Listings

Music

LYLE LOVETT

Personal turmoil's brought Lyle's themes closer to home in his first new songs in seven years. They tend toward the upbeat and nearly danceable, not the famously quirky and sardonic—with a higher percentage of outright honky-tonk and western swing than he's offered since his first records, labeled "country." His longtime core band will be on hand to do the fine new twang and pop true justice. MAZOR

At 8, Carnegie Hall, Isaac Stern Auditorium, 881 Seventh Avenue, 212.903.9600

Theater

'THE LADY NEXT DOOR'

A love affair between neighbors leads to increasing complications in Leon Kobrin's 1916 comedy. If that sounds like the setup for a British farce comedy, you know what they say: Think British, speak Yiddish. The latter is precisely the language Kobrin wrote in, and that's how the Folksbiene Yiddish Theater plays it, under Allen Lewis Rickman's direction. Relax—they've got supertitles. So go already and laugh a little. FEINGOLD

Opens today, Jewish Community Center, 334 Amsterdam Avenue, 212.239.6200

 


FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 7


Art

CHRISTINE HILL

In her last exhibition, Hill produced and hosted a TV talk show. For her current venture—the latest incarnation of Volksboutique—the entrepreneurial artist performs office tasks, develops products, and mans the reception desk in a fragmentary old-fashioned "Home Office," replete with wainscoting, wallpaper, steamer trunks, ledger books, and other irresistible vintage details. Is it art as life or social sculpture as theater? She calls it "an exercise in labor." LEVIN

Through November 15, Ronald Feldman, 31 Mercer Street, 212.226.3232

Film

'ANOTHER RUSSIA: A TRIBUTE TO LENFILM STUDIOS'

The Soviet off-Moscow studio provided a home for many less conventional filmmakers—notably the "eccentricist" team of Kozintsev and Trauberg, Alexei Guerman, and Alexandr Sokurov, during the silent period, the '60s "thaw," and the days of perestroika. This 30-film tribute spans 75 years, from rediscovered silents to Sokurov's latest, Father and Son. HOBERMAN

Through December 4, Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th Street, 212.875.5600

'IN MY SKIN'

In Marina de Van's body-horror tour de force—easily the year's best debut feature—self-mutilation is not (as in so many other movies) a self-esteem issue but an expression of existential panic and extreme corporeal alienation. Witty, beautiful, terrifying, at times almost unwatchable, it's as gruesome and inspired a riff on the mind-body split as we've ever seen outside the Cronenberg oeuvre. LIM

Opens today, Angelika, Houston and Mercer streets, 212.777.FILM

Music

BOTTLE ROCKETS

After a long layoff to consider their life options, Missouri's greatest alt-Americans have put together their sharpest album in nearly a decade, revising their lineup and folkifying their studio approach as they go. Live I bet they still boogie. Live you'll still hang on Brian Henneman's every word. With the Hangdogs. CHRISTGAU

At 9:30, Southpaw, 125 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, 718.230.0236

Photo

GERARD PETRUS FIERET

There's something alarmingly obsessive about Fieret's '60s portraits and nudes of young women, not the least of which is the eccentric Dutch poet-photographer's compulsion to scrawl his signature and rubber-stamp his name all over their images. This strange need to claim and disfigure the photos—along with the ruined condition of the prints themselves—renders them fetish objects, an impression only underlined by the dark, furtive, and fiercely sexual nature of the pictures themselves. ALETTI

Through November 29, Deborah Bell, 511 West 25th Street, 212.691.3883


SATURDAY

NOVEMBER 8


Theater

'ANNA IN THE TROPICS'

Because you always really wanted to know what might happen if somebody read Anna Karenina aloud in a cigar factory, Nilo Cruz's Pulitzer Prize-winning play will finally hit New York, in a production from Princeton's McCarter Theatre. Director Emily Mann's cast, headed by Jimmy Smits, includes Obie winners Priscilla Lopez, Daphne Rubin-Vega, and John Ortiz. Be careful crossing the railroad tracks. FEINGOLD

In previews, opens November 16, Royale Theatre, Broadway and 45th Street, 212.239.6200

'THE BEARD OF AVON'

If you're one of those snobs who won't believe Shakespeare wrote Shakespeare, Amy Freed's play will help to fuel your suspicions. But we sane people might have a good time at it too, given that cunning director, Doug Hughes, and a cast headed by Tim Blake Nelson as Will and Mary Louise Wilson as good Queen Bess. As Larry Hart once said, "She could not have been a prude or/She would not have been born a Tudor." FEINGOLD

In previews, opens November 18, New York Theatre Workshop, 79 East 4th Street, 212.239.6200

 


SUNDAY

NOVEMBER 9


Music

BLINK-182+BUBBA SPARXXX

This punk-plus-rap billing might seem a TRL-worthy novelty, but it's way better than that: Blink's brat-punk ethos has given way to mature emotional spills lately, and their snappy rhythms and unstudied tunefulness are thankfully still in place. Bubba's also downplayed his novelty appeal even as he's played up his redneck roots, and his twangy, eccentric flow is among the best the Dirty South has to offer. With the Kinison. HOARD

At 7, Irving Plaza, 17 Irving Place, 212.777.6800

KRS-ONE

You can say lots of mean things about KRS-One: He's out of step with the genre he's so integral to; he's a cipher to the young people; he's a bit senile, maybe. But here's one bad thing you can never say: He puts on a half-assed show. His back catalog is as energizing as Jay-Z's, and his commitment to stagecraft is damn near unmatched. CARAMANICA

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