Listings

Opens today, Lamb's Theatre, 130 West 44th Street, 212.239.6200

 


MONDAY

Black Burlesque (Revisited) hops to it at DTW (see Wednesday).
photo: Elizabeth Cerejido
Black Burlesque (Revisited) hops to it at DTW (see Wednesday).

OCTOBER 27


Books

TODD MCEWEN

A Californian exiled in Scotland, McEwen's written the quintessential New York novel—with kind of a strange title—Who Sleeps With Katz—packed full of italics and ALL CAPS—and sometimes ALL-CAP ITALS—lofted by acts of high-wire stream-of-consciousness derring-do—do people still use that word-phrase—?—and punctuational high jinks—dashes—not to mention heroic meditations on grub. A breath of fresh air, not to be missed. PARK

At 7:30, Barnes & Noble, 396 Sixth Avenue, 212.674.8780

Film

'WILD IN THE STREETS'

Back in the Nixon-'Nam years, everything was metaphor, but this 1968 AIP hippie dystopia seems more lifelike every day. A millionaire rock star (Christopher Jones)—it could've been a millionaire movie star—buys and bullies his way into the presidency and immediately imprisons everyone over 30. Expert guidance through the movie-movie then and the real-life now is provided by the Voice's J. Hoberman, whose new book, The Dream Life: Movies, Media and the Mythology of the Sixties, explores the cultural moment when cinema and life began earnestly commingling. ATKINSON

At 4:30, 6:50 (with Hoberman), and 9:10, BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, 718.636.4100

Music

GERALD WILSON ORCHESTRA

One of the last big-band legends, he started out with Lunceford, but really hit in the early '60s with a series of starry West Coast bands. His current record, New York, New Sound, is a glimmering reworking of his classic charts, and many of its players will be at this very rare appearance: Jon Faddis, Jimmy Owens, Dennis Wilson, Benny Powell, Frank Wess, Jesse Davis, Jerry Dodgion, Renne Rosness, Anthony Wilson, and Lewis Nash. GIDDINS

At 9 and 11, Birdland, 315 West 44th Street, 212.581.3080


TUESDAY

OCTOBER 28


Art

LESLEY DILL

Continuing to draw strength from language, frailty, and a will-o'-the-wisp sensibility in ways that rival Kiki Smith, Dill's work keeps developing in subtlety. With cast-paper fragments, a white bronze figure dehydrated by its text, and black figures emitting prickly words like porcupines, plus a tangled wire ghost and an enormous curtain made of 700,000 strands of white thread hung from wire text, it's a well-paced show. The words are from Kafka and Emily Dickinson. LEVIN

Through November 15, George Adams Gallery, 41 West 57th Street, 212.644.5665

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