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  • Double Takes

    Article

    Double Takes

    Plautus, Shakespeare, Goldoni, Anouilh: Everyone loves the confusion and the occult aura generated by identical twins. It took Paula Vogel, though, to see them as a perfect image for America's peculiarly schizophrenic culture. On its surface, The Min...

    by Michael Feingold on February 23, 1999
  • Article

    Paul Schmidt - 19341999

    I first met Paul Schmidt in 1992. He was going to translate Brecht's St. Joan of the Stockyards, which I would then direct at Yale Rep. His reputation was formidable, and I went with trepidation to his apartment, standing in front of his door for a m...

    by Liz Diamond on February 23, 1999
  • Sweet Talk

    Article

    Sweet Talk

    Sentiment and edginess make strange bedfellows, whether they're shacking up in the run-down flats of Jonathan Harvey's '90s London or screwing in the tract house of Marlane Meyer's 1955 California. The measured doses of the two elements most likely t...

    by James Hannaham on February 23, 1999
  • After the Guru - Young Artists Confront Grotowski's Legacy

    Article

    After the Guru - Young Artists Confront Grotowski's Legacy

    When theatrical visionary Jerzy Grotowski died last month at 65, he left a long and distinguished legacy. Obituaries lumped him with Stanislavsky and Brecht and likened the Polish director to a Zen master. For a generation of experimental theater art...

    by Stephen Nunns on February 23, 1999
  • Article

    Apply Polish Sparingly - Martha Graham's Heritage Strides On

    A matriarch dies, and an incomparable collection of silver and china passes to her devoted heirs. Some pieces are kept in exquisite order. Others somehow develop hairline cracks. A saucer goes missing. Harsh new polish destroys a spoon's patina. Addi...

    by Deborah Jowitt on February 16, 1999
  • Article

    Uptown Girl

    Mia Michaels, whose company, Reality at Work, makes its New York debut Wednesday through Sunday at the Upper East Side's Playhouse 91, has choreographed for Prince, Gloria Estefan, and MTV's Hot Properties. Her dancers exude steely instead of noodly ...

    by Kate Mattingly on February 16, 1999
  • Pop Eyed

    Article

    Pop Eyed

    Playing the fearless leader of a marauding gang, Stacie Hirsch screws up her face into a mask of comic ferocity. Her lipsa bright red pucker painted onto a background of whitetwist like telephone wire. Her eyebrowswrought-iron curlicues drawn onto...

    by Alisa Solomon on February 16, 1999
  • The Way We Were

    Article

    The Way We Were

    I've never been much of a Jennifer Bartlett fan. Her work always seemed premiseless, muddy, and without vision; as an artist, she is more of a combiner, or an adept copyist, than a creator. Except for Rhapsody. Until last week, I only knew her epic u...

    by Jerry Saltz on February 16, 1999
  • Article

    Stitchcraft

    I don't much like my daughter sewing," the novelist Colette remarked. "She is silent, and shewhy not write down the word that frightens meshe is thinking." For centuries, needlework and knitting kept women's hands occupied while their minds worked ...

    by Leslie Camhi on February 16, 1999
  • Durable Goods

    Article

    Durable Goods

    You can quibble and you can mockI often dobut after half a century, Death of a Salesman is still viable merchandise. It's as if Arthur Miller had set out to prove his hero's assertions about the old ways and the old goods being better. Yes, in a fe...

    by Michael Feingold on February 16, 1999
  • Article

    Asian Lite

    Ethnic pride can be a dangerous thing. It can burst out in civil unrest, or, at its most bloodless, in historical pageantsbenign propaganda masquerading as drama. Making Tracks (Taipei Theater) is a display of Asian American boosterism, clunkily con...

    by Francine Russo on February 16, 1999
  • The Escape Artist

    Article

    The Escape Artist

    Alex Garland's first novel, The Beach, was and is great escape literature in every sense of the term. Written with the twenty-twentysomething clarity of a Windex-blue lagoon, Garland's tragic tale of tropical paradise found and subsequently lost in a...

    by Richard Gehr on February 16, 1999
  • The Hothouse - The atrocity that inspired Tennessee Williams's Not About Nightingales

    Article

    The Hothouse - The atrocity that inspired Tennessee Williams's Not About Nightingales

    In 1938, when a struggling young playwright named Tennessee Williams read a newspaper account of four gruesome murders in a Philadelphia prison, he was outraged and inspired. Subsisting on a regimen of coffee and sleeping pills that kept him feeling...

    by Jay Dixit on February 16, 1999
  • About a Boy - An Interview With Matthew Stadler

    Article

    About a Boy - An Interview With Matthew Stadler

    At the age of 40 novelist Matthew Stadler has seen all of his previous novels go out of print. Positive reviews, prestigious Merrill Foundation and Whiting Writers awards, and a Guggenheim fellowship haven't been enough to keep his books on the restl...

