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  • Going Dutch

    Article

    Going Dutch

    While the Booker prize given to Amsterdam last month honors the year's "best novel" by a writer from the old British Empire, Ian McEwan's natural milieu is not Britannia but Europe: he writes books that are ready for export, embodying the progressive...

    by Paul Elie on December 22, 1998
  • Article

    The Hellbox

    To hell with poetry:/life's more important," declares Greg Delanty in The Hellbox, his fourth collection of poems. This half-truth is less a dismissal than a riff on the dispute between living fully and thinking deeply, and between physical and intel...

    by Diane Mehta on December 22, 1998
  • Let It Drip

    Article

    Let It Drip

    Get ready to have your eyes rewired. For all the artist's ups and downs, the Jackson Pollock retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art is one of the greatest exhibitions of a 20th-century artist to be seen in a New York museum. This show comes at a t...

    by Jerry Saltz on December 22, 1998
  • Article

    Home Ech

    Perfect homes, deranged women amid the opulence of postwar suburbia, wives maintained facades of placid domesticity while controlling everything from their husbands' careers to the color of their draperies. Their houses were extensions of their bod...

    by Leslie Camhi on December 22, 1998
  • Sightlines

    Article

    Sightlines

    Strip Polka As actors in the theater of postindustrial economy, we're all called upon to do a little song and dance to conceal the roots of our collective pathos. We're all former child stars bludgeoned by the ugly reality of celebrity culture and r...

    on December 22, 1998
  • Jingle Hells - Kiki and Herb's Blight Christmas

    Article

    Jingle Hells - Kiki and Herb's Blight Christmas

    When boozy lounge lizard Kiki reels into a room, she's this close to a nervous breakdown. Kiki now appearing in Do You Hear What We Hear? at P.S. 122 is the damaged alter ego of Justin Bond, and her entrance is merely the beginning of trouble. Thea...

    by Laurie Stone on December 22, 1998
  • Article

    Heads and Tales

    Twenty-foot tall, papier-mch puppets can do no wrong. Let them recite stilted dialogue, let their movement vocabulary be limited to a shuffle and wave, let them read boring excerpts from The Communist Manifesto: it's absolutely delightful. Theater...

    by Alexis Soloski on December 22, 1998
  • Guare the Heart Is

    Article

    Guare the Heart Is

    All great plays, they say, are about love the countless ways people care for each other, and the equally countless terrible things they do to, by, for, with, or at each other because they care. Since John Guare writes about people who care who do s...

    by Michael Feingold on December 22, 1998
  • Article

    Digital Wonderground

    The new Philip GlassRobert Wilson collaboration, Monsters of Grace (BAM), is an important experiment in virtual theater. A computer-animated 70mm film visible only through 3-D glasses, Monsters is about perception itself. The very first scene appear...

    by C. Carr on December 22, 1998
  • Article

    View Finders - The Seasons Best Photo Books

    Gift books, especially photographic ones, should be about pleasureabout that delicate balance of sensual and intellectual stimulation you'll find nowhere else but in the pages of a big picture book spread open in your lap. It's the sort of pleasure ...

    by Vince Aletti on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Listen Up!

    The flamenco dancer duels with the floor. The Irish step dancer gives it an airy bit of slap and tickle. The tap dancer teases sounds out of it, playing the wood like a big instrument, listening to the way a light brush sounds after a no- nonsense as...

    by Deborah Jowitt on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Gypsy Blues

    When as a child I misbehaved, my mother's ultimate threat was to send me packing to the gypsies. Certainly she couldn't have had in mind the kind of gypsies who inhabit Ramon Oller's Bury Me Standing, a world premiere presented by Ballet Hispanico on...

    by Nancy Goldner on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Word Up

    Stephen Petronio's 70-minute kinetic meditation on time, Not Garden, which opens Tuesday at the Joyce Theater, relies on word and body. In Amherst, Massachusetts, last month, much of the movement was swallowed up in the stylish staging, a problem tha...

    by H.B. Kronen on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Bridge Work - Brooklyn's New Alternative Theater

