Shortlist


WEDNESDAY

OCTOBER 1


Art

GELATIN

Maybe only hardcore fans of this Austrian group will appreciate their silly museum installation behind a rough wall, which they call "more or less traditional." But with the exhibit's rug remnants, photographs of performances—grotesquely slathered with plasticine extrusions—and a huge tufted couch for viewing comfort, plus a dolly so you can slither into a makeshift cave, you've got to give them credit as avatars of the young devil-may-care sensibility. LEVIN

Through Saturday, Leo Koenig Gallery, 249 Centre Street, 212.334.9255

Dance

TERE O'CONNOR DANCE

If you were intrigued by that drifty plastic bag in American Beauty, you'll love the new Lawn, which has film by Ben Speth, electronically transfigured natural sounds by James Baker, lighting by Tony and Bessie winner Brian MacDevitt, and O'Connor's trademark passionate, deadpan choreography, "a non-didactic call to action." ZIMMER

At 7, and Thursday through Saturday, through October 18, Dance

Theater Workshop, 219 West 19th Street, 212.924.0077

Music

JASON MORAN

A gifted and original pianist, Moran leads a spectacular trio, with bassist Tarus Mateen and drummer Nasheet Waits, called the Bandwagon, which has a repertory that spans Schumann, Ellington, Byard, Muhal, hip-hop, and originals that—sometimes aided by musique concrète—truly hold their own. He'll be exploring works from a new Blue Note disc recorded last year in this very cave. GIDDINS

Through Sunday at 9 and 11, Saturday also at 12:30 a.m.,

Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, 212.255.4037

'SHOUT SISTER SHOUT: A TRIBUTE

TO SISTER ROSETTA THARPE'

Acontroversial gospel maverick, Sister Rosetta Tharpe pioneered rock guitar-hero histrionics in the '30s and '40s while singing and strumming for the Lord, backed by famous bandleaders like Lucky Millinder, Noble Sissle, and Louis Jordan. Tonight Tharpe's signature blend of swing, jump blues, and gospel technique gets righteously resurrected by Odetta, the Holmes Brothers, Maria Muldaur, the Dixie Hummingbirds, and Marie Knight. COOPER

At 7:30 and 10:30, Bottom Line Cabaret, 15 West 4th Street, 212.228.6300

Photo

KATY GRANNAN

Last chance to catch the segment of Grannan's terrific two-part show devoted to big color photos of figures in the landscape. Though Grannan is clearly playing off her subject's classical and romantic roots, her vision of the body in nature isn't conventional, sentimental, or cool. Standing, sitting, or sprawling on the grass, these young men and women seem at once shockingly undefended and fiercely self-possessed, all the more so when stripped bare. ALETTI

Through Saturday, Artemis Greenberg Van Doren Gallery, 730 Fifth Avenue, 212.445.0444

JAMES WELLING

Welling is a photographer's photographer, always exploring the nature of the medium. Though his work can disappoint, it's never uninteresting. In this group of truncated L.A. streetscapes, the large color pictures feel like empty exercises, but they're outnumbered by better, smaller black-and-whites that dim the SoCal glare with a moody range of gray tones. The effect is just right for shots of discarded carpet rolls, dusty parked cars, and a bit of reflected sky. ALETTI

Through Saturday, Gorney Bravin + Lee, 534 West 26th Street, 212.352.8372

Theater

'DREAM ON MONKEY MOUNTAIN'

An old man has an Africanist messianic vision in Nobel-winning poet Derek Walcott's 1967 verse drama, a touchstone of the black-liberation movement. The visionary in Classical Theatre of Harlem's revival, directed by Alfred Preisser, will be that touchstone of the New York stage, Obie and Emmy winner Andre De Shields, last seen strutting his African stuff in Broadway's The Full Monty. FEINGOLD

Previews begin today, opens Friday, HSA Theatre,

645 St. Nicholas Avenue, 212.868.4444

 


THURSDAY

OCTOBER 2


Art

KELLY HEATON

Asharp North Carolina artist who transplanted the eyes of 400 Furbies into an interactive wall now skins a herd of Tickle Me Elmos to make a giggling furry coat and trophy heads, in a workshop installation that's as conceptually perfect as it is wacky and extreme. With a wild video performance, a de-starred spangled banner, and the original Philip Morris auctioneer, "Live Pelt" is about the fur trade, slave auctions, and artificial intelligence as well as how toys are us. LEVIN

Through October 11, Ronald Feldman Gallery, 31 Mercer Street, 212-226-3232

Dance

WENDY ROGERS

Based now in Riverside, California, this veteran choreographer brings her bicoastal ensemble of marvelous dancers to town in a movement refuge, which creates webs of perception and relationship, eliminating the assumed opposition between urban life and wilderness. ZIMMER

At 8:30, and Friday and Saturday, and Sunday at 7:30,

Danspace Project at St. Mark's Church, 131 East 10th Street, 212.674.8194

Music

LUCINDA WILLIAMS+THE JAYHAWKS

Roots-rock stalwarts with folk-rock antecedents, both Lucinda and the Jayhawks have always shown just enough pop potential to be perennial Next Huge Acts since showing up in the mid '80s. These idiosyncratic acts have known wrong turns and moments of self-repetition, but regularly revitalize themselves, and are right now—Williams with riff-led raunch, Louris and company via new tuneful harmonies. It's why they last. MAZOR

Today and Friday at 8, Beacon Theater, 2124 Broadway, 212.496.7070

Theater

'JANE'

In this late bloom (1952) from the hothouse of S.N. Behrman, master cultivator of 1920s and '30s comedies of manners, a plain country mouse turns her city cousin's glam life topsy-turvy. Its rediscovery comes to you courtesy of Dan Wackerman's Peccadillo Theatre Company, and is by no means their first such. Leila Martin, better known as Phantom of the Opera's sinister wardrobe mistress, plays the reluctant hostess. FEINGOLD

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