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Anderson Tepper

Latest Stories

  • 8 years ago

    "Call me Zits," the half-Indian, foster-kid narrator of Sherman Alexie's new novel, Flight, blurts out right away. "Everyone calls me Zits." Though not quite as resonant as "Call me Ishmael," it's an opening to get our attention, and Alexie wastes...

  • 9 years ago

    It's tempting to generalize after reading three recent books from the southern tip of Latin America. What do they tell us about the continent and its literature today? Yet what is most interesting is what the books tell us about themselves: that t...

  • 10 years ago

    The Hawaiian writer Lois-Ann Yamanaka has a voice that erupts on the page. Stirring, haunting, soaring: She sets off sparks with every book, each one a new chapter from the life of the islands. There was the salty humor and in-your-face pidgin of ...

  • 10 years ago

    Caryl Phillips begins Dancing in the Dark, his eighth novel, with a hypnotic stroll through the shadows of Harlem. "If you walk down Seventh Avenue today he is a man who never existed," he whispers. Slowly, a figure comes to life: Bert Williams, t...

  • 10 years ago

    Even without knowing what a "Karoo boy" is, you can tell by the Technicolor cover of Troy Blacklaws's debut that you're in for sensory overload. It's a riotous vision of 1976 Cape Town, South Africa—the smoking barbecue braai, the car-dodging...

  • 10 years ago

    In Siddhartha Deb's peripatetic second novel, Amrit Singh, a young but prematurely jaded journalist with the Calcutta paper The Sentinel, is looking for a way out: out of Calcutta, the routine of newspaper reporting, the darkness of his gloomy off...