The 10 Most Corrupt Tax Loopholes

If Mitt Romney won't tell you which need to be closed, we will

Actually, it already has been destroyed. Despite declaring $18 billion in profits in 2010, Apple paid just 17 percent in federal taxes. It socked away another $74 billion offshore and tax-free.

Who covers the difference when Apple pretends to be Irish? That would be you.

9. How to lower your taxes by sitting on your ass

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg took advantage of a multi-billion dollar tax scam during his company's IPO.
Guillaume Paumier/Creative Commons
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg took advantage of a multi-billion dollar tax scam during his company's IPO.
Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is the poster child of off-shore tax schemes.
Austen Hufford/Creatives Commons
Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is the poster child of off-shore tax schemes.

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Back in the 1970s, "hard work" wasn't just something candidates yammered during campaigns. It was actually imbedded in the tax code. Capital gains—investment income created by things like stock dividends—were taxed at a higher rate than wage income for a simple reason.

"The theory was that it was tougher to dig a ditch than to watch somebody do it," says Robert McIntyre, director of Citizens for Tax Justice.

Even Ronald Reagan knew that someone shouldn't pay less for sitting on his ass. He made the capital gains tax the same as the highest personal rate.

But heavy protection payments have since whittled that notion of "hard work" down to a toothpick. George W. Bush finally hacked it to its current low of just 15 percent.

Officially, the theory is that lowering capital gains will spur investment, creating new companies, new jobs, and prosperity for all. But most economists have found it does little to spur savings and investment.

What it does do is deliver a fortune to investment bankers and financiers like Romney and Warren Buffett, both of whom pay lower rates than their secretaries.

More than 70 percent of the $100 billion that capital gains tax breaks cost the government each year goes to those with incomes in excess of $1 million, according the Joint Committee on Taxation. Even more shocking, the 400 highest-income Americans received 16 percent of all net capital gains in 2009, a total of $37 billion.

Congressman Sander Levin (D-Michigan) has tried to shear this golden lamb by requiring those taking capital gains breaks to prove they actually invested. Yet Congressman Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican and chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, has blocked the bill from ever coming up for a vote.

It's probably just coincidence that since Camp entered Congress in 1998, he has taken a whopping $631,916 from the financial industry. Camp did not respond to repeated interview requests.

8. The Sheryl Crow loophole

It pays to have low friends in high places. Six years ago, legislators from Tennessee, Kentucky, and Texas wanted to reward those who provide the star power to their fundraisers: country musicians. So they passed a law allowing songwriters to avoid income taxes and sell their publishing catalogs at capital gains rates.

Suddenly, Nashville's elite could not only avoid the taxes everyone else must pay, but they could also skirt their Social Security and Medicare bills.

Three years later, Sheryl Crow sold her publishing rights to one of Australia's largest banks for nearly $10 million. Her estimated savings courtesy of this congressional giveaway: $2 million.

The law, however, curiously omitted other creative types who weren't hosting congressmen's rallies. Authors, for example, still must pay standard income taxes for selling the copyrights to their books. The same goes for painters, photographers, screenwriters, and sculptors.

7. Getting rich, Facebook style

Before Facebook offered its first publicly sold stock in May, CEO Mark Zuckerberg grabbed 120 million shares for himself, then threw another 67 million shares to his employees.

It might have seemed an unusual act of generosity for a man not known for his grace. That's because it was also a multibillion dollar tax scam.

The public paid $38 a share for Facebook stock in initial trading. Yet via a sweet little loophole created by Congress, Zuckerberg claimed the shares he gave employees were worth just six cents apiece. By law, Facebook was allowed to deduct the difference—more than $7 billion—as a business expense.

In reality, the employee giveaway cost Facebook nothing. It neither expanded the company's expenses nor increased its liabilities. McIntyre compares it to an airline letting workers fly free in seats that would otherwise have been empty. The airlines don't receive a break because it doesn't cost them anything.

But thanks to some inventive paper shuffling, Facebook will receive a $500 million tax refund next year.

A similar loophole encourages companies to offer executives those bloated compensation packages.

When CEO wages began to spur outrage in the early Clinton years, Congress decided that companies could no longer deduct executive salaries over $1 million as a business expense.

But it also created a loophole that rendered its crackdown meaningless. Exempted were "performance-based" bonuses that surpass that $1 million threshold. A grand new corporate giveaway was born.

Suddenly, CEOs were being slathered with stock options. Companies expensed the giveaway without ever opening their wallets, leaving taxpayers to subsidize caviar compensation plans.

