Unpopular Vote

A compilation of electoral college crash courses


Electoral College's Time Has Passed (site registration required)
Re "The Electoral College Does It Better," Commentary, Oct. 27: Writer Benjamin Zycher offers that the electoral college "occasionally frustrates the will of the plurality or the majority. But the founding fathers understood the dangers of direct democracy and struggled to create a system that reflected the will of the people while constraining the majority."
—Jim Corbett The Los Angeles Times, October 30, 2004


Electors Await Chance to Cast Final Votes
All the speeches and Republican boiler-room calls in these final days aren't really for George W. Bush.
—Mike Soaghan The Denver Post, October 29, 2004


Reforming the Electoral College (site registration required)
In his Oct. 21 op-ed column, "Electoral Fixes," David S. Broder discussed the merits and demerits of the electoral college and every alternative except one: the method used by Maine and Nebraska to allocate their electoral votes. Their method is to give two votes—those that the states get for their senators—to the winner of the statewide vote and one vote to the winner of each congressional district. This is superior to the winner-take-all rule or to direct election.
The Washington Post, October 29, 2004


Campaigns Covet 10 Votes That Really Count (site registration required)
Ten Minnesotans will vote twice in this presidential election—legally. Jeffrey Carnes and Michael Meuers hope to be among them.
—Brian Bakst Associated Press, as reported in The Miami Herald, October 29, 2004


President Edwards? (site registration required)
It's Jan. 20, 2005, and a stunned America watches as John Edwards is sworn in as both vice president and acting president of the United States. Impossible? No, nor is a Bush-Edwards administration.
—Stephen Marmon The New York Times, October 29, 2004


Measure to Split Votes Is Losing
Polls say 60 percent oppose amendment
The Rocky Mountain News/News 4 poll shows a proposal to divvy up Colorado's nine electoral votes proportional to the popular votes is losing popularity fast.
—Ann Imse Rocky Mountain News, October 29, 2004


Voters' Perspective Different in Altitude
Arm in arm, Democrats Ken Salazar and Mark Udall rush up a flight of concrete stairs Wednesday night to meet with a crowd considered tougher than a room full of GOP officials: college students.
—Karen Crummy The Denver Post, October 29, 2004


Pro-36 Leader Retains Hope
Consultant Ridder says measure is about 'stronger democracy'
Joanie Braden was deep into labor, nearing the delivery of her child, when she noticed something that years later would strike her as both odd and normal.
—John B. Meadow Rocky Mountain News, October 29, 2004


Electoral-Vote Debate Turns On What Gives the State Clout
With all the money and attention paid to the campaign to change how Colorado picks a president, rhetoric and sound bites have held more sway than the merits of the Electoral College system. Scholars and campaign operatives offer arguments on both sides.
—Chris Frates The Denver Post, October 28, 2004


Electoral College Fiasco Looks More Likely
The odds that Tuesday's presidential election will end in an electoral tie have doubled as the number of swing states has been cut in half, election analysts and mathematicians say.
—Joseph Curl The Washington Times, October 28, 2004


The Electoral College Does It Better (site registration required)
Forcing candidates to broaden their base reduces political extremism
What should an election system for choosing the president attempt to achieve? Certainly one goal is to reflect the popular will, an outcome that might (or might not, depending on how the system is structured) be achieved with a direct popular vote
—Benjamin Zycher The Los Angeles Times, October 27, 2004


Dividing State's Electoral Votes Would Cut Clout (site registration required)
Colorado voters have an initiative on the ballot to abandon the winner-take-all system, and instead divide up their state’s electoral votes to match the popular vote. So what would happen if we did that in Idaho?
—Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review, October 24, 2004


Voting No on 36 Will Shield State's Influence, Avoid Legal Nightmare
Have you heard the Yankees beat the Red Sox? You should have: The Yankees outscored the Sox 45 to 41 over seven games. But, you say, the Sox won the series by winning four of those games. Explain that to the supporters of Amendment 36, the measure that seeks to split Colorado's electoral votes for president.
—Ari Armstrong Rocky Mountain News, October 23, 2004


Electoral-Vote Debate Turns on What Gives the State Clout
With all the money and attention paid to the campaign to change how Colorado picks a president, rhetoric and sound bites have held more sway than the merits of the Electoral College system. Scholars and campaign operatives offer arguments on both sides.
—Chris Frates The Denver Post, October 28, 2004


Amend. 36 Stays on Ballot
A federal judge on Tuesday threw out a challenge to a proposed constitutional amendment that would change how Colorado's electoral votes are awarded in the presidential election.
—Alicia Caldwell The Denver Post, October 27, 2004


Tied Presidential Election Could Be Mother of All Messes (site registration required)
A freak tie result in the presidential election could mean the House of Representatives would choose the next president, a scenario that would favor Republican incumbent George W. Bush.
—Reuters, as reported in The New York Times, October 27, 2004


Examining the Electoral College
When Americans vote Tuesday for president, they are really voting for the 538 people who make up the Electoral College. Here are some answers to questions about the Electoral College.
—Emily Fredrix Associated Press, October 25, 2004

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