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  • For Better or Verse

    Article

    For Better or Verse

    Can iambic pentameter save the world? Or at least its stages? The newly formed Inverse Theater so reckons. The group's mission statement promises "to transform world theater by developing and presenting new American verse plays" that "explore the Ame...

    by Alisa Solomon on November 17, 1998
  • Article

    A Jewish Saint

    The strange tale of Edith Stein the Jewish-born nun killed in Auschwitz who this year was canonized a saint presents a cornucopia of dramatic conflict. Beyond the guilt of converting to Catholicism in an age of Christian persecution of Jews, th...

    by Charles McNulty on November 17, 1998
  • Less Easy Pieces

    Article

    Less Easy Pieces

    Karl Philipp Emanuel Bach, I think, was the son who always wrote to old Johann Sebastian, begging his dad to give up all that dreary counterpoint, and try something hip like a fantasia for a change. Papa Bach paid no attention, but went fuguing on hi...

    by Michael Feingold on November 17, 1998
  • Article

    Toy Stories

    As gusts of wind bluster menacingly, gauzy curtains burst apart. The footlights reveal a plane that banks, spins, falters, and finally crashes into the Adirondacks. What has become of Lawrence, its playboy pilot? Detective Pamela Forrest isn't sure,...

    by Alexis Soloski on November 17, 1998
  • New York (Old) School

    Article

    New York (Old) School

    They say art knows no boundaries, and that it can transcend the coarse materialism of class and caste. What better way to test this thesis than to tour the Jackson Pollock retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art with one of Pollock's unacknowledged...

    by Richard Goldstein on November 17, 1998
  • Article

    Mr. Clean

    As we grow older, we eagerly anticipate such moments of low-wattage sublimity as those that come from getting the kitchen really clean sparkling and smelling slightly of bleach. Such familiar, unsung domestic bliss is the source of George Stoll'...

    by Bill Arning on November 17, 1998
  • Article

    Voice Authors

    Grown Up All Wrong: 75 Great Rock and Pop Artists From Vaudeville to Techno By Robert Christgau Harvard, 495 pp., $29.95 Robert Christgau loves rock--its fans, its "big beat," and last (but not most) the musicians themselves--and he loves rock...

    on November 10, 1998
  • Life On Mars - Exploring Roger Newton's Universe

    Article

    Life On Mars - Exploring Roger Newton's Universe

    Newton makes photos that look like nothing so much as pure phenomena explosive abstractions in black and white that give the viewer no reference point in the physical world. It's as if his camera, lost in space, recorded the boiling cosmic stew or d...

    by Vince Aletti on November 10, 1998
  • Fine Young Animals

    Article

    Fine Young Animals

    Sharply etched portraits in movement, language, sound, shadow, and light dominate this fall's strong Fresh Tracks roster. Five of the six works on the juried program look like solos, though the best of them are genuine collaborations. Mei-Yin Ng ...

    by Elizabeth Zimmer on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Nylon Venus

    Eric Dunlap, choreographer of Forward, pushes Alwin Nikolais's style into a kinky realm in Gion: the Sense of Skin (House of Candles, through November 22). Collaborator Holly Daggers drenches the cramped space with techno-ambient sound and an environ...

    by Chris Dohse on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Millennium Moves

    The first section of Murray Louis's new dance, Millennium Loop, looks like a tribute to his late partner, Alwin Nikolais. Dancers sheathed in translucent unitards manipulate modular segments of a metallic fence before a polka-dotted scrim. They lunge...

    by Chris Dohse on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Boyle Wonder

    Tn. Coraghessan Boyle has always worn his ego on his sleeve. From the earliest days of his career, he has taken on material most writers won't go near, doing so with a look-at-me grandeur of both conception and style. In his 1987 novel World's End, h...

    by David L. Ulin on November 10, 1998
  • A Model Life

    Article

    A Model Life

    I knew there was something sad, something deeply disgusting, about this whole modeling business," writes Waris Dirie in her autobiography, Desert Flower, recalling her first assignment posing nude for an art calendar. In plain, sweet prose, Dirie,...

    by Lynn Yaeger on November 10, 1998
  • He'll Go On - John Turturro Plays Beckett's Serious Games

    Article

    He'll Go On - John Turturro Plays Beckett's Serious Games

    John Turturro is fussing with his hat. But there's nothing trivial about his consternation: he's preparing to play Estragon in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot at the Classic Stage Company, and anyone familiar with the play knows the Laurel and Har...