Last year, the five highest-paid CEOs collectively took home $232 million—while their companies received a tidy $81 million in tax breaks.

6. My other home is a yacht

Established in 1913, the mortgage-interest deduction is one of the oldest and most sacred breaks in the code. It's meant to encourage home ownership and stabilize communities.

It doesn't really work, because most people will buy homes whether they receive a break or not. Countries like Australia and Canada have similar ownership rates to ours without offering the deduction.

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118 comments
abbyholmes332
abbyholmes332

If they managed to do it for a long time then I guess they really know the loopholes. The government should review the tax system in order to prevent this in the future.

-Ms. A. Holmes

rima.tipton
rima.tipton

Close these tax loopholes! The corporations should pay taxes correctly and people should never vote for politicians who are beholden to these greedy corporations.

-Rima T.

yisjtinsc
yisjtinsc

    From 2008 to 2010, at least 30 Fortune 500 companies, including PepsiCo, Verizon, Wells Fargo, and DuPont, paid more for lobbyists than they did in taxes. They collectively spent $476 million sucking up to Congress, buying protection for tax breaks, loopholes, and special subsidies. Please review the # of lobbiest in the Obama administration 10. I'm Irish. No, really.     In the late 1980s, Apple decided that Ireland's 12.5 percent corporate tax rate was a much more comely figure than America's 35. But Steve Jobs didn't want to move to Dublin. Fortunately, Congress allowed him to fake it. It’s very rightese you  to bring up the the DEMOCRAT controlled congress during the Regan years. Question where do bills raising revenue ordinate? 9. How to lower your taxes by sitting on your ass     Officially, the theory is that lowering capital gains will spur investment, creating new companies, new jobs, and prosperity for all. But most economists have found it does little to spur savings and investment. What it does do is deliver a fortune to investment bankers and financiers like Romney and Warren Buffett, both of whom pay lower rates than their secretaries. Because the take their payouts in investment throw offs. Don’t you? 8. The Sheryl Crow loophole      So they passed a law allowing songwriters to avoid income taxes and sell their publishing catalogs at capital gains rates.  Suddenly, Nashville's elite could not only avoid the taxes everyone else must pay, but they could also skirt their Social Security and Medicare bills. Three years later, Sheryl Crow sold her publishing rights to one of Australia's largest banks for nearly $10 million. Her estimated savings courtesy of this congressional giveaway: At this time, only wages and the sale of real property is subject to Medicare taxes, SS only to wages to a limited amount. 7. Getting rich, Facebook style     When CEO wages began to spur outrage in the early Clinton years, Congress decided that companies could no longer deduct executive salaries over $1 million as a business expense. But it also created a loophole that rendered its crackdown meaningless. Exempted were "performance based" bonuses that surpass that $1 million threshold. A grand new corporate giveaway was born. Tax something and the politicians in D.C. with find away around it. 6. My other home is a yacht     John Kerry, need I say more? 5. Big Oil's Cadillac welfare     These days, the price of a barrel routinely hovers around $100. But the five biggest companies—BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, and Shell, still get their breaks, despite collective record profits of $137 billion last year. Big Oil creates hundreds of thousands of jobs. How many jobs were created by the Zero Stimulus, which the Fool on the Hill #1, managed? 4. A break for shipping your job to China     Jeep which was rescued by the Obama bailout is setting up shop in China? Italy? And General Electric which has already sent it imaging manufacturing to China, now is relocating it’s Research & Development, also to China. R & D requires individuals with brains, and in following this generates  high paid positions. 3. The behaving like an asshole deduction     Yet even in the Democratically controlled Senate, liberals realize that exposing their corporate patrons to more tax liability will go over like a dieting booth at the county fair. Leahy's bill never made it out of committee. Need I say more? Harry & the Budget! 2. Delaware, the Cayman Islands of America     How dare you talk down, Fool on the Hill #1's home away from home! 1. The corporate blackmail exemption     Does the Village Voice utilize a tax professional in filing it’s Federal, State & NYC filings? Unfortunately, the corporate blackmail exemption nonsense is the calling card of the tax code. Surely even President Failure can see that.

 

YISJTINSC

 

ShannonsWindow
ShannonsWindow

@nickshaxson I like how Robmey wanted to get rid of all "loopholes and exemptions" ex for ones that effect him. Econ goal Rom pays no tax.

scott.huminski
scott.huminski

Pro-Romney Right Wing Judge Rules for Sheriff Arpaio

 

Arpaio-style Law in Future for U.S. With Romney appointments.

