Letters: June 3

The great chaste

Oh, please, Village Voice. Your cover story, 'See Dick Pay Jane' [May 27–June 2), is old hat. Whether with or without sex, it's about geishas. It's time for you to get back to your fine political and cultural reporting.

Alan Flacks

Manhattan

Thanks for bringing this to my attention. This would be like hiring a babysitter, and there would be no pressure to impress. It would be fun to hang out with a woman and watch an old movie and eat popcorn, especially because I am boring and a total loser. My ineptitude and nervousness cause me to become very clumsy around women, and the few dates I've had ended very badly. As matter of public record, I took my aunt to the prom.

Dellos

via internet

I seriously don't think that this job is more alienating or terrible than any other job (and may be significantly better if the event you're attending together is decently fun). I don't see how it's more spiritually draining than, say, mopping the flooded floor of men's bathrooms at a movie theater for minimum wage. I did that once, and it kind of made me want to kill myself.

Justin

via internet

Ms. Brady asks, "What would motivate a man to pay for a strictly nonsexual escort?" She runs through a number of possibilities, but there's one she conveniently overlooks. It's the same philosophy that kept many a hapless fool in long-standing, platonic relationships with girls in their formative years: The majority of men are, by nature, hopeless dreamers, who believe, no matter what evidence to the contrary (in this case, a strong and clearly worded disclaimer), that to be in the presence of a woman is to have a chance of taking it to the "next level."

A market exists, and these ladies are willing to capitalize. More power to them. But let's not kid ourselves. Depicting this business as anything other than preying on the delusional is, at best, disingenuous.

Steve Owens

Brooklyn

If it ain't broke, don't fix it

Re Tom Robbins's 'Obama the Political Fixer' [May 27–June 2]: How ironic: In the '70s, as an outsider, Charles Schumer had no problem challenging the Establishment in open primaries that he won for seats in the Assembly, House, and Senate.

New York's home-grown liberal Democratic reform Brooklyn State Assembly member and Congressperson has come a long way. He has morphed into Washington's most powerful inside-the-Beltway career senator today.

Lighten up, Chuck, and allow the voters, rather than yourself, to make a choice for senator in a 2010 Democratic Party primary. The winner is a lock to win the general election against any Republican.

Larry Penner

Great Neck, New York

I'm sorry, but this is what passes for journalism these days?: "She could be seen waving gleefully from high above, wearing her best Tracy Flick smile, batting her eyes at the president . . ." It's no wonder that newspapers are all going out of business—and with this kind of vicious, unwarranted venom, the sooner, the better.

Senator Gillibrand is all over the state, working hard to help her constituents while simultaneously writing landmark legislation.

Penny Quince

via internet

I'm not a knee-jerk critic of our governor, but he let me—and many others—down when he appointed Kirsten Gillibrand to this seat. I don't believe it was appropriate for the President to endorse her at this early stage, given her scant legislative record and the nature of her appointment, and I hope New Yorkers will give this primary a thorough examination and participate.

Jon Cooper is a liberal voice that speaks for the views of the majority in our state. Given a chance, he is sure to best Gillibrand in an election.

Jon Cruz

via internet

Hey, when did my fellow Democrats stop holding primaries? Jon Cooper is a progressive Democrat, and he has a record to prove it. I don't want a semi-Democrat representing me in the U.S. Senate.

Ken Preston

via internet

 
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