Top

film

Stories

 

Quaint Neo-Surrealism Buoys a Remarkable First Feature

No stoner reverie: No Rest for the Brave
photo: TLA Releasing
No stoner reverie: No Rest for the Brave

Details

No Rest for the Brave
TLA
One of the best French films of recent years goes direct to DVD. Alain Guiraudie's No Rest for the Brave is a deadpan, volatile shape-shifter that utterly defies taxonomy. Morphing from a sleep-deprived slacker comedy to a boho-rustic polysexual fantasy to a semi-slapstick gangster road movie, this remarkable first feature is perhaps best understood as an existential coming-of-age odyssey in which a young hero goes on the run from death, only to confront the inescapable fact of mortality. No stoner reverie despite its dream-within-dream fuzziness, No Rest doesn't so much blur fantasy and reality as establish a delicate, disconcerting tension between the two. The movie seems to unfold in a parallel universe, a rural France where sleepy hollows are named for far-flung metropolises, spelled to conform with French pronunciation (Buenauzerez, Riaux de Jannerot, Glasgaud). All the same, it remains grounded in a particular social and economic reality—the characters, as in Guiraudie's previous featurette, That Old Dream That Moves, have difficulty paying bills and finding work. Characterized by a complete absence of foreshadowing, Guiraudie's films are premised on the unexpected harmony between discordant elements: His quaint neo-surrealism reconnects a debased language—the bastard vernacular of advertising—to its political imperative.
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 

Now Showing

Find capsule reviews, showtimes & tickets for all films in town.

Box Office Report

Join My Voice Nation for free stuff, film info & more!

Movie Trailers

Loading...