Rallying the Troupes

Young Directors Take Charge

A MAN OF NO IMPORTANCE
September 12
Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, Lincoln Center, 150 West 65th Street, 239-6200
Terrence McNally, Stephen Flaherty, and Lynn Ahrens adapt the 1994 film about a Dublin bus conductor who runs an amateur theater company. His ambition to produce Oscar Wilde's Salome, though, gets the local church authorities hot under the cassock.

THE PARADISE PROJECT
September 12-28
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, 255-5793
Performer John Kelly's new work is based on his fascination with the 1945 French film Children of Paradise. Kelly's multimedia piece uses two characters from the movie, as well as music by both Michael Torke and Radiohead (Torke and Yorke?). Full disclosure requires noting that the production will also feature mime.

TRUEBLINKA
September 19
Maverick Theater, 307 West 26th Street, 206-1515
The Twilight Series—a new late-night run of productions at Chelsea's Maverick Theater—kicks things off with Adam Rapp's rumination on religion and evil. Series artistic director Simon Hammerstein states he's looking for "danger, blood, and unforgettable theater"—drama as abattoir, we guess.

THE CHARITY THAT BEGAN AT HOME
September 27-October 27
Mint Theater, 331 West 43rd Street, 315-0231
The Mint Theater won themselves an Obie grant a couple of seasons back, cash to help them continue their mission of unearthing worthy but neglected old plays. Their 11th season begins with The Charity That Began at Home, the U.S. premiere of St. John Hankin's 1906 comedy. Originally produced by Harley Granville Barker at the Royal Court, the play concerns the unexpected consequences of a family's "all-consuming commitment to kindness."

MOVIN' OUT
September 30
Richard Rodgers Theater, 226 West 46th Street, 307-4100
"Six lifelong friends," the advance press reads. "Two turbulent decades. 24 classic Billy Joel songs." One big bullet to the head of theater.

MEDEA
October 1-12
BAM Harvey Theater, 651 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, 718-636-4100
Dublin's Abbey Theater brings Euripides' tale of motherly woe to Brooklyn, directed by Deborah Warner and starring Fiona Shaw as the woman done wrong. Folks with impending divorces should not bring the kids.

YELLOWMAN
October 1
City Center, 131 55th Street, 581-1212
Dael Orlandersmith's latest concerns an African American man and woman battling the racism they've inherited along with their varying skin tones.

THE ROMANCE OF MAGNO RUBIO
October 18
DR 2, 103 East 15th Street, 581-8869
The Ma-Yi Theatre Company dedicates itself to presenting work about the Filipino and Asian American experience, a project that won them a 2002 Obie grant. Their season opens with Lonnie Carter's new play about a lonely Filipino farm worker's pen-pal courtship with a woman who advertised in the back of a movie magazine. Loy Arcenas directs.

ROOM TONE
October 24-November 24
P.S.122, 150 First Avenue, 477-5288
For a contempo variety of religious experience, check out Elevator Repair Service's
new piece, based on work by Henry and William James. A golden bowl of American scenes, one hopes.

'CHEKHOV NOW FESTIVAL'
October 28-November 24
The Connelly Theatre, 220 East 4th Street, 414-7773
Returning for its fourth year, the Chekhov Now Festival will offer up nine different productions and adaptations of the good doctor's works. Among them: Gull, Ellen Beckerman's movement-based version of The Seagull; The Ghosts of Firs Nokolaich, a sequel to The Cherry Orchard about Lopakhin's destruction of the estate; and Moscow, a musical adaptation of Three Sisters in which three gay men trapped in a deserted theater have nothing but Chekhov's play to perform for all eternity.

DEBBIE DOES DALLAS
October 29
Jane Street Theater, 113 Jane Street, 924-8404
Back in college, a fellow student did her Am Civ thesis on the structural similarities between musicals and porn movies, how the songs in a musical and the sex scenes in porn played the same dramaturgical role. So it was only a matter of time, I guess, before the stage was graced with the musical version of Debbie Does Dallas, the modestly entertaining FringeNYC hit now engorged into a full-blown Off-Broadway production.

THE FOURTH SISTER
October 30
Vineyard Theatre, 108 East 15th Street, 353-0303
The Vineyard gets back to busi-
ness with Janusz Glowacki's spin on Chekhov. Three sisters in modern-day Moscow dream of freedom, "Hollywood style." Next up: Konstantin Treplev takes a meeting at Miramax.

GHOSTS
October 31-December 8
Classic Stage Company, 136 East 13th Street, 677-4210
Not busy enough with his season at the Signature, Lanford Wilson also translates the Ibsen classic for CSC. The production will be directed by Daniel Fish, who helmed Charles L. Mee's True Love at the Zipper last season.

UNITED STATES: WORK IN PROGRESS
November 8-17
HERE Arts Center, 145 Sixth Avenue, 647-0202
The Singularity troupe present the latest installment in their documentary theater project. Three scientists at MIT work to unearth the secrets of artificial intelligence—not the stoner kind.

LAPSE
November 8-17
P.S.122, 150 First Avenue, 477-5288
Ken Nintzel is the inspired kook who, a few years back, brought us Pageant, a charming and
pleasingly crazy piece about a contest to be the Virgin Mary. His newest production centers around a woman in a coma, as family and doctors try to "revive her and create the memories she's missing"—a process that somehow involves piñatas.

SIGNALS OF DISTRESS
November 12
Soho Rep, 46 Walker Street, 206-1515
The Flying Machine opens up Soho Rep's season with a multimedia adaptation of Jim Crace's novel about a group of Americans shipwrecked on a northern English coast in 1830. Expect the Flying Machine's highly physical Lecoq training to figure prominently in this tale of displaced, sandy Yanks.

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