Listings


WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 17


Art

JIM SHAW

Ranging across nearly 30 years and a freaky cultural landscape, this glut of drawings shows the range of Shaw's twisted imagination. Nothing—not sex, drugs, religion, abstraction, mushroom clouds, Freud, or rabbits on scooters—is sacred when he wields his skills in the service of mirages, dreams, stylistic promiscuity, or pure naughtiness. Should we call him our own West Coast Kippenberger? LEVIN

Through October 18, Metro Pictures, 519 West 24th Street, 212.206.7100

Film

'INGRID BERGMAN: THE SWEDISH FILMS'

Before she was our most beautiful star, she was theirs. Ten of Ingrid Bergman's Swedish films—including the original Intermezzo and her 1978 return, Autumn Sonata—will show on Wednesdays through February, beginning with her debut as a teenage chambermaid in the 1934 comedy The Count of the Old Town. HOBERMAN

At 6:30, Scandinavia House, 58 Park Avenue, 212.879.9779

Music

'BENEFIT FOR TREVOR SPARKS'

The list of reggae superstars who woke up one morning without the coin to buy "a next set of pants" is beyond lengthy. But the ailing Sparks is

not the only one to benefit from this event; the list of artists turning up for this event reads like a Who's

Who of reggae's fabulous '80s. Featuring Sister

Carol, Shaggy, Sugar Minott, Meditations, Yammi

Bolo, Frankie Paul, Red Foxx, and more. OUMANO

At 10, Club Cheetah, 12 West 21st Street, 718.941.4629, jammins.com

BUILT TO SPILL+THE DELUSIONS

Built to Spill are one of indie world's finest live acts, with all their minimal, tuneful songwriting and well-textured guitar lines taking flight in concert mostly because Doug Martsch is such a great guitarist—as good an indie-fied improviser as the Television boys. The Delusions do jangly indie-pop with a jagged, Built to Spill-ish edge in their guitars and charmingly homespun voices. Also: the Solace Bros. HOARD

At 8, through Saturday, Irving Plaza, 17 Irving Place, 212.777.6800

EDDIE PALMIERI

Pianist Eddie Palmieri has been around the Latin music block more times than most—and some even declare him to be the rightful heir to Puente's throne. Here he's working with the fiery 10-piece La Perfecta II, which is in the same mold as his successful '60s band. Palmieri always gets notice for his smart and sassy Latin jazz arrangements, but he'll knock you out with his assimilation bebop piano into the Latin context. HENDRICKSON

At 8 and 10:30, through Sunday, Blue Note, 131 West 3rd Street, 212.475.8592


THURSDAY

SEPTEMBER 25


Books

JOHN TYTELL

In Reading New York, Tytell writes of his own life in the city, and places it gently within a pattern outlined by Gotham's more celebrated immortalizers: Melville and Whitman, Poe, Kerouac, Henrys (James and Miller). Tytell, a professor of English at Queens College, will be joined by a mystery guest. PARK

At 7, Barnes & Noble, 675 Sixth Avenue, 212.727.1227

Dance

PATRICK CORBIN AND DANCERS

A dance for 18 women, many of them current or former members of the Paul Taylor company, is a highlight of this first outing by a leading Taylor dancer, who'll also perform two solos and show a duet for Michael Trusnovec and Julie Tice. Music for the evening includes Bach, Pärt, Dvorak, and two original scores by Berlin composer Marsha Groathe. ZIMMER

At 8:30, through Sunday, Danspace Project at St. Mark's Church,131 East 10th Street, 212.674.8194

Film

'HEDDY HONIGMANN: DIRECT ADDRESS'

Born in Peru, trained in Rome, and living in the Netherlands, Heddy Honigmann is a cosmopolitan maker of offbeat documentaries, including evocations of displacement and eccentric city symphonies. Her latest, Dame la Mano is both—an account of a Cuban restaurant in Union City, New Jersey. HOBERMAN

Through October 5, MOMA at the Gramercy, 127 East 23rd Street, 212.777.4900

Music

DIANE REEVES

Everyone knows she can sing with a range, imagination, and wit that place her in the great tradition, and with the release of A Little Moonlight (Blue Note), even she seems to believe it. As on the CD, she will appear here with her trio—Peter Martin, Reuben Rogers, and the excellent drummer Greg Hutchinson; she needs no more. GIDDINS

At 8:30, Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall, Seventh Avenue between 56th and 57th streets, 212.247.7800

Theater

'THE CITY'

Playwright Clyde Fitch (1865-1909) was the pre-O'Neill, whose tough-talking melodramas and sharp-tongued social comedies paved the way for the post-World War I explosion in American playwriting. Not seen here since its original production, The City is a famously cold-eyed study of a family climbing the urban success ladder, racking up crimes and dysfunctions as they go. Metropolitan Playhouse's production is staged by Yvonne Conybeare. FEINGOLD

Previews begin today, opens Sunday, Metropolitan Playhouse, 220 East 4th Street, 212.995.5302

'GOOD MORNING, BILL'

Pronounce my name 'woodhouse' to rhyme with 'good house,' " he said, "not 'woadhouse' to rhyme with 'roadhouse.' " However you say it, P.G. Wodehouse's teddibly British comic novels have been delighting readers for a century now. Less known, though, are his theater works, including this puckish 1927 item, never before seen in New York, which Keen Company's Carl Forsman is dusting off. Presumably he expects good houses full of Wodehousians. FEINGOLD

In previews, opens Thursday, Connelly Theatre, 220 East 4th Street, 212.868.4444


FRIDAY

SEPTEMBER 26


Art

JASON RHOADES

With its wild material excess and deranged metaphors, "Meccatuna"—a mad tangle of neon, donkey carts (real and ceramic), camel saddles, scaffolds, Geisha tuna cans, and life-size fiberglass donkeys—is his most irreverent installation yet. It's got giant camel-toe bones, aluminum vulvas, and a one-third scale Kaaba (Mecca's sacred cube) made of a million Lego blocks, plus a wailing wall and self-referential pea-foam leftovers. And each of the 550 neon signs is a vaginal euphemism. LEVIN

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