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  • Article

    Word Up

    Stephen Petronio's 70-minute kinetic meditation on time, Not Garden, which opens Tuesday at the Joyce Theater, relies on word and body. In Amherst, Massachusetts, last month, much of the movement was swallowed up in the stylish staging, a problem tha...

    by H.B. Kronen on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Bridge Work - Brooklyn's New Alternative Theater

    Walk down Williamsburg's North 6th Street and you may notice a purple light shining on the front of a brick warehouse. Push through the building's metal door, and you'll find yourself on a catwalk that borders a huge area filled with water. The shall...

    by Stephen Nunns on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Midtown Tragedy

    Those of you who just tuned in probably think my headline alludes to Sophocles's play. On the other hand, my regular readersall junior partners with the fine old firm of Hypocrite Lecteur, Semblable & Frereprobably assume it's a setup for rude rema...

    by Michael Feingold on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Fateful Love

    Diana Son's Stop Kiss (Public Theater) jangles and crackles like a clangorous New York street on a summer night; it bristles with cynical asides and wiseass retorts as it follows the meeting and mating of two women. Callie is the quintessential ...

    by Francine Russo on December 15, 1998
  • The Screens - All the World's a Cyber Stage: The State of Online Theater

    Article

    The Screens - All the World's a Cyber Stage: The State of Online Theater

    Watery-looking clouds move haltingly across the computer screen. The Net-fed image, pixilating frequently into tiny, painterly cubes of digital cumulus, delights Rae C. Wright, the author of Art Thief a live performance made accessible to screens in...

    by Jessica Chalmers on December 8, 1998
  • Going Gold

    Article

    Going Gold

    On October 11, 1948, Lincoln Kirstein's Ballet Society (two years old and boasting 800 subscribers) became the New York City Ballet. During its somewhat shaky first season at City Center half-filled houses at performances relegated to Monday and Tu...

    by Deborah Jowitt on December 8, 1998
  • Article

    Brain Wave

    It's been so long since Ballett Frankfurt graced these shores that artistic director William Forsythe is known to many here only by his reputation as a radical wunderkind and heir to Balanchine. Recent commissions for the San Francisco Ballet and New...

    by Christopher Reardon on December 8, 1998
  • Article

    Old School Tie - Powell Puts Down Roots (and Sends Up Shoots) at Ailey

    Ailey dancer Troy O'Neil Powell, whose first choreography premieres next week at City Center, was nine years old the youngest in a family of six when company representatives came to East Harlem's P.S. 50 looking for a few good kids. They picked Pow...

    by Elizabeth Zimmer on December 8, 1998
  • School of Paris

    Article

    School of Paris

    Ever since New York supposedly stole the idea of modern art from Paris, we've tended to think of that former center of the art world as a loser. It was, however, never really a matter of theft. Modernism more or less packed itself up and emigrated he...

    by Kim Levin on December 8, 1998
  • Article

    War and Peace

    Hiroshi Sugito, 28, loves painting and painting alone. This makes him unique among the high-tech, hard-edge, Pop-oriented wizards who have emerged from Japan in the last decade. Sugito's depictions of a blissful, make-believe world marred by an alm...

    by Jerry Saltz on December 8, 1998
  • Broadways and Means

    Article

    Broadways and Means

    In another era, on a different Broadway, I might not be so enthused about this revival of On the Town; you'll find quibbles in plenty below. But why kid ourselves? If a musical's supposed to transport you to another world, I'd rather be in the world ...

    by Michael Feingold on December 8, 1998
  • Article

    Cagey

    Come view the monster on Death Row. He's safe step closer . . . closer. . . . In So, I Killed a Few People . . . (Piano Store), writers David Summers (who performs) and Gary Ruderman (who directs) play with the distance emotional, metaphorical, and...

    by Francine Russo on December 8, 1998
  • Article

    Heaven Knows

    Wolfgang Tillmans's third exhibition in New York is his best. He's moving beyond one of the more ubiquitous aesthetics of the 1990s, one he helped establish: the anything-young-is-good school of photography, an outgrowth of the apotheosis-of-the-snap...

    by Jerry Saltz on December 1, 1998
  • Days of the Dead

    Article

    Days of the Dead

    For better or worse, my being was permanently altered by my adolescent encounter with the Grateful Dead in the early 1980s. Murky days for the band for sure, but the shows my teenage drug buddies and I caught throughout California poured psychedelic ...

