Listings


WEDNESDAY

OCTOBER 8


Film

'BUS 174'

Brilliant filmmaking—literally—José Padilha's feature uses a reality TV analogue to The Taking of Pelham One Two Three to illuminate an entire social order. People actually die before our eyes, yet the movie never has the exploitation feel of an amoral carnage-fest like City of God. Tense, engrossing, and superbly structured, Bus 174 is not just an unforgettable drama but a skillfully developed argument. HOBERMAN

Opens today, Film Forum, 209 West Houston Street, 212.727.8110

Music

DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER

The finest jazz singer of her generation is also the most entertaining, with her megawatt smile, theatrical flair, sexy affect, and improvisational brio, which extends to comedic raps as well as to lightning romps through "Cherokee" or "Cape Verdean Blues." Her recent album of Kurt Weill songs is a triumph, but you have to see her to get the full effect—one reason 2000's Live at Yoshi's is an unqualified success. GIDDINS

Through Sunday, at 8 and 10:30, Blue Note, 131 West 3rd Street, 212.475.8592

'HIEROGLYPHICS FULL CIRCLE TOUR': DEL THA FUNKEE HOMOSAPIEN+SOULS OF MISCHIEF+CASUAL

Back when it wasn't cool to get dropped from your label and go indie, the Hiero massive realized that that was the secret to success for artists with college pedigrees. Thus was born the underground, even if it hasn't always benefited these talented forebears. Nevertheless, Casual remains one of the game's most vicious spitters, Del one of its great eccentrics, and Souls of Mischief a crew that retain their well-earned earnestness. Also: Pep Love, Little Brother, Encore. CARAMANICA

At 9, S.O.B.'s, 204 Varick Street, 212.243.4940

Theater

'THE SOUND OF OCEAN'

Traditional Chinese drumming and martial arts meet contemporary Western image theater in this piece by Taiwan's U Theater, headed by actress-founder Liu Ching-Ming. The subject is that source of sustenance and, more recently, worldwide contention—water. As this is the company's New York debut, we can't tell you more. Just go with the flow. FEINGOLD

Through Saturday, BAM Harvey Theater, 651 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, 718.636.4100

'THE NIGHT HERON'

Two unemployed gardeners in the Cambridgeshire fens wait for job opportunities, not Godot; instead, a mysterious woman arrives to complicate their lives. Jez Butterworth's play, his second outing with the Atlantic Theater Company, is staged by artistic director Neil Pepe, with a cast that includes company regulars Mary McCann, Clark Gregg, and Jordan Lage. FEINGOLD

Through November 9, Atlantic Theater, 336 West 20th Street, 212.645.1242

 


THURSDAY

OCTOBER 9


Books

PAUL AUSTER+DON BYRON

To kick off the fifth annual CooperArts festival, Brooklyn novelist Auster reads from his work—perhaps previewing his December release, the eerie Oracle Night. His unexpected collaborator is genre-gulping jazz clarinetist Don Byron. PARK

At 7:30, Great Hall at Cooper Union, 7th Street at Third Avenue, 212.279.4200

Music

JEAN GRAE+CANNIBAL OX

If there's hope, this is it. Jean Grae continues to slyly insinuate herself into unexpected places (opening for Kanye West? You go girl) and bring brimstone on the mic. The mighty mystics of Can Ox have been slow to return after their debut epic, The Cold Vein, but have been recording new material that will doubtlessly secure their status as rap visionaries nonpareil. CARAMANICA

At 9, Knitting Factory Main Space, 74 Leonard Street, 212.219.3006

RADIOHEAD

No way you're getting into their Tuesday-night gig at BAM, so note simply how freaking heartening it is that the Best Stadium Rock Band Currently Operating is art-driven and audacious enough to be playing for Merce Cunningham's dance company. And that they have enough skepticism about the trappings of being the B.S.R.B.C.O that they've intensified their struggle against doing things the easy way. WOLK

Today and Friday at 8, Madison Square Garden, 31st Street and Seventh Avenue, 212.465.MSG1

Photo

LYLE ASHTON HARRIS

For this series of Polaroid self-portraits, the artist, wearing nothing but a jock strap, plays a badly beaten boxer. Open-mouthed and spewing blood, he reels backward, his arms thrown out wide, and looks at the viewer in stunned disbelief. If Harris imagines himself a martyr to his art, there's nothing romantic or redemptive about that martyrdom. But by standing his ground, however shaky, the artist pulls triumph from defeat. ALETTI

Through October 18, CRG Gallery, 535 West 22nd Street, 212.229.2766

 


FRIDAY

OCTOBER 10


Art

TOBIAS PUTRIH

This young Slovenian sculptor, who has shown widely in Europe, pits Frederick Kiesler (a rocking egg made of gallery cards) against Bucky Fuller (a geodesic trash-bag-tie ghost) in his first solo here. With a corrugated cardboard monument that slyly alludes to topography and cinema, and a classical ruin that's nothing but egg crates, eggshells, and slapdash paint, it's a tour de force of ingenuity and lighter-than-air weightlessness. LEVIN

Through November 1, Max Protetch, 511 West 22nd Street, 212.633.6999

Books

'A KENNETH KOCH CELEBRATION'

More new music in the language of poetry": Koch's summary of Marianne Moore's "To a Steamroller" also applies to the poetic career of Koch, who died last July. The event includes readings, screenings of films he made with Rudy Burckhardt, and, of course, music. Originally to be hosted by George Plimpton, the celebration will now be doubly poignant. SWARTZ

At 8, Miller Theatre, 2960 Broadway, 212.854.7799

Film

'KILL BILL VOL. 1'

Revenge, Quentin Tarantino reminds us, is a dish best served cold, and his movie-mad action flick is one massive icebox raid on every chopsocky spaghetti western yakuza blaxploitation flick he's ever seen. The struggle between all-powerful Bill and his betrayed Bride (Uma Thurman) belies a subtext the filmmaker is too cool to explore—which is why this fun, smart series of martial arts set pieces and sight gags feels a mite thin. HOBERMAN

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