A colleague who'd traveled farther than I had to be present at one of these 30th-anniversary performances of the epochal Childs-Glass-LeWitt creation reminded me that we'd seen it together in the vast, far-from-full Northrop Auditorium in Minneapolis not long after it premiered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (where the Philip Glass Ensemble played the music live). Some in that Minneapolis audience walked out, some hissed and booed. Lovers of dance and music have come a long way. Glass's music has been heard in many contexts, even, I swear, during those moments when you wait for "the next available operator." Repetition now seems more reassuring than boring. Small changes are appreciated in a decade dominated by big, flamboyant ones. Most people left the Fisher Center thrilled by Dance, rightly seeing its performers as glistening, heroic elements of a mixed-media artwork.

Lucinda Childs Dance Company in her 1979 "Dance," with the original performers seen in Sol Lewitt’s film.
Photo by Stephanie Berger
Lucinda Childs Dance Company in her 1979 "Dance," with the original performers seen in Sol Lewitt’s film.

I'm looking out the window of a train as I write this, watching a lake and distant trees that seem almost still through the fast-moving lacework of nearby foliage. Thinking of Childs's Dance, I see this dance of nature differently.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
New York Concert Tickets
Loading...