<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  105  |  ...  |  210  |  ...  |  315  |  ...  |  416  |  417  |  418  |  ...  |  420  |  421  |  Next Page >> 8321 - 8340 of 8407

  • Fine Young Animals

    Article

    Fine Young Animals

    Sharply etched portraits in movement, language, sound, shadow, and light dominate this fall's strong Fresh Tracks roster. Five of the six works on the juried program look like solos, though the best of them are genuine collaborations. Mei-Yin Ng ...

    by Elizabeth Zimmer on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Nylon Venus

    Eric Dunlap, choreographer of Forward, pushes Alwin Nikolais's style into a kinky realm in Gion: the Sense of Skin (House of Candles, through November 22). Collaborator Holly Daggers drenches the cramped space with techno-ambient sound and an environ...

    by Chris Dohse on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Millennium Moves

    The first section of Murray Louis's new dance, Millennium Loop, looks like a tribute to his late partner, Alwin Nikolais. Dancers sheathed in translucent unitards manipulate modular segments of a metallic fence before a polka-dotted scrim. They lunge...

    by Chris Dohse on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Boyle Wonder

    Tn. Coraghessan Boyle has always worn his ego on his sleeve. From the earliest days of his career, he has taken on material most writers won't go near, doing so with a look-at-me grandeur of both conception and style. In his 1987 novel World's End, h...

    by David L. Ulin on November 10, 1998
  • A Model Life

    Article

    A Model Life

    I knew there was something sad, something deeply disgusting, about this whole modeling business," writes Waris Dirie in her autobiography, Desert Flower, recalling her first assignment posing nude for an art calendar. In plain, sweet prose, Dirie,...

    by Lynn Yaeger on November 10, 1998
  • He'll Go On - John Turturro Plays Beckett's Serious Games

    Article

    He'll Go On - John Turturro Plays Beckett's Serious Games

    John Turturro is fussing with his hat. But there's nothing trivial about his consternation: he's preparing to play Estragon in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot at the Classic Stage Company, and anyone familiar with the play knows the Laurel and Har...

    by David Yaffe on November 10, 1998
  • Trial and Era

    Article

    Trial and Era

    You can hardly compress a life into a two-hour play. One as rich with highs and lows as that of anthropologist and author Zora Neale Hurston her trajectory from the backwoods to the pinnacle of the Harlem Renaissance, then to slander and obscurity ...

    by James Hannaham on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Gothic Revival

    If you want to take the fake-blood spirit and extend Halloween into a mini-season, then Frankenweiner (The Piano Store) is for you. A spoof on Frankenstein, the musical finds inspiration in Pygmalion spiced with Medusa imagine a kinkier, campier ver...

    by Kaelen Wilson-Goldie on November 10, 1998
  • Three Easy Pieces

    Article

    Three Easy Pieces

    In the old days, Broadway-goers called them "nice little plays" tidy, sequential, small-scale items about a crisis in the life of one little group. The matinee ladies adored them; men often felt out of place at them. Terence Rattigan, who wrote seve...

    by Michael Feingold on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    The Dobie Brothers

    Who is the title figure in Dobie McDobie (Flea Theater)? We'll never find out, because the alleged character in this faux narrative is an empty shell in a demented con game where the playing pieces are hollowed-out media formats: ad pitch, bio, TV n...

    by Francine Russo on November 10, 1998
  • The Rapture

    Article

    The Rapture

    Donna Minkowitz's Ferocious Romance was especially helpful to me because I've been worried my loss of interest in sado-masochism means I'm not cool anymore. Like her, I'm amazed to learn that love is subtler than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick....

    on November 3, 1998
  • With the Little People

    Article

    With the Little People

    A fairy shoe was brought to America by an Irish writer in the 1920s. Examination under a microscope at Harvard revealed tiny hand stitches, and the leather was identified as mouseskin. Sixty years earlier, an obscure Victorian artist, John Anster F...

    by Leslie Camhi on November 3, 1998
  • Article

    It's the Shit

    London There are several intelligent, deftly installed shows up in the city right now, including one of Picasso's ceramic work at the Royal Academy, the Aubrey Beardsley centenary exhibition at the Victoria & Albert, and the Hayward Gallery's "Addr...

    by Vince Aletti on November 3, 1998
  • Feel the Burn

    Article

    Feel the Burn

    Sometimes the quietest images sear the mind. As Incidents, the first of Ronald K. Brown's three programs, begins, a woman (Torya Beard) sits on the floor, her head in Dafinah Blacksher's lap, while Blacksher plucks something--thorns, maybe--out of he...

