Choosing Your Religion

Treatments that channel a higher power

Black smoke, white smoke, the world has a new Pope. Great. But as a lapsed Catholic and an atheist, we've never had much faith in organized religion. Instead, what we do pray for regularly are beauty miracles. With so much talk of spirituality, we've decided to dedicate our first column to our version of theology. How divine!

The good chaps at Britain's ghd (no, not GHB, though just as addicting) have spread their wings with the Urban Angels line, "a new religion for hair," now available stateside. With pious-sounding products like halo (a weightless non-silicone, non-greasy serum, $20), angel tears (a leave-in, replenishing conditioner, $20), and miracle worker (a fortifying spray for brittle or chemically treated hair, $26), ghd is the answer to our hair prayers.

If your body is your temple, then we recommend worshiping at the altar of philosophy. The aptly named miracle workers kit ($45)—noticing a theme here?—contains products for your hair, face, and body, including hope in a jar, a daily facial moisturizer with packaging that reminds us "science can give us better skin, only humanity can give us better days." Now that's skin salvation.

Angel hair: ghd makes heavenly products.
photo: GHD
Angel hair: ghd makes heavenly products.

In search of solace—and some healing hands—we headed to Haven. The Soho spa offers standard services like Swedish massages (half-hour, $65) and deep-pore facials ($110), as well as temptations like the hot chocolate wrap for dry skin ($110). Unfortunately, Haven didn't prove to be a sanctuary on the day of our visit. Remodeling in some of the rooms caused a bit of a ruckus—not very relaxing, if you ask us. One shouldn't have to wait till the afterlife to get some rest. We'll search for divine intervention elsewhere and continue to spread our beauty gospel. Amen to that!

 
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