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  • Private Prisons

    Article

    Private Prisons

    Thomas Lanier Williams had not yet become Tennessee Williams when he wrote Not About Nightingales in 193738, though he used the name when submitting a packet of plays that included it to the Group Theater, which sensibly awarded him $100 for his one...

    by Michael Feingold on March 2, 1999
  • Article

    Solomon Wins Nathan Award

    The Voice's Alisa Solomon has been awarded the 199798 George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism for her book Re-Dressing the Canon: Essays on Theater and Gender, published by Routledge. She'll be honored at a reception on Monday, March 8, at P...

    on March 2, 1999
  • Article

    Blackburn Award Winners

    Playwright Jessica Goldberg has won first prize in the 21st annual Susan Smith Blackburn awards, for her play Refuge. The Blackburn prizes are awarded yearly to women who've written "works of outstanding quality for the English-speaking theatre." Se...

    on March 2, 1999
  • Cult Club

    Article

    Cult Club

    Perhaps it's the curse of the upstart artist: you start out all freaky and original, and end up covering the same terrain as the Eagles. Such is the case with gifted Portland, Oregon, writer Chuck Palahniuk. The message of his sophomore novel, Surviv...

    by Lily Burana on February 23, 1999
  • A Master's Legacy - NYCB Celebrates Jerome Robbins

    Article

    A Master's Legacy - NYCB Celebrates Jerome Robbins

    It's no secret that Jerome Robbins was hard on dancers. To understand that he also loved them very much, you have only to watch the New York City Ballet performing his works during its Jerome Robbins Celebration, through Sunday at the New York State ...

    by Deborah Jowitt on February 23, 1999
  • Article

    Filmmaker

    Beginning March 2, the exemplary artistry of the Paul Taylor Dance Company will be on view at City Center. Starting the next day, discover what goes into creating and perfecting Taylor's work by heading to Film Forum, where Matthew Diamond's Dancema...

    by Susan Reiter on February 23, 1999
  • Invisible Cities

    Article

    Invisible Cities

    The textual space of Berlin Alexanderplatz resembles a city." That's what the critic Harald Jhner says about Alfred Dblin's great 1929 novel. And so it does. Sir Peter Hall's Cities in Civilization is a vast city of the mind, a millennial exhibitio...

    by Iain Sinclair on February 23, 1999
  • Article

    More Bread or I'll Appear

    Emer Martin's second novel (after Breakfast in Babylon) begins in a hallucinogenic version of Frank McCourt's washed-out Ireland and winds up poolside in Hawaii, where a gay whiskey priest is recuperating after plastic surgery. In between Dublin and...

    by Jennifer Howard on February 23, 1999
  • Double Takes

    Article

    Double Takes

    Plautus, Shakespeare, Goldoni, Anouilh: Everyone loves the confusion and the occult aura generated by identical twins. It took Paula Vogel, though, to see them as a perfect image for America's peculiarly schizophrenic culture. On its surface, The Min...

    by Michael Feingold on February 23, 1999
  • Article

    Paul Schmidt - 19341999

    I first met Paul Schmidt in 1992. He was going to translate Brecht's St. Joan of the Stockyards, which I would then direct at Yale Rep. His reputation was formidable, and I went with trepidation to his apartment, standing in front of his door for a m...

    by Liz Diamond on February 23, 1999
  • Sweet Talk

    Article

    Sweet Talk

    Sentiment and edginess make strange bedfellows, whether they're shacking up in the run-down flats of Jonathan Harvey's '90s London or screwing in the tract house of Marlane Meyer's 1955 California. The measured doses of the two elements most likely t...

    by James Hannaham on February 23, 1999
  • After the Guru - Young Artists Confront Grotowski's Legacy

    Article

    After the Guru - Young Artists Confront Grotowski's Legacy

    When theatrical visionary Jerzy Grotowski died last month at 65, he left a long and distinguished legacy. Obituaries lumped him with Stanislavsky and Brecht and likened the Polish director to a Zen master. For a generation of experimental theater art...

    by Stephen Nunns on February 23, 1999
  • Article

    Apply Polish Sparingly - Martha Graham's Heritage Strides On

    A matriarch dies, and an incomparable collection of silver and china passes to her devoted heirs. Some pieces are kept in exquisite order. Others somehow develop hairline cracks. A saucer goes missing. Harsh new polish destroys a spoon's patina. Addi...

    by Deborah Jowitt on February 16, 1999
  • Article

    Uptown Girl

    Mia Michaels, whose company, Reality at Work, makes its New York debut Wednesday through Sunday at the Upper East Side's Playhouse 91, has choreographed for Prince, Gloria Estefan, and MTV's Hot Properties. Her dancers exude steely instead of noodly ...

