Shortlist


WEDNESDAY

OCTOBER 1


Art

GELATIN

Maybe only hardcore fans of this Austrian group will appreciate their silly museum installation behind a rough wall, which they call "more or less traditional." But with the exhibit's rug remnants, photographs of performances—grotesquely slathered with plasticine extrusions—and a huge tufted couch for viewing comfort, plus a dolly so you can slither into a makeshift cave, you've got to give them credit as avatars of the young devil-may-care sensibility. LEVIN

Through Saturday, Leo Koenig Gallery, 249 Centre Street, 212.334.9255

Dance

TERE O'CONNOR DANCE

If you were intrigued by that drifty plastic bag in American Beauty, you'll love the new Lawn, which has film by Ben Speth, electronically transfigured natural sounds by James Baker, lighting by Tony and Bessie winner Brian MacDevitt, and O'Connor's trademark passionate, deadpan choreography, "a non-didactic call to action." ZIMMER

At 7, and Thursday through Saturday, through October 18, Dance

Theater Workshop, 219 West 19th Street, 212.924.0077

Music

JASON MORAN

A gifted and original pianist, Moran leads a spectacular trio, with bassist Tarus Mateen and drummer Nasheet Waits, called the Bandwagon, which has a repertory that spans Schumann, Ellington, Byard, Muhal, hip-hop, and originals that—sometimes aided by musique concrète—truly hold their own. He'll be exploring works from a new Blue Note disc recorded last year in this very cave. GIDDINS

Through Sunday at 9 and 11, Saturday also at 12:30 a.m.,

Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, 212.255.4037

'SHOUT SISTER SHOUT: A TRIBUTE

TO SISTER ROSETTA THARPE'

Acontroversial gospel maverick, Sister Rosetta Tharpe pioneered rock guitar-hero histrionics in the '30s and '40s while singing and strumming for the Lord, backed by famous bandleaders like Lucky Millinder, Noble Sissle, and Louis Jordan. Tonight Tharpe's signature blend of swing, jump blues, and gospel technique gets righteously resurrected by Odetta, the Holmes Brothers, Maria Muldaur, the Dixie Hummingbirds, and Marie Knight. COOPER

At 7:30 and 10:30, Bottom Line Cabaret, 15 West 4th Street, 212.228.6300

Photo

KATY GRANNAN

Last chance to catch the segment of Grannan's terrific two-part show devoted to big color photos of figures in the landscape. Though Grannan is clearly playing off her subject's classical and romantic roots, her vision of the body in nature isn't conventional, sentimental, or cool. Standing, sitting, or sprawling on the grass, these young men and women seem at once shockingly undefended and fiercely self-possessed, all the more so when stripped bare. ALETTI

Through Saturday, Artemis Greenberg Van Doren Gallery, 730 Fifth Avenue, 212.445.0444

JAMES WELLING

Welling is a photographer's photographer, always exploring the nature of the medium. Though his work can disappoint, it's never uninteresting. In this group of truncated L.A. streetscapes, the large color pictures feel like empty exercises, but they're outnumbered by better, smaller black-and-whites that dim the SoCal glare with a moody range of gray tones. The effect is just right for shots of discarded carpet rolls, dusty parked cars, and a bit of reflected sky. ALETTI

Through Saturday, Gorney Bravin + Lee, 534 West 26th Street, 212.352.8372

Theater

'DREAM ON MONKEY MOUNTAIN'

An old man has an Africanist messianic vision in Nobel-winning poet Derek Walcott's 1967 verse drama, a touchstone of the black-liberation movement. The visionary in Classical Theatre of Harlem's revival, directed by Alfred Preisser, will be that touchstone of the New York stage, Obie and Emmy winner Andre De Shields, last seen strutting his African stuff in Broadway's The Full Monty. FEINGOLD

Previews begin today, opens Friday, HSA Theatre,

645 St. Nicholas Avenue, 212.868.4444

 


THURSDAY

OCTOBER 2


Art

KELLY HEATON

Asharp North Carolina artist who transplanted the eyes of 400 Furbies into an interactive wall now skins a herd of Tickle Me Elmos to make a giggling furry coat and trophy heads, in a workshop installation that's as conceptually perfect as it is wacky and extreme. With a wild video performance, a de-starred spangled banner, and the original Philip Morris auctioneer, "Live Pelt" is about the fur trade, slave auctions, and artificial intelligence as well as how toys are us. LEVIN