    by Hugh Garvey on February 16, 1999
  • Article

    White Lies: Race and the Myths of Whiteness

    Near the end of this powerful book, art scholar Maurice Berger reveals that he had set out to produce a "linear" study of race but changed his mind. Thank goodness. He fully vindicates Walter Benjamin's celebrated remarks on the incendiary power o...

    by David Roediger on February 16, 1999
  • Women's Rites

    Article

    Women's Rites

    What does a spinster teacher in 1930s St. Louis have in common with a Mennonite teen in modern Canada? Angst and plenty of it. Like women ever and always, from Evanston to Kabul, they chafe against binding roles; they struggle to subdue or unleash...

    by Francine Russo on February 9, 1999
  • Howl

    Article

    Howl

    David Wojnarowicz was angry enough to become a murderer, but instead he became an artist. Again and again, in his writings, he imagines himself committing savage acts "tipping amazonian blowdarts in 'infected blood' and spitting them at the exposed ...

    by Jerry Saltz on February 9, 1999
  • Article

    Multiple Choice

    The artist Ricci Albenda, whose 1998 exhibition at Andrew Kreps was his breakthrough, has in his curatorial debut attempted an ambitious exercise that inverts normal operations by considering art objects not for their content but rather for how they ...

    by Bill Arning on February 9, 1999
  • Doom Service

    Article

    Doom Service

    The Museum of Natural History owns some dinosaur feces, but it probably doesn't have a piece of crap as big as Sightline Stage Co.'s The End of Civilization (Raw Space). Canadian George F. Walker's noir, receiving its U.S. premiere, is a heavy-handed...

    by Sightlines on February 9, 1999
  • Unsound Bites

    Article

    Unsound Bites

    Is it the end of the century, or is it just me? I keep thinking the theater's meant to be a great unifying place that sweeps its vast vision across all of human experience, but all I find when I go is little bits and pieces of I was going to say "hu...

    by Michael Feingold on February 9, 1999
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From the Print Edition

Audra McDonald Brings Billie Holiday to Life in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill

Any theatergoer expecting in this revival of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill an excuse for an Audra McDonald concert won't find the singer's full-bodied, mellifluous voice here. Instead,… More >>

The Heir Apparent Brims With Linguistic Panache and Stellar Performances

"I'm a one-man Comédie-Française," boasts the scheming servant Crispin, comparing his acting skills to France's national theater. Crispin (Carson Elrod) isn't totally exaggerating: In the course of The Heir Apparent,… More >>

Photographic Fiction and Fact in the LES Photographic Fiction and Fact in the LES

Within a block of each other on the Lower East Side, two photographers who dig into genres we thought we already knew — Heather Bennett uses self-portraiture to don various… More >>

Shameless and Uncharismatic, Bullets Over Broadway Loses The Sophistication of Its Source Material

Bullets Over Broadway is an old-fashioned musical, if for you the term "old-fashioned" connotes a version of 1920s New York in which Italian-American stereotypes are the only ethnic other, most… More >>

Infidelity and Architecture Underpin the Meditative Isolde

Richard Maxwell’s new play is about myth, memory, and a house that never gets built. Lighter and more sardonic than the playwright-director’s recent work (especially 2013’s densely poetic Neutral Hero),… More >>

Scott Z. Burns and Steven Soderbergh Team Up For Post-Colombine Psychological Mystery The Library

Audiences today need little urging to accept age- and color-blind casting on the stage, but Steven Soderbergh and Scott Z. Burns's life-in-the-aftermath drama The Library perhaps pushes viewers to accept… More >>

A Hilarious Ride Through the Inner Workings of a Small Town Arts Council in The Most Deserving

Sotheby's and Christie's may have cornered the real-world market for bitchiness and backstabbing in the name of art, but in The Most Deserving, Catherine Trieschmann's newest play, produced by Women's… More >>

Will Eno and Lorraine Hansberry Write Home in Two New Productions

Is New York theater suffering a housing crisis? How else to explain the glut of this season's plays (Fun Home, The Open House, A Doll's House, The Tribute Artist, The… More >>

Beautiful and Violent Art from the Civil Rights Movement at New Brooklyn Museum Show Witness

Something is terribly wrong with the sedan in this black-and-white photo: The doors gape open, glass is shattered, dark drips trail down the seat back. In 1965, civil rights activist… More >>

Rich Visual Schemes Undermine Dramatic Subtlety in The Threepenny Opera

The Threepenny Opera, now at Atlantic Theater, is no conventional, rough-hewn beggars' tale. For this staging, director Martha Clarke applies her sophisticated visual sensibilities to Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's… More >>

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