    by Deborah Jowitt on November 3, 1998
  • Article

    Helgi Heaven

    Here's a thought, looking toward the year 2000. Perhaps ballet is returning to the pre-Balanchinian era, when star dancing took precedence over star choreography. This idea is prompted by American Ballet Theater's past spring season at the Met and t...

    by Nancy Goldner on November 3, 1998
  • California Scheming

    Article

    California Scheming

    While Olympia Greene, the lightweight champion of the world, barks insults after knocking out a male competitor, her husband Rudolph sits meekly in the corner sewing. Ever since Mother Hubbard's revolutionary takeover of California, men have become s...

    by Charles McNulty on November 3, 1998
  • Article

    Last Call

    In the midst of William Saroyan's The Time of Your Life (Chain Lightning Theatre), McCarthy, an intellectual longshoreman, offers his critique of a would-be comedian's dance. "It's awful," he proclaims, "but it's honest and ambitious." Much the...

    by Alexis Soloski on November 3, 1998
  • Article

    Reefer Madness

    There is another political party making waves this November, if the size of the crowd that met gubernatorial candidate Tom Leighton last Wednesday at the Jan Hus Church on East 74th Street is any indication. The Marijuana Reform Party may sound like ...

    by Frank Ruscitti on November 3, 1998
  • Zombie Aerobics

    Article

    Zombie Aerobics

    Footloose is sad because its intentions are so good: It's like a well-meaning child trying to teach a lame dog to jump through hoops. Visions of commercial success may be floating through the child's head, but that doesn't erase the good it wanted to...

    by Michael Feingold on November 3, 1998
  • Article

    Vegging Out

    When you write badly about passion, you get pulp; with politics, you grind out sawdust. Maybe that's why The Life and Times of Ng Chung-Yin (Theater for the New City) is so utterly devoid of juice when the Hong Kong radical's life seemed to burst w...

    by Francine Russo on November 3, 1998
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  105  |  ...  |  210  |  ...  |  315  |  ...  |  416  |  417  |  418  |  ...  |  420  |  421  |  Next Page >> 8321 - 8340 of 8407

Find an Arts Event

New York Event Tickets

From the Print Edition

Audra McDonald Brings Billie Holiday to Life in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill

Any theatergoer expecting in this revival of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill an excuse for an Audra McDonald concert won't find the singer's full-bodied, mellifluous voice here. Instead,… More >>

The Heir Apparent Brims With Linguistic Panache and Stellar Performances

"I'm a one-man Comédie-Française," boasts the scheming servant Crispin, comparing his acting skills to France's national theater. Crispin (Carson Elrod) isn't totally exaggerating: In the course of The Heir Apparent,… More >>

Photographic Fiction and Fact in the LES Photographic Fiction and Fact in the LES

Within a block of each other on the Lower East Side, two photographers who dig into genres we thought we already knew — Heather Bennett uses self-portraiture to don various… More >>

Shameless and Uncharismatic, Bullets Over Broadway Loses The Sophistication of Its Source Material

Bullets Over Broadway is an old-fashioned musical, if for you the term "old-fashioned" connotes a version of 1920s New York in which Italian-American stereotypes are the only ethnic other, most… More >>

Infidelity and Architecture Underpin the Meditative Isolde

Richard Maxwell’s new play is about myth, memory, and a house that never gets built. Lighter and more sardonic than the playwright-director’s recent work (especially 2013’s densely poetic Neutral Hero),… More >>

Scott Z. Burns and Steven Soderbergh Team Up For Post-Colombine Psychological Mystery The Library

Audiences today need little urging to accept age- and color-blind casting on the stage, but Steven Soderbergh and Scott Z. Burns's life-in-the-aftermath drama The Library perhaps pushes viewers to accept… More >>

A Hilarious Ride Through the Inner Workings of a Small Town Arts Council in The Most Deserving

Sotheby's and Christie's may have cornered the real-world market for bitchiness and backstabbing in the name of art, but in The Most Deserving, Catherine Trieschmann's newest play, produced by Women's… More >>

Will Eno and Lorraine Hansberry Write Home in Two New Productions

Is New York theater suffering a housing crisis? How else to explain the glut of this season's plays (Fun Home, The Open House, A Doll's House, The Tribute Artist, The… More >>

Beautiful and Violent Art from the Civil Rights Movement at New Brooklyn Museum Show Witness

Something is terribly wrong with the sedan in this black-and-white photo: The doors gape open, glass is shattered, dark drips trail down the seat back. In 1965, civil rights activist… More >>

Rich Visual Schemes Undermine Dramatic Subtlety in The Threepenny Opera

The Threepenny Opera, now at Atlantic Theater, is no conventional, rough-hewn beggars' tale. For this staging, director Martha Clarke applies her sophisticated visual sensibilities to Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's… More >>

Loading...