Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave and Tony Revolori as Zero in The Grand Budapest Hotel.
Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave and Tony Revolori as Zero in The Grand Budapest Hotel.
Tilda Swinton behind the scenes of The Grand Budapest Hotel.
Tilda Swinton behind the scenes of The Grand Budapest Hotel.

Details

See also
- Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel: A Marzipan Monstrosity by Stephanie Zacharek.

- The Grand Budapest Hotel Is Wes Anderson's Most Mature and Visually Witty Effort by Amy Nicholson.

- Behind the Scenes of The Grand Budapest Hotel

- The Wes Anderson-Bill Murray Connection



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Hotel Chevalier is only 13 minutes long, but it's as rich as a novel. The atmosphere is controlled -- practically the whole thing takes place in a hotel room and its adjoining balcony -- but Anderson lets danger and mystery in, more so than in any of his other movies. Hotel Chevalier is less a pure Wes Anderson film than a zephyr of Truffaut being channeled through Anderson; Schwartzman is his Antoine Doinel, a bundle of nerves in search of love in spite of himself. Anyone who can make a Hotel Chevalier must still have some surprises up his sleeve. Someday Wes Anderson might use his technical mastery, his sense of total control, to make a live-action movie that shows how little in life any of us can really control. It will be an adventure; it will be dangerous. And it will breathe.


Follow Stephanie Zacharek on Twitter at @szacharek
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41 comments
FindTrueGenius
FindTrueGenius

My first issue with Wes Anderson is his fear of real emotions. He continually stamps out all emotion, until his characters are flat cardboard cutouts. Then any little flash of emotion is treated like a huge deal. Truth is, emotion is critical to life, and stamping out all emotion makes the films lifeless, dull and boring.  My second issue is his hatred of authority figures - it's always the juvenile characters who call the shots, have the ideas, rule the roost or lair or den - just like the Disney channel. So may be you have to be 13 to find the "wisdom" in his stuff, but thankfully the majority of us are smarter than that. Anderson has invented a good gig for himself, working out his therapy homework, his issues with emotions and authority to the tune of other people's millions and trying to call it "films" or "art" or "whimsy" but he's the true emperor with no clothes. There's nothing genius or even interesting about the Anderson "films" -  we really should call them "Viewmaster filmstrips" because they are that lifeless - and anything on Turner Classic Movies has this stuff beat by a million miles. The genius is in tricking the gullible into thinking it's worth watching - that's the real story about Anderson that needs to be told. How is he fooling the few who think he's great? Where's that shell game playing out? It's not based in reality, so what brain circuits is he triggering in the few that make the many go looking for glory in Anderson's work, and always come away disappointed?

Anon
Anon

Nothing raises the hackles of a nation of mediocrities quite like the daunting artistry of a master. Same critiques were levelled at Kubrick. Anderson's hyper-artificial movies are the perfect movies for a hyper-artificial culture. That he treats his movie worlds like a novelist is something to be commended, not attacked. We should have more directors who give a shit like he does.

cafelinus
cafelinus

I like some of that guy's movies just fine but I'm trying to love myself. Do you have any advice?

NamraTurnip
NamraTurnip

@thehighsign we Rushmore fans have gotta stick together. We're building a salt tear sluice for when the great B. Murray dies. Join us

mimbale
mimbale

@flipyourface oh wow, she likes the only two Andersons I dislike or hate. I wonder how that works exactly? (I like "'Aha!' or perhaps 'Oho'"

cconnolly
cconnolly

Once again, Stephanie Zacharek nails something perfectly and I couldn't agree with her more about Anderson. 


It's undeniable that Anderson is an intelligent, thoughtful film maker and like Zacharek states, there are way too few of these around nowadays. But Anderson's attention to detail is annoying. He's too carried away by his own sense of whimsy and too busy trying to make us aware of it that his films (to me) feel cold, calculated and emotionally distant. I get the same feeling (in a different way) from most of the films made by Ken Russell, another director who put his style ahead of story telling and character. Actors probably love working with him because they think his films are "different" and cutting edge and that's why I think a lot of people (mostly much younger than me) fall for his films as well. I don't think he's really that original at all. He's studied film and film makers and copies a lot of other directors styles (especially the late, great Hal Ashby. Anderson's "Rushmore" should have been labeled a homage to Ashby, so blatant was his ripping off of his visual style).

CHN_AdamWodon
CHN_AdamWodon

@szacharek great analysis Stephanie - but I can't help but love (most of) his movies. I find myself reveling in his quirks, not annoyed

cjam
cjam

@anissegross very mixed reactions to the new one. Kind of want to see it just for that reason.

thehighsign
thehighsign

@NamraTurnip Please do not even float the concept of B. Murray dying! Way too soon, & too upsetting to contemplate. But yes, Rushmore 4ever.

flipyourface
flipyourface

@mimbale I gotcha. But after reading David Thomson's disgraceful business, I'm grateful for a piece that shows engagement and some humility.

NamraTurnip
NamraTurnip

@thehighsign This is extremely irresponsible. I'm just yacking. I've no idea what goes on. Say hi to Julia! (swan dives into laundry chute)

NamraTurnip
NamraTurnip

@thehighsign Man, there is no too soon. I remember seeing Murray as a reimagined Scrooge in, I dunno, 1991? Earlier still in Stripes.

mimbale
mimbale

@flipyourface It's good. (I didn't read DT's.) But I really wonder what's going on. We must be reacting to the same exact things oppositely.

NamraTurnip
NamraTurnip

@thehighsign Oh, and I apologize for everything. And ffs, La Thingie Bellezza was good. But, ermm. You should renounce it. Hassle!!!

MSethStewart
MSethStewart

@flipyourface ah ok I see, that pastry on a tin plate metaphor is definitely tacky. The rest of it was spot-on.

DecentFilms
DecentFilms

@jedpressfate Was only guessing. Should've gone with first thought & just written, "I'm not sure what you mean by 'not a critique." Cheers.

 

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