Listings

WEDNESDAY

NOVEMBER 26


Film

A trio with brio: Sylvain Chomet's Triplets of Belleville
image: Sony Pictures Classics
A trio with brio: Sylvain Chomet's Triplets of Belleville

'THE TRIPLETS OF BELLEVILLE'

Nemo and Looney Tunes notwithstanding, the year's most ingenious and original animated feature is this gloriously retro whatsit. Virtually without dialogue, Sylvain Chomet's infectiously scored saga of a kidnapped cyclist, his determined grandmother, an ancient swing trio, and an imaginary New York is one animation that never stops thinking about motion. It's nasty but droll, cheerfully grotesque, and the triumphant opposite of precious. HOBERMAN

Opens today, Landmark Sunshine Cinema, 143 East Houston Street, 212.777.FILM

Music

TEGO CALDERÓN

Puerto Rico's Tego Calderón blows Jamaica's Sean Paul away both live and on record with a dancehall style that easily blends salsa, merengue, bomba, Rasta reggae, and surprising fragments of zoot-suit jazz into the catchy mélange that kids in the barrio have taken to calling "reggaeton." Rapping in fluid Spanish peppered with multiculti slang—and sly bursts of incisive commentary that owe more to Che Guevara and Tite Curet Alonso than to Jay-Z—Calderón and his crew make good on the failed promise of Panama's El General, who became Spanish ragga's first street star in 1990. COOPER

At 8, United Palace Theatre, 4140 Broadway, 212.568.6700

P. DIDDY+JOHNNY VICIOUS

Let's get ill . . . and stuff. If P. Diddy can train himself to run a marathon in under six months and turn a group of rap nobodies into MTV-funded Billboard babies, there's no reason whatsoever to think his forthcoming dance album will be anything short of synergistic genius. Witness new friend Johnny Vicious, the kind of mega-club-traxxx producer who funks up U2 and works with, who else, Loleatta Holloway. Everybody dance now. CARAMANICA

At 8, Roseland Ballroom, 239 West 52nd Street, 212.247.0200

GILBERTO SANTA ROSA

In 1995 this most generous and genteel of Puerto Rican soneros headlined Carnegie Hall with the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra. Tonight he and fellow vocalist Cheo Feliciano stick more to their dance-band roots in honor of another Puerto Rican legend, best known for his contributions to New York's Latin craze of the '50s and '60s: bandleader-multi-instrumentalist Tito Rodríguez. COOPER

At 8, Carnegie Hall, 881 Seventh Avenue, 212. 903.9600

Theater

'FRAME 312'

Say "Zapruder film" to a conspiracy-theory buff and chances are you'll hear some interesting stories . . . which might be true. As might the story of Keith Reddin's intriguingly creepy new play, in which a woman who worked in journalism when JFK was assassinated unearths a reel of film her former boss gave her for safekeeping. Karen Kohlhaas directs the Atlantic Theater Company's production, with those two excellent actors, Mary Beth Peil and Larry Bryggman, in the leading roles. FEINGOLD

In previews, opens December 11, Atlantic Theater, 336 West 20th Street, 212.239.6200


THURSDAY

NOVEMBER 27


Art

'EVERYTHING MATTERS: PAUL KOS, A RETROSPECTIVE'

This material-based West Coast conceptualist, teacher of Jason Rhoades and the Khedoori sisters, finally gets his East Coast due. His 1969 Lot's Wife, a stack of salt-lick blocks, was conceived to be eaten by cows. Among his other radical works—toying with time, balance, space, politics, homing pigeons, melting ice, and light—is the legendary Chartres Bleu, a 27-channel stained-glass video installation that condenses 12 hours to 12 minutes. LEVIN

Through December 6, Grey Art Gallery, 100 Washington Square East, 212.998.6780

Photo

JAMES CASEBERE

Casebere's scale-model interiors, once humble, austere monks' and prisoners' cells, have become more refined over the past few years, but they remain haunted by history. His new show includes more flooded rooms in Jefferson's Monticello (note the play of liquid reflections) and a screened Japanese space with a marvelously incongruous hill of dirt shoved against one wall. This drama is nicely balanced by a return to austerity: a terrific Richard Neutra series that recalls the punishing rigors of modernism. ALETTI

Through December 6, Sean Kelly Gallery, 528 West 29th Street, 212.239.1181


FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 28


Dance

GEORGE BALANCHINE'S 'THE NUTCRACKER'

Celebrating its 50th year, this annual blowout by the New York City Ballet, featuring dancing snowflakes and warrior mice and anorexic ballerinas inhabiting Candyland, was the master choreographer's first full-length work, and remains the gold standard for Nutcrackers nationwide, retaining the power to delight and inspire, whether you're six or 36. ZIMMER

At 8. Also Saturday at 2 and 8, Sunday at 1 and 5, Tuesday at 6, and other dates through January 4, New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, Columbus Avenue and 63rd Street, 212.870.5570, nycballet.com

Film

'HUKKLE'

There's virtually no dialogue in this exceedingly curious, fiendishly clever Hungarian contraption devised by 27-year-old György Pálfi. Framed by an old man's case of the hiccups, and associatively edited for maximum shifts in perspective, Hukkle moves from barnyard frolic to sardonic murder mystery. The cartoon pantheism sometimes suggests an eccentric nature documentary (or a comic version of Humanité), but Hukkle is one of a kind. HOBERMAN

Opens today, Cinema Village, 22 East 12th Street, 212.924.3363

Music

FRANK MORGAN QUARTET

Three reasons you don't want to miss this: You don't often get to hear this radiantly personal altoist, whose '80s comeback was a benchmark of the period, introducinga distinctive, heartbreaking sound and lyricism to the Parker tradition; he's using the occasion to record a new album; he's got his powerhouse quartet with Billy Hart, Curtis Lundy, and the empathic pianist George Cables, whose touch alone is a thing of wonder. GIDDINS

Through Sunday at 7:30 and 9:30, Friday and Saturday also at 11:30, Jazz Standard, 116 East 27th Street, 212.576.2232

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