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Alfonso Cuarón, Sandra Bullock, and George Clooney in Venice for the screening of Gravity.
Alfonso Cuarón, Sandra Bullock, and George Clooney in Venice for the screening of Gravity.

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Gravity
Directed by Alfonso Cuarón
In theaters October 4

http://gravitymovie.warnerbros.com/

http://www.labiennale.org/en/cinema/



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Given the amount of balderdash we have to swallow just to get through a typical summer movie season, taking a small leap of faith and imagination with Cuarón should hardly be a problem. Gravity is harrowing and comforting, intimate and glorious, the kind of movie that makes you feel more connected to the world rather than less. In space, no one can hear you scream. But a whole audience can hear you breathe. And that is a wondrous thing.



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8 comments
victorprovenzano
victorprovenzano

I am more than willing to receive a Volcan salute and a kick in the pants, Stephanie, and to give as good as I get. The mark of good science fiction is that it is rooted in plausibility, i.e., in good physics. Gravity is a work of science fiction hiding behind a rather thin veneer of present-day science fact, which makes its failings in the realm of plausibility far worse: the Russians fire a missile at a satellite whose debris may threaten to annihilate their own space station; no tendons are ripped in half; no bones are torn from their sockets; no one has a spine shattered by the high-speed collisions during his or her “spacewalk”; no space suit is shredded by the sharp and varied surfaces of the space stations or escape pods; etc. The film is entirely risible. As for the dialogue, is there a single moment of nuance in it or a single ontological or philosophical reflection that is even worth contemplating? No, Stephanie, this is not 2001. It is entirely insipid. I am embarrassed to be of the same species that made this film or that thinks that it is among the “10 finest films” to see the light in 2013 in the U.S., in a year that also saw the emergence of Faust, Leviathan, Upstream Color, Blue is the Warmest Color, Vanishing Waves, The Machine Which Makes Everything Disappear, The Act of Killing, and Selfish Giant, not to mention Ginger and Rosa, Lore, Nebraska, 12 Years a Slave, and the Past. Gravity has all the acute failings of the culture that filmed it: fascination with an incessant series of “calamities”; the inanity of the “adrenaline rush”; the absence of any compelling insight; a “subtle” residue of Cold War disdain for the Russians; a jejune mythic sense of its own ability to be heroic; along with an immense dose of trifling special effects that are free of any content and are often free of any scientific plausibility.

Buffslayer
Buffslayer

The village voice used to be about ideas.  To delete or remove intelligent and well argued comments that are against what the author has posted is to shut down a discussion that could help many individuals learn more about society, art, and film... and good journalism.  It's pretty sad.  And something I would expect of fascists.  I guess tyranny and censorship can take place at any point on the political spectrum.

suritter123
suritter123

I want to see this movie this weekend. I can already feel the magnificent wonder!

Bruce4078
Bruce4078

"At the time Mission to Mars was released, detractors made fun of the allegedly stiff dialogue."  

Oh that's still happening, I assure you lol.

Kat_Olenska
Kat_Olenska

@blm849 I don't think I can. That would require more weed than I have on-hand.

 

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