Shining Through a Long, Dark Night: Romanian Cinema, Then and Now

With every “new wave” in cinema, there’s always a past. In conjunction with the Romanian Cultural Institute of New York, the Film Society hosts Shining Through a Long, Dark Night: Romanian Cinema, Then and Now, a look at the similarities and differences between the country’s older films (pre-1989, with all the political censorship of the Ceausescu era) and the daring newer ones—Tudor Giurgiu’s lesbian drama Love Sick being a great example. Tonight features Iulian Mihu’s The Pale Light of Sorrow (1980), a story of one community’s breakdown amid the beginnings of World War I, as seen through the eyes of a young boy who desperately tries to escape his environment by using his imagination. Sunday at Six, directed by Lucian Pintilie, follows—a modern Romeo and Juliet of sorts, the bittersweet tale of two lovers whose relationship is doomed by the country’s harsh political realities. On April 20, Iosif Demian’s A Girl’s Tears (1980) explores a young girl’s mysterious murder and its impact on a Transylvanian village.
Tue., April 15, 2008

 
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