Gardening Art Grows into Activism in the Age of Occupy

How green was my alley

Against the urban grain: Agnes Denes's Wheatfield—A Confrontation (1982)
Courtesy Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, New York
Against the urban grain: Agnes Denes's Wheatfield—A Confrontation (1982)

If gardening is still radical among artists, though, it's because it has been ignored for the most part by institutions—and why I'm both enthusiastic and reluctant to mention it here. Writing about gardening practices among artists opens up space for considering them as art, but it can also serve as the death knell. (Next up: BMW Guggenheim does guerrilla gardening and "Seed Bombing in the Expanded Field," the dissertation.) But if cooking, education, urban planning, and various communal "encounters" have taken their place as acts of art in recent decades, there's no question that the creative interventions of gardeners belong there, too.

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