Listings

At 9, Knitting Factory Main Space, 74 Leonard Street, 212.219.3006; Sunday at 9, Northsix, 66 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, 718.599.5103

Photo

SEA

This young gallery has a knack for putting together group shows of new and established photographers, and the current one is as refreshingly straightforward and spare as its title. It's hard to beat Stephen Shore's 1977 shot of a nearly empty stretch of Miami Beach shorefront, but Mark Wyse's picture of a solitary surfer in a mass of foaming water holds its own nicely. So does work by Shannon Ebner, David Hilliard, Katie Murray, and Pete Mauney, whose tiny video piece provides the show's soundtrack. ALETTI

Through September 13, Jen Bekman, 6 Spring Street, 212.219.0166


SUNDAY

AUGUST 31


Film

I AM CUBA

Longing for the tropics? Soviet director Mikhail Kalatozov's delirious paean to the Cuban revolution is as unexpected as a woolly mammoth in a coconut grove—a throwback to the revolutionary formalism of the 1920s. The movie is relentlessly visual, promoting a permanent state of vertigo, while memorializing, as if in granite, the hopes, hysteria, and Tropicana doo-wop of 1963. HOBERMAN

At 2, 5, and 8, BAM Rose Cinema, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, 718-630-4100

THEY LIVE

The Reagan revolution is masterminded by tele-canny creatures from outer space in John Carpenter's minor classic, one of the few pulp political satires of the 1980s and a forgotten precursor to The Matrix. No less timely today, Carpenter's acid-ripped Woody Guthrie worldview posits the most visceral paranoid theory imaginable for consumer greed, industrial pollution, and media narcosis. HOBERMAN

Sunday and Tuesday, Walter Reade, 70 Lincoln Center

Plaza, 212.875.5600


MONDAY

SEPTEMBER 1


Art

BLACK PRESIDENT

Fela, revolutionary inventor of Afrobeat, was "James Brown, Huey Newton, Rick James, Bob Marley, Duke Ellington, and ODB all rolled up in one black African fist," says Mos Def. But if the focus has been on Fela, the art in this exuberant homage—including Olu Oguibe's fiber mats, Odili Donald Odita's Afro-abstraction, Yinka Shonibare's headless brides, Kendell Geers's Chevron idol, and Alfredo Jaar's astonishing text—deserves attention, too. LEVIN

Through September 28, New Museum of Contemporary Art, 583 Broadway, 212.219.1222

Music

N.E.R.D.+THE ROOTS+TALIB KWELI+O.A.R.

How much Pharrell is too much Pharrell? Does such a conundrum actually exist? If so (read: "Frontin' "), the return of the N.E.R.D. project is the proper salve. Word is the Neptunes have been workshopping new material for their side project, something no one does as well as the Roots, also featured on this hip-hop-heavy bill (Talib Kweli and Kelis also appear). Token rockers O.A.R. will make even less sense than 311 did last year. CARAMANICA

At 8, PNC Bank Arts Center, Holmdel, New Jersey, 212.307.7171


TUESDAY

SEPTEMBER 2


Books

MARATHON READING ON AIDS IN AFRICA

I can't guarantee this will be a lighthearted affair, but the righteous roster includes such heavy-duty versifiers as Yusef Komunyaaka, Breyten Breytenbach, Sapphire, Timothy Liu, Meena Alexander, Daniel Nester, and Edwin Torres. All proceeds go to the Ghana Education Project. DE KRAP

At 5, Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery, 212.614.0505.

Music

THE SHINS

After a pithy debut of melancholic pop, the Shins return with the even tighter and more varied Chutes

Too Narrow. Bandleader James Mercer emerges from

vocal effects on songs that are neither garage nor

power-pop, yet still apropos; their sound remembers the

new wave that reared them and the '60s pop that honed

them. Great at 2002's Siren Fest, they'll be psyched to return to NYC. With Two Tears and French Toast. KIM

At 9, and September 3 and 4, Bowery Ballroom,

6 Delancey Street, 212.533.2111

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