 

If Romney is elected, the U.S. can expect more right-wing judicial appointees like the Judge in the following link who is a passionate pro-Arpaio right-wing Judge sitting on the Arizona federal Bench.  Talk about right-wing judicial activism, this Judge has violated fundamental judicial ethical cannons in his blind campaign supportive of Arpaio cronies from the bench. 

 

This judge has single-handedly taken the ABA  Model Rules of Professional Conduct and ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct and flushed them down the toilet.  A little too much order in this Court reminiscent of 1930s fascist tribunals.  The court papers at the link detail a campaign of a judicial home-bred terrorist …  more on the way if Romney has a say.

 

Hold on for a new era of police state terror in the U.S. with Right-Wing judicial appointees.

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/110704206/Right-wing-Fed-Judge-violates-law-to-aid-Sheriff-Arpaio

 

http://atlanta.indymedia.org/global/pro-romney-right-wing-judge-rules-sheriff-arpaio

http://austin.indymedia.org/article/2012/10/22/pro-romney-right-wing-judge-rules-sheriff-arpaio

http://chicago.indymedia.org/node/16691

http://la.indymedia.org/news/2012/10/256592.php

http://twincities.indymedia.org/node/43125

http://neworleans.indymedia.org/news/2012/10/17196.php

http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2012/10/22/18724255.php

 

MysteryOnward
MysteryOnward

@nickshaxson Always remember, tax loopholes are basically Socialism for the wealthy.

PurityBelle
PurityBelle

@deeblake7 @nickshaxson Unbelievable!

MiddleClassPoli
MiddleClassPoli

@nickshaxson I know too much already to be outraged. Good article.

Jeannie Barragan
Jeannie Barragan

It must stop look at Iceland if you dare to.That is what will happen here in the near future. Enough of the wall street thugs.

nekoman
nekoman

What I want to know is how did Mitt and Ann Romney manage to get a HUGE tax deduction for dressage horses? A HOBBY of Ann Romney for goodness sake! I never knew horses were an allowable deduction in the tax code. Or, is that in the WEALTHY tax code? Like yachts being deducted as HOMES since they have bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen! The Romneys claim that the reason they refuse to show their tax returns, like everyone else, including his father, has, is because they don't want us people seeing their "charitable contributions"! Tell me. Why on earth would they want to hide that? Unless, their "charity" ALL those millions, one way or another, sooner or later, benefits the Mormon Church. Which all their "charity" is funneled to Salt Lake City, Utah , worldwide headquarters of the Mormon church. There just so happens to be a $4 billion dollar "city improvement project" going on in SLC. SLC was beneficiary of infrastructure improvements for the Winter Olympics that Mitt Romney claims to have "saved". What he fails to mention is that he conned the Federal Government into paying for improvement to the infrastructure in SLC, bringing in bus drivers from out of state, at union wages, etc.  He didn't 'save the Winter Olympics, we the taxpayers, thanks to the Fed, saved the Winter Olympics AT OUR EXPENSE! And, improved the city all for the glory of the Mormon church! Where was " Separation of church and state"? as written by Thomas Jefferson. Sickening! And, there's people that are actually voting for this liar, this con-man!

wherearethefacts
wherearethefacts

Oh the horror! the outrage!

But...but...

we can fan the flames and make FedEx and Nordstroms evil,

OR

we can ask the very simple question - why?

But the media doesn't want you to have details - it takes away from the headline.

What's different between FedEx and UPS?

What's different between Nordstroms and Macys?

This article wants you to believe it's because of lobbyists.

But there's no proof. There's no analysis. There's no nothing, except the ignorant outrage of the author.

 

BloomMan
BloomMan

Do you really believe there is significant difference between Obama and Romney, let alone Bush? They are shills for the banks and wall street with enormous amount of PAC money. All the bankers got paid multi-year bonuses while I struggle to make ends meet. It's Fucked Up

mbrachman
mbrachman

Excellent article, but again I say, the people who invented and still continue to use pagination for interwebs articles will be consigned to a circle of hell lower than any imagined by Dante. SINGLE-PAYER HEALTH CARE and SINGLE-PAGE ARTICLES!!

ireland
ireland

@GTCost But can it be considered a tax haven if most of the revenue isn't taxed there? @mrs_bopp @RealEddieHobbs

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese There is corruption in a 72,000+ page tax code? I am shocked, shocked to hear about it.

RedScareBot
RedScareBot

Don't Smoke Hope RT @MysteryOnward: @nickshaxson Always remember, tax loopholes are basically Socialism for the wealthy.

paha
paha

 @nowayman Yes, the fundamental laws of physics continue to hold true... you cannot "create" energy. There will always be inefficiencies, even in the production of ethanol. 

