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  • Article

    Follow the Leader

    While a number of African American women in the race movement have accused their male counterparts of sexism in recent years, few have done so as authoritatively as Hazel Carby in this groundbreaking book. Critiquing the role of masculinity in the wo...

    by Maurice Berger on December 1, 1998
  • Nude Awakening

    Article

    Nude Awakening

    Fashion photographers have always flirted with nudity, partly for its uplifting echo of the classic ideal, partly for its transgressive kick in the midst of a magazine's usual expanse of overdressed flesh. But, at a moment when fashion photos seem to...

    by Vince Aletti on December 1, 1998
  • Flat Land - Richard Maxwell Sets Up House at P.S. 122

    Article

    Flat Land - Richard Maxwell Sets Up House at P.S. 122

    Richard Maxwell likes to call his plays musicals, "just to piss people off." "That's not a reason to do theater, Rich," actor Yehuda Duenyas tsks. "But why aren't they musicals?" counters Maxwell, whose curiously flat creations bear little resemblanc...

    by Margot Ebling on November 24, 1998
  • Article

    Solid Gold

    Garth Fagan doesn't need to think about creating positive images of African Americans onstage; his dance style itself is empowering. The glorious dancers he has trained come across as both passionate and profoundly cool. No attitude detracts from wha...

    by Deborah Jowitt on November 24, 1998
  • Article

    Soul Sisters

    It feels a little old-fashioned to talk about spirituality in dance, but as choreographer Dianne McIntyre points out, "it's kind of avant-garde. There hasn't been that much encouragement for the expression of spirituality in art. So to come right out...

    by Kristin Eliasberg on November 24, 1998
  • Virginia Territory

    Article

    Virginia Territory

    In his previous two novels, Michael Cunningham established himself as the preeminent chronicler of paralyzing self-consciousness. A Home at the End of the World and Flesh and Blood focused on gay men and suburban mothers, characters whose particular ...

    by David Kurnick on November 24, 1998
  • Public Relations

    Article

    Public Relations

    Our nation's current fixation with sex scandal has made it a fitting year for Federico Garca Lorca's centennial. If anything characterizes the theatrical oeuvre of this Spanish master, it's his constant exposing of the painful absurdity of society's...

    by Ed Morales on November 24, 1998
  • Article

    Natural Herstory

    I've seen the face of lesbian camp: she's the frumpy, obsessive museum guide who leads audiences through Sharon Hayes's meditation on American dyke cultures, The Lesbian (DTW). The mixed- media solo show is a delightful semi-autobiographical account...

    by Rachel Mattson on November 24, 1998
  • Article

    Making the Cut

    No one gets out of Kara Walker's world alive, not even the artist. In one of her characteristic, nearly life-size black silhouettes in cut paper, a naked black girl kneels to suck the cock of a white slaver. We're already in deep water. He has the cl...

    by Jerry Saltz on November 24, 1998
  • Article

    Elsewhere

    Tourism and photography grew up together in the 19th century, and since then have been bound in codependency. The camera became the traveler's constant companion, while in the new metropolises, photographs of far-off places fed people's desire to be ...

    by Leslie Camhi on November 24, 1998
  • A Touch of Evil

    Article

    A Touch of Evil

    The title of Giles Foden's first novel refers to Idi Amin, dictator of the central African nation of Uganda from 1971 until the Tanzanian army, and his own people, drove him from power in 1979. According to Foden's account which seems, in many of it...

    by A.O. Scott on November 24, 1998
  • Article

    The Times Square Story

    Audaciously cramming the whole gloriously cruddy mythology into a swift few pages, The Times Square Story is a site-specific sideshow to The Phantom Empire, poet-essayist Geoffrey O'Brien's entrancing reverie on the ways movies unspool in the unconsc...

    by Alyssa Katz on November 24, 1998
  • Pick a Rescue

    Article

    Pick a Rescue

    Broadway playgoers, unite. Throw away your overpriced tickets and head downtown to the Irish Rep; you have nothing to lose but your boredom. Next to the shabby, ugly, dreary procession of Uptown diversions, the works of Dionysius Lardner Boucicault, ...

    by Michael Feingold on November 24, 1998
  • Article

    Blight in August

    What do you get when a distinguished Southern novelist takes to playwriting? Feisty eccentrics and dreamy loners, down-home repartee, prophetic dreams and some of the clunkiest exposition this side of a French maid with a feather duster. Reynol...

    by Francine Russo on November 24, 1998
  • Oulipo Service - An Experimental Literary Society Invades New York

    Article

    Oulipo Service - An Experimental Literary Society Invades New York

    Harry Mathews, the experimental poet, fiction writer, and charismatic English-language ambassador of the French literary society Oulipo, swept into town last week to flog his new book, the Oulipo Compendium (Atlas, $19.99). A bearish man with the sli...