    by Kate Mattingly on February 16, 1999
  • Pop Eyed

    Article

    Pop Eyed

    Playing the fearless leader of a marauding gang, Stacie Hirsch screws up her face into a mask of comic ferocity. Her lipsa bright red pucker painted onto a background of whitetwist like telephone wire. Her eyebrowswrought-iron curlicues drawn onto...

    by Alisa Solomon on February 16, 1999
  • The Way We Were

    Article

    The Way We Were

    I've never been much of a Jennifer Bartlett fan. Her work always seemed premiseless, muddy, and without vision; as an artist, she is more of a combiner, or an adept copyist, than a creator. Except for Rhapsody. Until last week, I only knew her epic u...

    by Jerry Saltz on February 16, 1999
  • Article

    Stitchcraft

    I don't much like my daughter sewing," the novelist Colette remarked. "She is silent, and shewhy not write down the word that frightens meshe is thinking." For centuries, needlework and knitting kept women's hands occupied while their minds worked ...

    by Leslie Camhi on February 16, 1999
  • Durable Goods

    Article

    Durable Goods

    You can quibble and you can mockI often dobut after half a century, Death of a Salesman is still viable merchandise. It's as if Arthur Miller had set out to prove his hero's assertions about the old ways and the old goods being better. Yes, in a fe...

    by Michael Feingold on February 16, 1999
  • Article

    Asian Lite

    Ethnic pride can be a dangerous thing. It can burst out in civil unrest, or, at its most bloodless, in historical pageantsbenign propaganda masquerading as drama. Making Tracks (Taipei Theater) is a display of Asian American boosterism, clunkily con...

    by Francine Russo on February 16, 1999
  • The Escape Artist

    Article

    The Escape Artist

    Alex Garland's first novel, The Beach, was and is great escape literature in every sense of the term. Written with the twenty-twentysomething clarity of a Windex-blue lagoon, Garland's tragic tale of tropical paradise found and subsequently lost in a...

    by Richard Gehr on February 16, 1999
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Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies

Larry Clark's latest exhibition, "they thought i were but i aren't anymore...," is a small survey of sorts, composed of photographs, collages, and — for the first time — paintings… More >>

Fear Not: Drop Dead Perfect Won't Hurt a Bit

Idris Seabright's cottage looks idyllic. Pink paint and potted palms give her living room just the right tropical breeziness. A portrait of flinty, bearded Captain Horace Seabright hangs over her… More >>

Piece of His Heart: Bert Berns Is a Name You Need to Know

"I want to be known," says the magnetic young actor Zak Resnick, playing the part of songwriter Bert Berns. Bert who? Berns, the subject of this biographical jukebox musical, penned… More >>

Ever Hear the One About Hamlet's Mother?

"People should take Gertrude seriously," declares the queen, speaking of herself in the third person. Howard Barker's 2002 rendering of Hamlet defends the title character (Hamlet's mother), by rethinking her… More >>

Gimme Fallout Shelter: Atomic is an Epic Meltdown of a Musical

A musical about the Manhattan Project? Bring on the dancing physicists and chorus girls in lab coats. Belt out those odes to fissure. Enrich our hearts with uranium! Atomic is… More >>

The Feather Channel: The Pigeoning Isn't Only for the Birds

If you think those people in The Birds had it bad, just wait till you meet Frank, the nebbishy hero of Robin Frohardt's puppet play The Pigeoning. Now running at… More >>

Behind the German Blitzkrieg of Pop Art

How is it that the nation that vilified the avant-garde in the first half of the 20th century somehow brought forth a band of artists that propelled vanguard art into… More >>

Rum Punch: The Qualification of Douglas Evans is a Boozy Doozy

The Qualification of Douglas Evans, a deeply compelling new play for the Amoralists by Derek Ahonen, looks at addiction without embellishment. It skips the pathos we're used to seeing in… More >>

Nicola Samori's Rereadings of Old Master Oils are a Revelation Nicola Samori's Rereadings of Old Master Oils are a Revelation

Gazing at Italian painter Nicola Samori's new work might bring to mind Auden's famous opening from "Musée des Beaux Arts": "About suffering, they were never wrong, the Old Masters." Think of… More >>

Performed in a Lounge, Play/Date Will Attempt to Set the Bar for Immersive Theater

At first glance, Fat Baby looks like any other Lower East Side bar on a weeknight. A woman waits for someone while texting impatiently. A guy on a stool engages… More >>

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