Through October 11, Ronald Feldman Gallery, 31 Mercer Street, 212-226-3232

Dance

WENDY ROGERS

Based now in Riverside, California, this veteran choreographer brings her bicoastal ensemble of marvelous dancers to town in a movement refuge, which creates webs of perception and relationship, eliminating the assumed opposition between urban life and wilderness. ZIMMER

At 8:30, and Friday and Saturday, and Sunday at 7:30,

Danspace Project at St. Mark's Church, 131 East 10th Street, 212.674.8194

Music

LUCINDA WILLIAMS+THE JAYHAWKS

Roots-rock stalwarts with folk-rock antecedents, both Lucinda and the Jayhawks have always shown just enough pop potential to be perennial Next Huge Acts since showing up in the mid '80s. These idiosyncratic acts have known wrong turns and moments of self-repetition, but regularly revitalize themselves, and are right now—Williams with riff-led raunch, Louris and company via new tuneful harmonies. It's why they last. MAZOR

Today and Friday at 8, Beacon Theater, 2124 Broadway, 212.496.7070

Theater

'JANE'

In this late bloom (1952) from the hothouse of S.N. Behrman, master cultivator of 1920s and '30s comedies of manners, a plain country mouse turns her city cousin's glam life topsy-turvy. Its rediscovery comes to you courtesy of Dan Wackerman's Peccadillo Theatre Company, and is by no means their first such. Leila Martin, better known as Phantom of the Opera's sinister wardrobe mistress, plays the reluctant hostess. FEINGOLD

Previews begin today, opens Sunday, Bank Street Theatre,

155 Bank Street, 212.561.9635

 


FRIDAY

OCTOBER 3


Film

'41ST NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL'

Von Trier's Dogville, Van Sant's Elephant, and Alejandro González Iñárritu's 21 Gramsare the big attention-grabbers, but this year's edition is stocked with excellent small films—including Jafar Panahi's Crimson Gold, Barbara Albert's Free Radicals, and Nuri Bilge Ceylan's Distant—plus four standout docs and a sensational silent rediscovery in the Anna May Wong vehicle Piccadilly. HOBERMAN

Today through October 19, Alice Tully Hall,

Broadway and 65th Street, 212.875.5050

'SCHOOL OF ROCK'

Hurling himself into the role of pop pedagogue, Jack Black is hilarious—a fount of inane jive, absurd bluster, and banshee shrieks. Piloted by Black's endearingly obnoxious true believer, School of Rock navigates between the sentimental Scylla of Dead Poets Society and the cloying Charybdis of The Bad News Bears. Richard Linklater's most commercial movie is also his funniest. HOBERMAN

Opens today, Loews Lincoln Square, Broadway and 68th Street, 800.FANDANGO, ext. 777

Music

GRANDADDY+SUPER FURRY ANIMALS+HOME

Still wistfully strumming amid fields of Western windmills, Grandaddy's Jason Lytle continues on the new Sumday to explore the slippery-slope simpatico of humans and machines—commiserating with a CPU "on standby" and throwing in with "futureless" El Caminos. Melodic Welsh myth-twisters Super Furry Animals' Phantom Power conjures the Birds while engaging tricksily with world politics. Lo-fi indie rockers Home open. SINAGRA

Today and Saturday at 8, Irving Plaza, 17 Irving Place, 212.777.6800

'HONORING WES MONTGOMERY'

The fastest thumb in the land and the inventor or at least popularizer of guitar octaves, Montgomery was a marvel of the '60s, an ingenious original who secured a huge following by playing only the most superficial aspects of his style. Peter Bernstein is in the hot seat for this tribute, with an ace quintet that includes saxophonist Gary Bartz and pianist Larry Willis. GIDDINS

Through Sunday at 7:30 and 9:30, Friday and Saturday also at 11:30, Jazz Standard, 116 East 27th Street, 212.576.2232

R.E.M.