 

I agree that ethanol has some serious downsides, but the fact that its creation process obeys the laws of physics is not one of them.

joker01210
joker01210

 @mbrachman

 I agree with you about the article pagination in a way, because I hate having to click to continue reading.. but you have to understand that you would be scrolling for days if some of these long articles were listed on one page.  The pages could be wider to display more but then mobile users would have issues.  Reasonable sacrifices have to be made.

GTCost
GTCost

@ireland + no loopholes. Ireland is one mighty loophole for global tax evasion. @mrs_bopp @RealEddieHobbs

GTCost
GTCost

@ireland + Like yourself, I believe in low taxation. But low rate only works when it is enforced and there are + | @mrs_bopp @RealEddieHobbs

GTCost
GTCost

@ireland It makes it worse then, because we are just an enabling stage for even more tax evasion. Global scale + | @mrs_bopp @RealEddieHobbs

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim I'm surprised, since you're so keen on holding onto your money.

JeremyTaxman
JeremyTaxman

@GTCost @ireland @mrs_bopp Not evasion. Avoidance. Remember that the government has been the main supplier of tax avoidance schemes for yrs

mrs_bopp
mrs_bopp

@GTCost Like a mafia bag man @ireland @RealEddieHobbs

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese That said, given the horrid US rate, I can't blame companies for working to get that reduced. Cut rates & deductions.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I'm in favor of holding honestly acquired bits. Lobbying gov't for special treatment eliminates the honest part.

JeremyTaxman
JeremyTaxman

@mrs_bopp @GTCost @ireland we're not even close to being good at this. We could do much more!

JeremyTaxman
JeremyTaxman

@ireland @GTCost @mrs_bopp avoidance. If its legal, its avoidance, if its not, its evasion. mitigation, dodging, structuring, all legal.

mrs_bopp
mrs_bopp

@JeremyTaxman I agree. It may be more accurate to describe Eire as a *tax avoidance enabler supreme* ;-) @GTCost @ireland

ireland
ireland

@JeremyTaxman Is "tax dodging" equal to evasion or avoidance? @GTCost @mrs_bopp

GTCost
GTCost

@JeremyTaxman True. I stand corrected. | @ireland @mrs_bopp

JFTAXI
JFTAXI

If thats true,then they will hardly be able to run off, if they have to pay more taxes here. @ireland @mrs_bopp @GTCost @RealEddieHobbs

ireland
ireland

@JFTAXI Lots of financial companies only here because of loose regulation. @mrs_bopp @GTCost @RealEddieHobbs

ireland
ireland

@JFTAXI Agreed. @mrs_bopp @GTCost @RealEddieHobbs

JFTAXI
JFTAXI

IMHO the IFSC is the biggest money laundering scheme in the world, been saying that for years. @mrs_bopp @GTCost @ireland @RealEddieHobbs

GTCost
GTCost

@mrs_bopp It is id 2 prob of low-cost regulation - it only works if the rules are vigorously enforced | @ireland @RealEddieHobbs

GTCost
GTCost

@mrs_bopp In a reverse way, yes. Mafia bagman collects. Ireland facilitates evasion. | @ireland @RealEddieHobbs

GTCost
GTCost

@mrs_bopp @steve_hanke I suspect it also has the fourth - the 'black market' specialist rate for regime cronies.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese But I do agree politician shouldn't be a career.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Make then eligible to serve 2 terms or something on a rotating schedule so there is always someone experienced.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I would like to try in NY making legislative chamber a party based assembly.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese That just shifts the point of corruption from the legislator to the long serving adviser.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Politician shouldn't be a career. Draft them for a term from eligible voters like a jury. The lawyers should do the advising.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Politicians are loath to give up power, which is why it shouldn't be given to them in the first place.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim What we need is individual voting on issues that our reps see and vote according to us. Wont happen because who gives up power?

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Change will be difficult, yes.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim I am not paid to vote though. It really isn't messy, it's entrenched and there is too much money involved to change it.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Lobbyist are also voters. See how it gets messy?

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Yes, and it butts up to 1st amendment rights and the stupid money/politics debate. It should rest with voters not lobbyists.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Twitter is substandard venue for this. We need to meet for some beers and proper discussion.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese You cannot eliminate those voices. Trying to do so will make you worse than any profiteer.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim When their vote or voice can be bought to tout invasion.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I abhor political corruption, which increases as the size of the government increases.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I don't think there has been proper profiteering in the US since WWII. Maybe gas spikes? But gov't causes those.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Fine line you're walking there pure capitalist.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I don't like lobbying, but I can't think of an honest way to prevent it.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Profits from selling machinery for war is not necessarily profiteering.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Are you for or against weapons manufactures profits (war profiteering which I thought was illegal) used to lobby government?