    by David Yaffe on November 10, 1998
  • Trial and Era

    Article

    Trial and Era

    You can hardly compress a life into a two-hour play. One as rich with highs and lows as that of anthropologist and author Zora Neale Hurston her trajectory from the backwoods to the pinnacle of the Harlem Renaissance, then to slander and obscurity ...

    by James Hannaham on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    Gothic Revival

    If you want to take the fake-blood spirit and extend Halloween into a mini-season, then Frankenweiner (The Piano Store) is for you. A spoof on Frankenstein, the musical finds inspiration in Pygmalion spiced with Medusa imagine a kinkier, campier ver...

    by Kaelen Wilson-Goldie on November 10, 1998
  • Three Easy Pieces

    Article

    Three Easy Pieces

    In the old days, Broadway-goers called them "nice little plays" tidy, sequential, small-scale items about a crisis in the life of one little group. The matinee ladies adored them; men often felt out of place at them. Terence Rattigan, who wrote seve...

    by Michael Feingold on November 10, 1998
  • Article

    The Dobie Brothers

    Who is the title figure in Dobie McDobie (Flea Theater)? We'll never find out, because the alleged character in this faux narrative is an empty shell in a demented con game where the playing pieces are hollowed-out media formats: ad pitch, bio, TV n...

    by Francine Russo on November 10, 1998
  • The Rapture

    Article

    The Rapture

    Donna Minkowitz's Ferocious Romance was especially helpful to me because I've been worried my loss of interest in sado-masochism means I'm not cool anymore. Like her, I'm amazed to learn that love is subtler than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick....

    on November 3, 1998
  • With the Little People

    Article

    With the Little People

    A fairy shoe was brought to America by an Irish writer in the 1920s. Examination under a microscope at Harvard revealed tiny hand stitches, and the leather was identified as mouseskin. Sixty years earlier, an obscure Victorian artist, John Anster F...

    by Leslie Camhi on November 3, 1998
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Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies Of Course Larry Clark's Art Show is Full of Bare Teenage Bodies

Larry Clark's latest exhibition, "they thought i were but i aren't anymore...," is a small survey of sorts, composed of photographs, collages, and — for the first time — paintings… More >>

Fear Not: Drop Dead Perfect Won't Hurt a Bit

Idris Seabright's cottage looks idyllic. Pink paint and potted palms give her living room just the right tropical breeziness. A portrait of flinty, bearded Captain Horace Seabright hangs over her… More >>

Piece of His Heart: Bert Berns Is a Name You Need to Know

"I want to be known," says the magnetic young actor Zak Resnick, playing the part of songwriter Bert Berns. Bert who? Berns, the subject of this biographical jukebox musical, penned… More >>

Ever Hear the One About Hamlet's Mother?

"People should take Gertrude seriously," declares the queen, speaking of herself in the third person. Howard Barker's 2002 rendering of Hamlet defends the title character (Hamlet's mother), by rethinking her… More >>

Gimme Fallout Shelter: Atomic is an Epic Meltdown of a Musical

A musical about the Manhattan Project? Bring on the dancing physicists and chorus girls in lab coats. Belt out those odes to fissure. Enrich our hearts with uranium! Atomic is… More >>

The Feather Channel: The Pigeoning Isn't Only for the Birds

If you think those people in The Birds had it bad, just wait till you meet Frank, the nebbishy hero of Robin Frohardt's puppet play The Pigeoning. Now running at… More >>

Behind the German Blitzkrieg of Pop Art

How is it that the nation that vilified the avant-garde in the first half of the 20th century somehow brought forth a band of artists that propelled vanguard art into… More >>

Rum Punch: The Qualification of Douglas Evans is a Boozy Doozy

The Qualification of Douglas Evans, a deeply compelling new play for the Amoralists by Derek Ahonen, looks at addiction without embellishment. It skips the pathos we're used to seeing in… More >>

Nicola Samori's Rereadings of Old Master Oils are a Revelation Nicola Samori's Rereadings of Old Master Oils are a Revelation

Gazing at Italian painter Nicola Samori's new work might bring to mind Auden's famous opening from "Musée des Beaux Arts": "About suffering, they were never wrong, the Old Masters." Think of… More >>

Performed in a Lounge, Play/Date Will Attempt to Set the Bar for Immersive Theater

At first glance, Fat Baby looks like any other Lower East Side bar on a weeknight. A woman waits for someone while texting impatiently. A guy on a stool engages… More >>

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