    by Erik Davis on December 1, 1998
  • Article

    Rich and Strange - Three Women Ignite Asian Traditions

    Two men smooth their hands over each other's bodies. They slide into an embrace, interlocking as formally as the twin halves of a yin/yang symbol. What makes their actions startling on the stage of the BAM Majestica stamping ground, after all, of av...

    by Deborah Jowitt on December 1, 1998
  • Freeway Threeway

    Article

    Freeway Threeway

    The gay-guystraight-woman friendship device is an unfortunately resilient clich. But Snakebit (Naked Angels), in which Michael and Jennifer are the platonic friends wondering what it is with men, deserves to be cut some slack, since author David Ma...

    by Sightlines on December 1, 1998
  • Article

    Diva-lution

    Sandra Bernhards one-woman show, I'm Still Here...Damn It!, reminds me of a comment a friend made about Nathan Lane after leaving Mizlansky/Zilinsky at intermission: "He's like a spice, not a meal." Bernhard also has the character actor's curse. T...

    by James Hannaham on December 1, 1998
  • Article

    Needlework

    Trainspotting (Players Theatre), director Harry Gibson's bleak adaptation of the Irvine Welsh novel, drips with all the gritty gross-outs and drug- addled philosophies of its source. It even has all the plummiest linessays one character of his deale...

    by Alexis Soloski on December 1, 1998
  • Article

    Def Jam

    I don't define improvisation," says Sondra Loring, curator of the seventh annual Improvisation Festival/NY. "I leave that to the artists." More than 80 from around the world will appear in a two-week blitz of performances, jams, classes, workshops,...

    by Jody Sperling on December 1, 1998
  • Felt and Unfelt

    Article

    Felt and Unfelt

    When Waiting for Godot arrived in America in 1956, even amid the glossy materialism of boom-time suburbia its barren landscape seemed a natural reflection of the barren spiritual landscape of the era. What made Godot's influence spread with such amaz...

    by Michael Feingold on December 1, 1998
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Dishonorable Recharge: Preston Sturges Deserves Better

"I've always been sensible and good," cries Isabelle Parry (Keilly McQuail), a Southern belle getting her first taste of the wicked big city. Now our ingenue just wants to drink… More >>

The New Museum Assembles a Staggering Show of Arab Art The New Museum Assembles a Staggering Show of Arab Art

New Yorkers are accustomed to publicly admitting our provincialism while privately upholding the belief that we live at the center of it all. The New Museum's current exhibition "Here and… More >>

Mala Hierba Straddles Two Worlds You Wouldn't Want to Live In

McAllen, Texas, sits in the Rio Grande Valley at a crossroads of fates. Desperate migrants fleeing murderous drug wars arrive on the threshold of salvation. Magnates with shady interests on… More >>

Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies

Larry Clark's latest exhibition, "they thought i were but i aren't anymore...," is a small survey of sorts, composed of photographs, collages, and — for the first time — paintings… More >>

Fear Not: Drop Dead Perfect Won't Hurt a Bit

Idris Seabright's cottage looks idyllic. Pink paint and potted palms give her living room just the right tropical breeziness. A portrait of flinty, bearded Captain Horace Seabright hangs over her… More >>

Piece of His Heart: Bert Berns Is a Name You Need to Know

"I want to be known," says the magnetic young actor Zak Resnick, playing the part of songwriter Bert Berns. Bert who? Berns, the subject of this biographical jukebox musical, penned… More >>

Ever Hear the One About Hamlet's Mother?

"People should take Gertrude seriously," declares the queen, speaking of herself in the third person. Howard Barker's 2002 rendering of Hamlet defends the title character (Hamlet's mother), by rethinking her… More >>

Gimme Fallout Shelter: Atomic is an Epic Meltdown of a Musical

A musical about the Manhattan Project? Bring on the dancing physicists and chorus girls in lab coats. Belt out those odes to fissure. Enrich our hearts with uranium! Atomic is… More >>

The Feather Channel: The Pigeoning Isn't Only for the Birds

If you think those people in The Birds had it bad, just wait till you meet Frank, the nebbishy hero of Robin Frohardt's puppet play The Pigeoning. Now running at… More >>

Behind the German Blitzkrieg of Pop Art

How is it that the nation that vilified the avant-garde in the first half of the 20th century somehow brought forth a band of artists that propelled vanguard art into… More >>

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