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese That's a plausible theory.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Equitably sharing the responsibility. Maybe if there were more consequences to warring we wouldn't do it so often.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Quite a bit less. Are you trying to maximize revenue, or just take people's stuff?

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim When it was 90% and we had to pay back our enormous war debt how much was it? Hmm, sounds familiar...

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese IIRC, top 20% of income filers pay 70% of the income taxes collected.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I too expect things from my gov'ts. Things I'll pay for. Then there is all the other bullshit the gov't do...

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I would agree. Taxes are an obligation, but I wouldn't call them a duty.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Ah. See, I've never considered taxes to be patriotic. Maybe if less gov't $ was devoted to infringing my human rights ...

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim 'Large' does not have any context when ignoring a rate or percentage.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim The rich who skirt paying are to me, very very unpatriotic. Lest they forget the country which enabled their wealth.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese ... Because they pay thievish cigarette duties because the rich pay such a large share of the income taxes collected?

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim I see it as a duty. I expect things from my govt so I pay my share. I do think that share is unequally leveled against the poor.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Taxes would not be collected without a credible threat of violence, or do you not understand how they work?

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Gunpoint? Speaking to the guy who vehemently is against gun control of any kind...you're quite a cunt.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese You will only help people at gunpoint? You're an asshole.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese That's a good start. Take HUD, ATF, DEA, and TSA with it.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Well, I want mine to be spent on helping people. I am not selfish or cruel.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Fine. Lets get rid of it and those states I referenced before fall apart and people die. Yay!

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese "Fun" fact: The poverty rate stopped dropping with the implementation of LBJ's "Great Society." Coincidence? Nope.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Should we help? Yes. Is gov't the best way to help? Seldom. The federal gov't? NO.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Compassion? Gov't programs are not compassionate. Compassion is voluntary, gov't is coercive.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim On what basis? Do you not have compassion for the man you haven't met?

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I agree that frivolity and subsidies are bad. I disagree on Federal social spending.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Nope, that's a trap. Social welfare is a better option than frivolous defense spending and large corp subsidies was my point.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese So you agree that we should end poorly designed and/or unconstitutional programs.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Economics dictates that we're enabling this welfare. Cut them loose and people will have to move to favorable states or be poor

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese I reject your so called point. The programs are the problem.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese If they're getting $ from shitty programs, then yes, cut the programs.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Wasn't my point. Those shitty states receive more than they pay in. They are welfare states. Cut them loose.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Bum states like CA, IL, and NY certainly should not be bailed out by the feds.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese *shrug* VA is going to get more from the Navy than SD. Agriculture shouldn't be paying anyone.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim I think those solvent states should cut the laggards loose.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Food stamps are a good state/local program. Lousy/unconstitutional federal program.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim At least that's a conservative conclusion. I still feel helping people is the best course of action though.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Money transfers do not stimulate the economy, but I'll take keeping the $ away from the TSA molesters as a first step.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim The poor can't invest it, they spend it immediately on goods needed (yes sometime frivolous things too no argument there).

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim I'd rather the poor get money to directly stimulate the economy rather than us wasting it touching our balls at the airport.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Yes: Worthless to counterproductive "aid." And the liberty infringers, their upside is...?

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@militiajim Half of those provide aid for our money the other half infringe our rights for the money.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Explain again how those programs, apologies for forgetting ATF and DEA, help poor people. HUD Fucks them good, though.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim So essentially, fuck poor people. Got it.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Eeyup. + TSA, DHS, HUD, 50%+ of agriculture, SBA, DofEd... I've got a long list.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese Cut the rate a lot and cut all the loopholes. Of course we need to cut federal spending by at least 30% too.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim Cut the loopholes, yes, maybe cut rate a bit, make them pay it. They can't not afford to do business in the US.

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese It isn't paid because of the corruption in Congress. Cut the rates and the loopholes.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim It's not like it's paid all that much anyway....so what's the point?

MilitiaJim
MilitiaJim

@AbnormousCheese It's the highest in the bloody world, and - for value.

AbnormousCheese
AbnormousCheese

@MilitiaJim It's not horrid. It's the cost of doing business in the greatest economy in the world.

 
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