Listings


WEDNESDAY

NOVEMBER 19


Swamp things: Tom Hunter's Reservoir No.1, 2002 (see Thursday).
photo: Yancey Richardson Gallery
Swamp things: Tom Hunter's Reservoir No.1, 2002 (see Thursday).

Film

'MIX 17'

Under the rubric "Resistance Is Fertile," the annual New York Lesbian & Gay Experimental Film/Video Festival presents the world premiere of Jonathan Caouette's autobiographical video assemblage Tarnation, retros devoted to experimentalists Marguerite Paris and Jerry Tartaglia, a Brazilian sidebar, a program of San Francisco sex worker films, videos, and many, many group shows of proud "barely accessible new work." HOBERMAN

Through Sunday, Anthology Film Archives, 32 Second Avenue, 212.505.5181

Music

KENNY BARRON

The greased lightning and romantic ebullience of Barron's attack long ago established him as one of the glories of jazz in so many different contexts that a discography would do a world of good. He returns with a sextet that has as shrewd a front line as you could want, as Ravi Shankar joins with Terrell Stafford and Vincent Herring; the rhythm section has Kiyoshi Kitigawa and Ben Riley—the equivalent of a Rolls Royce engine. GIDDINS

Through Sunday at 9:30 and 11:30, Friday and Saturday also at 1 a.m., Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, 212.255.4037

'FOURTH ANNUAL DJANGO REINHARDT NEW YORK FESTIVAL'

An irresistible tradition in the making, this tribute to the Hot Club magicians, Django and Grappelly, matches local luminaries with little-known (hereabouts) European wizards on guitar and violin. Among the more familiar names are Harry Allen on Wednesday, Ken Peplowski on Friday, and James Carter, who made one of the best of the Django repertory CDs, on Saturday; but it's the unfamiliar names you'll be talking about. GIDDINS

At 8 and 10, also Thursday and Sunday, Friday and Saturday at 9 and 11, Birdland, 315 West 44th Street, 212.581.3080

JAZZY JAY+Z-TRIP+QBERT

+THE X-ECUTIONERS

Scratch DJ'ing is sport—yeah, whatever. Watching these turntablists can be ESPN2-exciting, but it's typically more like the Discovery Channel—impenetrable, but fascinating. Jazzy Jay is one of the art form's pioneers, and S.F.'s QBert and N.Y.'s the X-Ecutioners have been responsible for damn near every major innovation in the past decade. Z-Trip is the populist in this crew, but he's not lacking for skill. He just uses it to rock parties, something that sometimes gets overlooked amid all the flying fingers. CARAMANICA

At 8, B.B. King Blues Club and Grill, 237 West 42nd Street, 212.307.7171

Photo

ERIC FISCHL

The subject of Fischl's mordant, modestly scaled color photographs will be familiar to anyone who saw his last show of paintings: a paunchy man and a slim woman who've contrived a strained, possibly matrimonial domesticity in a sleek modern interior. Made in preparation for those paintings, the photos have a similarly fraught vacuity, with moments of desperate coupling and stagy ennui, but the drama feels even more effectively compressed here and the sex more memorably poisonous. ALETTI

Through December 20, Mary Boone Gallery, 745 Fifth Avenue, 212.752.2929


THURSDAY

NOVEMBER 20


Dance

DURA MATER

Kriota Willberg's edgy all-female troupe, which keeps one foot in satire and the other in earnestness, celebrates its 10th anniversary with "Gala Lite," a "greatest hits" program featuring music by Brian Dewan, the Wharton Tiers Ensemble, and Scott Westerfield. Stage combat, pointe work, a Russian-peasant orgy, and more. ZIMMER

At 8, and Friday and Saturday, WAX, 205 North 7th Street, Brooklyn, 718.599.7997

NILES FORD

In a program dedicated to the late Rod Rogers, Bessie-winner Ford (whose résumé includes choreographing the WNBA's halftime show and appearing in music videos) and his new Urban Dance Collective offer the premiere of A Dream Deferred, which investigates cycles of war and racism through the lens of popular culture. Storyteller Marlene Martin provides continuity between the work's seven sections; music is by Björk, Marvin Gaye, and Nina Simone. ZIMMER

At 7:30, and Friday and Saturday, and Sunday at 5, and November 27 through 30, P.S.122, 150 First Avenue, 212.477.5288

Music

DEFTONES+POISON THE WELL+DENALI

The Deftones' new self-titled album includes the best metal and screamo singles of the year—unless, that is, you think of them as art rock—plus nine other grand, gale-force-guitar-and-stretched-vox mini-symphonies. Florida's Poison the Well have risked alienating metalheads drawn to their Slayerisms with Euro-style formal daring. The lady-led Denali's knotty beauty is skewed as darkly as that of the Deftones. CATUCCI

At 7:30, Hammerstein Ballroom, 311 West 34th Street, 212.279.7740

Photo

TOM HUNTER

This British photographer's New York debut combines two immensely appealing bodies of work set in the scruffy squats and weed-filled lots of East London, and populated with a cast of young locals. Like Justine Kurland, Hunter stages tableaux that combine elements of realism and romanticism, underscored in his case with references to Dutch and pre-Raphaelite painting. A woman reading an eviction notice at her squat window is illuminated by Vermeer's golden light and Hunter's benevolent vision. ALETTI

Through November 29, Yancey Richardson Gallery, 535 West 22nd Street, 646.230.9610

Theater

'MOMS'

America's first notable female comic of color was the sour-faced, joy-inducing Jackie "Moms" Mabley, who climbed past youthful misery and racism to be celebrated everywhere from seedy vaudeville houses to nationwide TV. Clarice Taylor, whose stage and screen career has been equally variegated, comes back to her Off-Broadway roots to play Moms in this bio-entertainment, directed by Walter Dallas. FEINGOLD

In previews, opens Saturday, Harold Clurman Theatre, Theatre Row, 410 West 42nd Street, 212.239.6200

 

 


FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 21


Books

'THE THACKERY T. LAMBSHEAD POCKET GUIDE TO ECCENTRIC & DISCREDITED DISEASES'

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