The beauty of R.E.M. has always involved this intense yet amorphous nostalgia. After more than two decades of rule as rock-kind's most consistently innovative great band (or vice versa), that nostalgia is suddenly earned, emblematized by a hits compilation (In Time) and their first arena tour in almost 10 years. Can we still love them if their past is longer than their future? Friday with Pete Yorn, Saturday with Sparklehorse. KAMENETZ

At 7:30, Jones Beach Theater, 1000 Ocean Parkway,

Wantagh, New York, 516.221.1000; Saturday at 8, Madison Square Garden, 2 Penn Plaza, 212.307.7171

 


SATURDAY

OCTOBER 4


Music

AESOP ROCK+EL-P

It's trite to call rappers bards anymore, but Aesop Rock is one of the few who genuinely live up to the designation. Though his rhymes are super-dense, they're far from cluttered. Instead, he's a supremely elegant deployer of words who understands that gaps aren't necessary if the feelings are that potent. Def Jux label boss El-P knows a little something about hurt, too. Also: S.A Smash, P.F.A.C., Hanger 18. CARAMANICA

At 9, Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street,

212.533.2111

 


SUNDAY

OCTOBER 5


Theater

'ROUNDING THIRD'

Two Little League coaches with conflicting agendas square off in Richard Dresser's new dark comedy, directed by John Rando, who may be assumed, after Urinetown, to know something about the genre. Since NYC already has one dark comedy about baseball, Take Me Out, the question of whether this one cleans up or strikes out may rest in the hands of Rando and his actors, Matthew Arkin and Robert Clohessy. We'll see if the critics play ball. FEINGOLD

In previews, opens Tuesday, John Houseman Theatre, 450 West 42nd Street, 212.239.6200

 


MONDAY

OCTOBER 6


Film

'THE ARCHITECTURE OF DOOM'

Kiss off Leni Riefenstahl with this brilliant Swedish documentary essay. Peter Cohen uses all manner of archival material to evoke the totality of Nazi notions of artistic, medical, and racial "deformity." As an argument, the movie is lucid and shocking—explaining the gas chambers of Auschwitz as the culmination of a campaign to "beautify" the world. HOBERMAN

At 8, Barbès, 376 9th Street, at Sixth Avenue, Brooklyn, 718.965.9177

Theater

'BECKETT/ALBEE'

Marian Seldes and Brian Murray are the secret ingredients justifying this curious quadruple bill: Seldes renders the haunted heroine of Beckett's Footfalls and the disembodied lips of his fiendishly difficult Not I; Murray contends with the jagged Beckettian syntax of A Piece of Monologue. Then they join forces for Albee's terse takedown of wedded bliss, Counting the Ways, while audiences count the facets of the actors' shared skill and magnetism. FEINGOLD

In previews, opens October 9, Century Center, 111 East 15th Street, 212.239.6200

 


TUESDAY

OCTOBER 7


Books

SUSANNA MOORE

Moore's gruesome In the Cut was a jolting departure from her three previous novels. And now for something completely different, on the eve of Jane Campion's film version of Cut: One Last Look, set in 19th-century India. PARK

At 6, Corner Bookstore, 1313 Madison Avenue, 212.831.3554

 

BARBARA NOVAK

Very early, I knew that the only object in life was to grow," wrote Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), one of two women in the Transcendental Club. In art historian Novak's novel The Margaret-Ghost, a professor digs into Fuller's full, short life, and finds herself as haunted as Henry James himself was. PARK

At 6:30, Lenox Hill Bookstore, 1018 Lexington

Avenue, 212.472.7170

Music

BETTIE SERVEERT

Never what you'd call dyn-o-mite live in their chanteusy heyday, Carol Van Dyk and her Dutch boys have been jamming ever since. Their songful 2003 album rides the kind of long instrumentals that promise a rocking show, and last spring that's what they delivered. Also: Apollo Sunshine, Folksongs for the Afterlife. CHRISTGAU

At 8, Mercury Lounge, 217 East Houston Street, 212.260.4700

 

THE MAVERICKS

Hallelujah—the Mavericks have reunited after taking a couple of years off. The country-rockin' boys are back as lively as ever, still adding Cuban tinges to their rootsy mix, courtesy of vocalist extraordinaire Raoul Malo's family background. The Mavs will undoubtedly be doing selections from their catchy new album, The Mavericks, as well as danceable faves from their eclectic past recordings. GEORGE-WARREN

At 8, Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, 212.533.2111

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