    Walk down Williamsburg's North 6th Street and you may notice a purple light shining on the front of a brick warehouse. Push through the building's metal door, and you'll find yourself on a catwalk that borders a huge area filled with water. The shall...

    by Stephen Nunns on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Midtown Tragedy

    Those of you who just tuned in probably think my headline alludes to Sophocles's play. On the other hand, my regular readersall junior partners with the fine old firm of Hypocrite Lecteur, Semblable & Frereprobably assume it's a setup for rude rema...

    by Michael Feingold on December 15, 1998
  • Article

    Fateful Love

    Diana Son's Stop Kiss (Public Theater) jangles and crackles like a clangorous New York street on a summer night; it bristles with cynical asides and wiseass retorts as it follows the meeting and mating of two women. Callie is the quintessential ...

    by Francine Russo on December 15, 1998
  • The Screens - All the World's a Cyber Stage: The State of Online Theater

    Article

    The Screens - All the World's a Cyber Stage: The State of Online Theater

    Watery-looking clouds move haltingly across the computer screen. The Net-fed image, pixilating frequently into tiny, painterly cubes of digital cumulus, delights Rae C. Wright, the author of Art Thief a live performance made accessible to screens in...

    by Jessica Chalmers on December 8, 1998
  • Going Gold

    Article

    Going Gold

    On October 11, 1948, Lincoln Kirstein's Ballet Society (two years old and boasting 800 subscribers) became the New York City Ballet. During its somewhat shaky first season at City Center half-filled houses at performances relegated to Monday and Tu...

    by Deborah Jowitt on December 8, 1998
  • Article

    Brain Wave

    It's been so long since Ballett Frankfurt graced these shores that artistic director William Forsythe is known to many here only by his reputation as a radical wunderkind and heir to Balanchine. Recent commissions for the San Francisco Ballet and New...

    by Christopher Reardon on December 8, 1998
  • Article

    Old School Tie - Powell Puts Down Roots (and Sends Up Shoots) at Ailey

    Ailey dancer Troy O'Neil Powell, whose first choreography premieres next week at City Center, was nine years old the youngest in a family of six when company representatives came to East Harlem's P.S. 50 looking for a few good kids. They picked Pow...

    by Elizabeth Zimmer on December 8, 1998
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Five Decades of James Lee Byars's "Perf" on Display at MoMA PS1 Five Decades of James Lee Byars's "Perf" on Display at MoMA PS1

James Lee Byars was an artist possessed of certain elegance. He dressed impeccably in silk or linen suits, velvet or gold lamé, often custom-made by a tailor who called himself… More >>

And I and Silence Strikes a Too-Familiar Chord

In a month when American race relations appear to have reached a historic low, the subject matter of Naomi Wallace's And I and Silence — an interracial love story with… More >>

War Animals: Nancy Rubins Goes Once More Into the Playground

You can hardly pass a toy store these days without thinking of Jeff Koons. Mr. Porcelain Smile has so deeply incorporated children's playthings into his massive Whitney survey — those… More >>

Poor Behavior is a Moral Lecture Delivered by Terrible People

"Peter is one of my oldest friends," says Maureen (Heidi Armbruster). Her hand clasps her collar to underline her moral certainty, but we're not at all convinced. Just a moment… More >>

<I>Useless</i> Is Hardley Naive About Human Trafficking Useless Is Hardley Naive About Human Trafficking

Pigs shriek. We hear the squealing herds of swine as they face the knife — part of a massive culling to control the spread of a virus. These earsplitting, nerve-jangling… More >>

Art for Film's Sake: Celluloid Characters, Real Paintings

In 1992, I owed a favor to a production designer in the film industry, and he asked me to create a series of paintings for the character of a penniless… More >>

The Maids Brings Downtown Theater to the Lincoln Center Festival

It seems fitting that any production of The Maids — the play that launched what came to be known as Theater of the Absurd — should be somewhat absurd itself.… More >>

Phoenix Is a Brittle Romantic Comedy Revived by the Rattlestick

When is a one-night stand not a one-night stand? When it leads to the abortion clinic. That is, according to Scott Organ's Phoenix, a brittle romantic comedy revived by the… More >>

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