    by Jonathan Bing on November 17, 1998
  • Lion's Share - Black Concert Dancers Storm Broadway

    Article

    Lion's Share - Black Concert Dancers Storm Broadway

    One night, The Lion King's dance captain, Aubrey Lynch II, felt his troops were getting a bit lackadaisical. "Thirty to 50 years ago," he reminded them, "we were not allowed onstage without a chicken bone in our mouths." Broadway has been pretty good...

    by Deborah Jowitt on November 17, 1998
  • Article

    Being There

    Like a matador or a lion tamer, Margarita Guergu has made a career of flirting with beasts. Her knack for evoking psychic terror and knowing just when to step out of harm's way led to a Bessie in 1990. Yet lately the Barcelona-born choreographer has...

    by Christopher Reardon on November 17, 1998
  • Notes From Underground - Asian American Writers' Workshop Makes A Scene

    Article

    Notes From Underground - Asian American Writers' Workshop Makes A Scene

    Situated in a basement below the Gap on St. Marks Place, the Asian American Writers' Workshop is easy to miss. But as much as its location cries out for metaphorical abuse, the workshop is anything but underground. Since its inception in 1991, the ...

    by Hugh Garvey on November 17, 1998
  • Article

    Let Nothing You Dismay

    Mark O'Donnell's acid-tinged Christmas novel Let Nothing You Dismay becomes rather dense in its pileups of literary allusion and wordplay, but it seems churlish to complain that a book is too witty. The story of a distraught ex-teacher making the N...

    by Michael Musto on November 17, 1998
  • Can-Do Voodoo

    Article

    Can-Do Voodoo

    Gumbo's in season with two plays set among Louisiana's Cajun crew now simmering on Manhattan stages. The Women of Orleans is a full-blooded, spicy stew of a piece, bursting with authentic regional flavor though played in a nearly bare space with min...

    by Francine Russo on November 17, 1998
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From the Print Edition

Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally Shout and Weep in the Not-Bad Annapurna

Real-­life couple and stars of screen Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman storm the stage and distinguish themselves, mostly, in this duet trauma drama, one of those shows where shattered characters… More >>

Estelle Parsons Puts Up Her Dukes in The Velocity of Autumn

“Old age is no place for sissies,” Bette Davis said. Alexandra, the Molotov-cocktail–wielding grandmother at the center of Eric Coble’s The Velocity of Autumn, couldn’t agree more. Waging a war… More >>

The World Is Round Gives a Gertrude Stein Children's Story a Worthy Adaptation

Gertrude Stein’s characters have it rough. Men have the moral stature of lapdogs while women face all of life’s challenges. But such female independence — especially the kind the author… More >>

Act One is an Inspiring Chronicle of a Playwright's Determination

How do you make it big in New York when you're starting from zero? Moss Hart's 1959 autobiography, Act One, shows one path, a steep climb from poverty in the… More >>

Sigmar Polke's Aesthetic Escape Velocity on View at MoMA

Sigmar Polke was a prisoner of his childhood, as are most of us. Born in 1941, when the Nazis were at their apogee, he suffered an impoverished youth in communist… More >>

Judy Chicago Proves She's About More Than Vagina Plates at Brooklyn Museum Show Judy Chicago Proves She's About More Than Vagina Plates at Brooklyn Museum Show

Judy Chicago wears rose-colored glasses, not that she needs them. The artist behind the notoriously yonic The Dinner Party celebrates her 75th birthday this year with major museum exhibitions all… More >>

Wrenching and Racy Soul-searching in Your Mother's Copy of the Kama Sutra

Carla (Zoë Sophia Garcia) tells Reggie (Chris Stack) she'll marry him if he agrees to one thing: They both must reenact their sexual histories together. All of it — the… More >>

Hollywood Golden Boys Provide Glitter and Little Else in Two New Productions

Of all the alter egos you can picture James Franco inhabiting, is "California farmhand" one of them? Me neither. How about Daniel Radcliffe (aka Harry Potter) as a hard-luck Irishman?… More >>

Audra McDonald Brings Billie Holiday to Life in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill

Any theatergoer expecting in this revival of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill an excuse for an Audra McDonald concert won't find the singer's full-bodied, mellifluous voice here. Instead,… More >>

The Heir Apparent Brims With Linguistic Panache and Stellar Performances

"I'm a one-man Comédie-Française," boasts the scheming servant Crispin, comparing his acting skills to France's national theater. Crispin (Carson Elrod) isn't totally exaggerating: In the course of The Heir Apparent,… More >>

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