnap victim, Cate Blanchett.


FAT GIRL
October 12

The French title of Catherine Breillat's latest sexual forensics lesson is "My Sister!," which better evokes its bloody core: the hopelessly entangled bond between two siblings, one gorgeous and cruel, the other obese and almost frightfully stoic. If Breillat doesn't earn her shocker ending, she certainly etches the sisterly dynamic with ruthless precision, blurring the lines between love and hate until they become indistinguishable.

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