It is also of course predominantly male. But this, too, must be understood in the context of England, which has produced a rock folkway without exact parallel in the States—the boys bands, with their all-boy audiences. "Quo, Sabbaf, and "Eep"—a legend you can still see on the backs of jackets—were and are boys bands; so was Mott the Hoople, the group Mick Jones used to follow around. This sort of fandom is clearly much like rooting for a football team, with the ominous difference that rock's sexual content—admittedly downplayed among the four boys bands I've mentioned—might be more sanely absorbed in a coed environment. Jones was amused that the Clash now seemed to be a boys band, and expressed the hope that the photogenic Simonon would break the pattern via the teenybop magazines—not so much to up the band's market share as to humanize its audience.

But beyond such camaraderie there is a lot of woman-hating in English punk—not as much as is reported, once again, but more, among significant groups, than in America. Lately the Stranglers, who can be passed off as pseudopunks, have given up their Gold Dildo to Eater, who cannot: "Why don't you get raped/Why don't you get raped/Why don't you get raped/Go and get fucked." You can call this underclass scapegoating, you can talk about the virtues of irony, you can talk about the virtues of candor, you can even praise certain artists for exposing misogyny as the anti-sex sociopathy it is. Say anything you like—those lyrics are still hateful.

They're not the whole story, though. On specific songs—the Sex Pistols' "Bodies," for instance—the power of the statement does, I think, justify and perhaps even necessitate the hatefulness. And there's something more important, especially if you believe, as I do, that an aggressive popular art like rock and roll is a better way to fuse righteous anger than acoustic folk songs or documentaries about the siblinghood of humankind. For coexisting with the misogyny is an unprecedented opportunity for women to make rock and roll. Mick Jones voiced the prevailing attitude: "There ought to be as many girls in bands as boys by now. But if I'm gonna like 'em, they gotta be as tough as we are." In addition to the all-female Lous and X-Ray Spex (led by a young woman who braved the onstage pogoing of her admirers long after her male musicians beat their retreat), I ran across a bassist and two keyboard players in three other bands. That's not exactly a population explosion, but it does represent a significant increase over the number of females who played electric instruments at the Palladium in 1977, one, a punk, Patti Smith, because in punk conceptual energy does the work of chops, which means you needn't have decided to be a rock star 10 years ago to become one now. Not that punk women seem any more inclined to be feminists than punk men. They choose names like the Castrators and the Slits. They talk about free sex like acolytes of the Playboy Philosophy. And they believe in looking out for themselves. Says 16-year-old Arri Up of the Slits: "The reason there's hardly any girl rock 'n' roll stars is because most girls are not strong enough in their own minds."

I hope Arri figures out sometime just why girls have this problem, insofar as they do, and insofar as it's a problem. I also hope Joe Strummer and Johnny Rotten change their hearts and minds about love. The fervent alienation that fuels such ideas suggests an egoism and a crippled capacity for outreach that alarm me. The most encouraging note I can add is that egoism and crippled outreach are no less adolescent than idealism and a desire to reach out, and that maturing—exotic term—is basically a process of becoming aware that other people exist. Hippie romanticized youth's potential for good and continually foundered on its gift for evil. Punk errs in the other direction, but the good is there too, however reluctantly acknowledged, and it may develop more naturally if not too much is expected of it. The thought of punk growing up is not an altogether happy one—its energy is almost as rooted in self-centeredness as its strength is in solidarity. But I hope it does grow up, because it's going to get older regardless.

What Is to Be Done?
The word "punk" can refer to a music and/or a youth movement because the two are inseparable. Not even rockabilly or disco, and certainly not "psychedelic" rock, have enjoyed such a clear, before-and-after, cause-and-effect relationship with a support subculture. In fact, punk rock was conceived by Malcolm McLaren and Bernard Rhodes (out of the intuitions of avant-punks like Iggy and David Johansson) to inspire, or to give shape to, such a subculture. Not that it turned out exactly the way its prophets imagined—the unpredictability of talent was essential to what they wanted to instigate. Still, their ideas have had appreciable effect.

While in England I looked up pioneer punk propagandist Jonh Ingham. Ingham was a student of mine at the California Institute of the Arts when he decided to change the spelling of his name in 1970. This precocious bit of image-building was typical of both his sharpness and his shallowness, but punk has clearly deepened him. The apolitical acidhead now wears a Marx patch, and the lines around his eves belong to someone who's discovered passion. Not that he's so passionate any more. For Ingham, the turning point came last January, when McLaren, instead of investing the Pistols' settlement from EMI in a punk countereconomy, chose to expand punk—or at least his punks—on establishment capital. So it was going to limit itself to good groups after all, Ingham said to himself. Within months he was managing Generation X, now signed to Chrysalis.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
New York Concert Tickets
Loading...