<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  106  |  ...  |  212  |  ...  |  318  |  ...  |  410  |  411  |  412  |  ...  |  424  |  Next Page >> 8201 - 8220 of 8478

  • Heady Amusements

    Article

    Heady Amusements

    Playwrights worry about pleasing audiences, but probably no playwright has ever worried about it as openly as Christopher Durang does in Betty's Summer Vacation. He worries so much that he's actually put the audience into his cast of characters. Whil...

    by Michael Feingold on March 16, 1999
  • Article

    Andr Ernotte - 19441999

    I had the great honor and joy of working with Andr Ernotte on six musicals over the past 12 years. Andr was a gentle and brilliant man. As a director he was at once fanciful and practical. He combined flawless artistic taste and daring with a fl...

    by Polly Pen on March 16, 1999
  • Revise and Consent

    Article

    Revise and Consent

    Brecht has never had an easy time of it in America, and his Lehrstcke or teaching plays have had the hardest time of all. Rarely produced or even studied, they are the preferred weapons of the most ardent Brecht-bashers, wielded as exemplars of hi...

    by Alisa Solomon on March 16, 1999
  • Article

    Taylorama

    Shuffles and twists and wriggles and jumps are no longer to be used in connection with dancing," wrote Vernon Castle in his 1914 manual, Modern Dancing. "The hoydenish romping of the Two Step, the swift rush of the Polka and contortions of the Turkey...

    by Deborah Jowitt on March 9, 1999
  • Article

    Giddy Up

    Converting a horse stable on East 91st Street into a theater for dance was cake compared to getting patrons uptown. Joan Finkelstein, director of the 92nd Street Y Harkness Dance Project, says Playhouse 91 provides "an intimate performance venue, ...

    by Kate Mattingly on March 9, 1999
  • Article

    Lap Dances

    On its face, Keely Garfield's choreography looks like a lot of tumbling around, with little direct relationship to the music accompanying it. On her face, Garfield often wears a deadpan expression, with eyes downcast. But the more you watch her due...

    by Elizabeth Zimmer on March 9, 1999
  • Heartbreak House

    Article

    Heartbreak House

    "I can't say I'm not enjoying writing it," Chekhov wrote to his publisher in 1895 about The Seagull, "though I'm flagrantly disregarding the basic tenets of the stage. The comedy has three female roles, six male roles, four acts, a landscape (a view ...

    by Charles McNulty on March 9, 1999
  • The Uneasy Dance - A Purge of the Beijing Opera in Chay Yew's Red

    Article

    The Uneasy Dance - A Purge of the Beijing Opera in Chay Yew's Red

    Chay Yew delights in tweaking our ideas about Asian culture and Asian Americans. Take his new play, Red. One of the characters, Sonja Wong Pickford, is a bestselling author who makes no bones about spicing up her "Oriental" love stories because she k...

    by Gerard Raymond on March 9, 1999
  • Article

    The Gay '50s

    Melodrama has become a bad word, though it remains the dominant genre of our dreams well, at least mine are filled with unjust accusations, fugitive escapes, and pathetic pleas for last-minute rescue. Director Ed Chemaly's adaptation of Eugene Wa...

    by Charles McNulty on March 9, 1999
  • Mr. Wizard

    Article

    Mr. Wizard

    It's in the blood. It's in the bone. After years of strange, failed contraptions, my father, who was an inventor, hit pay dirt when he came up with what came to be known as the Dexter Hand Sewing Machine. Maybe you've seen one; probably you haven't. ...

    by Jerry Saltz on March 9, 1999
  • Article

    Pot Stash

    More Picasso? The announcement of yet another exhibition devoted to art's most sacred monster is liable to provoke a sense of fatigue and (dare we say it?) resentment. Happily, these feelings melt away entirely before the sheer sensual delight of th...

    by Leslie Camhi on March 9, 1999
  • Article

    Looking Blackward

    Walking on Water was culled from a heroic enterprise: the author's six-year crisscrossing of these United States in search of the meaning of Blackness today. What It Doth Feel Like Being Black Right Now. Randall Kenan's interviewees (born from 1910 t...

    by Greg Tate on March 9, 1999
  • Article

    Sinatraland

    You're in a bar nursing a Jack on the rocks. Your girl just quit you and you're hurting. But someone cares, someone whose voice cuts through the smoke, singing "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)." He's been there before. You emulate his cool...

    by Mark Rotella on March 9, 1999
  • Diversion 2.0

    Article

    Diversion 2.0

    No one ever went broke, they say, underestimating the intelligence of the American public. But even underestimating is more complicated now than it used to be: The simple public is very knowing and doesn't like to be told how simple it is; it likes t...

    by Michael Feingold on March 9, 1999
  • Article

    Roots Music

    The musical Running Man, now showing at HERE, is a hymn to all the sons this country has stolen from her African American families. At 10, Tommy is a prodigy; at 20, he's a fugitive. A child who once sated his hunger for knowledge in books as his mo...

    by Pamela Renner on March 9, 1999
  • Double Vision

    Article

    Double Vision

    There's safety in numbers. Or misery loves company. Or two heads are better than one. Whatever the reason, some artists work better together, in collaboration although couple says it best. It makes a certain sense: the pressures are so intense, and ...

    by Jerry Saltz on March 2, 1999
  • Article

    Slugs and Fuzz

    If checklists weren't so eager to disclose the cache, art viewing might aptly resemble an Easter egg hunt. Boomerang (1998), Melissa McGill's small mirrored gobs of blown glass thoughtfully deposited throughout C/R/G's premises, proposes an arduous ...

    by Sue Spaid on March 2, 1999
  • Article

    Gender Games - From Spain, Japan, and the Downtown Hinterlands

    The way some people talk about flamenco, you'd think it was all about sex; the dancers seem to size one another up for conquest, to taunt the musicians and audience with their prowess. The typical flamenco duet is a hot item, rendered hotter by the f...

    by Deborah Jowitt on March 2, 1999
  • Article

    Talking Dance

    Tina Croll and James Cunningham's More From the Horse's Mouth, part of a program rotating into Dance Theater Workshop's Carnival Series March 9 through 28, lets older dancers recall the poignant moments in their lives when they came to understand t...

    by Kevin Giordano on March 2, 1999
  • Janis in Wonderland

    Article

    Janis in Wonderland

    Because Janis Joplin's recording legacy doesn't live up to her performing legend, because she's a symbol of boomers' hegemonic hold on cultural history, because as a rare and extravagant female in a male world her meaning has been stiflingly overdete...

    by Evelyn McDonnell on March 2, 1999
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  106  |  ...  |  212  |  ...  |  318  |  ...  |  410  |  411  |  412  |  ...  |  424  |  Next Page >> 8201 - 8220 of 8478
New York Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

From the Print Edition

Dishonorable Recharge: Preston Sturges Deserves Better

"I've always been sensible and good," cries Isabelle Parry (Keilly McQuail), a Southern belle getting her first taste of the wicked big city. Now our ingenue just wants to drink… More >>

The New Museum Assembles a Staggering Show of Arab Art The New Museum Assembles a Staggering Show of Arab Art

New Yorkers are accustomed to publicly admitting our provincialism while privately upholding the belief that we live at the center of it all. The New Museum's current exhibition "Here and… More >>

Mala Hierba Straddles Two Worlds You Wouldn't Want to Live In

McAllen, Texas, sits in the Rio Grande Valley at a crossroads of fates. Desperate migrants fleeing murderous drug wars arrive on the threshold of salvation. Magnates with shady interests on… More >>

Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies

Larry Clark's latest exhibition, "they thought i were but i aren't anymore...," is a small survey of sorts, composed of photographs, collages, and — for the first time — paintings… More >>

Fear Not: Drop Dead Perfect Won't Hurt a Bit

Idris Seabright's cottage looks idyllic. Pink paint and potted palms give her living room just the right tropical breeziness. A portrait of flinty, bearded Captain Horace Seabright hangs over her… More >>

Piece of His Heart: Bert Berns Is a Name You Need to Know

"I want to be known," says the magnetic young actor Zak Resnick, playing the part of songwriter Bert Berns. Bert who? Berns, the subject of this biographical jukebox musical, penned… More >>

Ever Hear the One About Hamlet's Mother?

"People should take Gertrude seriously," declares the queen, speaking of herself in the third person. Howard Barker's 2002 rendering of Hamlet defends the title character (Hamlet's mother), by rethinking her… More >>

Gimme Fallout Shelter: Atomic is an Epic Meltdown of a Musical

A musical about the Manhattan Project? Bring on the dancing physicists and chorus girls in lab coats. Belt out those odes to fissure. Enrich our hearts with uranium! Atomic is… More >>

The Feather Channel: The Pigeoning Isn't Only for the Birds

If you think those people in The Birds had it bad, just wait till you meet Frank, the nebbishy hero of Robin Frohardt's puppet play The Pigeoning. Now running at… More >>

Behind the German Blitzkrieg of Pop Art

How is it that the nation that vilified the avant-garde in the first half of the 20th century somehow brought forth a band of artists that propelled vanguard art into… More >>

Loading...