rss Email Author Michael Feingold

Awards

  • 2010 - The Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism/Columbia University

    Theater Reviews

2004 Stories by Michael Feingold

Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998
  • Pre-War Fashions

    published July 6, 2004

    Happy families are all alike, but every adaptation of War and Peace is unhappy after its own fashion. People have been struggling for three... More >>

  • In This Context, Cleopatra Herself Might Get Disoriented

    published July 6, 2004

    Theatre-Atelier's adaptation of Alexander Pushkin's unfinished novella Egyptian Nights, an even more problematic work for stage purposes... More >>

  • Theater

    published July 6, 2004

    Unmistakably, Rezo Gabriadze's Forbidden Christmas, or the Doctor and the Patient takes the prize for the most inane work to premiere in... More >>

  • Wilder Than You Knew

    published June 22, 2004

    One reason I have no faith in the avant-garde as a phenomenon—I have faith in artists, some of whom are considered avant-garde, but that's... More >>

  • Dad's Morals or Son's Trauma: Whose Action Is This Anyway?

    published June 22, 2004

    Jeffrey Sweet's The Action Against Sol Schumann is a play tragically locked in combat with itself. Its title evokes a somber, dispassionate... More >>

  • Unknotting Nottage

    published June 15, 2004

    When an African American woman in a Lynn Nottage play worries about her roots, she's more likely to mean her hairdo than her ethnic heritage. The... More >>

  • Observing a Drone Go Stir-Crazy: Is That Drama or Psych Lab?

    published June 15, 2004

    Living the simple life in Idaho is somebody's fantasy in Boise, but not the hero's. He acquires it secondhand, like much else of what he... More >>

  • Moliere in the Dark

    published June 8, 2004

    Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, called Molière, was one of the canniest theater artists who ever lived. At age 52, racked by ailments, hounded by... More >>

  • The Director's Edit: Dunlop Watches a Good German Go Bad

    published June 8, 2004

    It's hard to imagine, now, the days when short fiction published in a magazine could cause a national sensation, but such was the case in 1939,... More >>

  • Oldness but Goodness

    published June 1, 2004

    People complain that the theater audience is too old. I suspect the main reason, other than high ticket prices, is that the plays are too new.... More >>

  • For Sore Eyes

    published May 25, 2004

    The moment when you take a second look at something you loved in the past is always fraught with tension. Will the object of your gaze, or your... More >>

  • As Drama or as Politics, Baitz's Future-Shock Game Is a No-Go

    published May 25, 2004

    Jon Robin Baitz's Chinese Friends is the wrong play at the right time, illustrating how even the best non-theatrical intentions can end up... More >>

  • Theater

    published May 25, 2004

    As a logical follow-up to a theatrical year full of onstage chefs and cooking, the Colleagues Theater Company, which creates work for actors in... More >>

  • Streets Where You Live

    published May 18, 2004

    It's a paradox. Friends and colleagues have been carping at me that the dialogue of Kia Corthron's new play is near incomprehensible, and that... More >>

  • Herskovits Moves Theater Forward—to Its Medieval Roots

    published May 18, 2004

    For New Year's 2004, The New York Times asked leading scholars to suggest ideas the world could do without in this millennium; "capitalism"... More >>

  • Theater

    published May 18, 2004

    OK, female readers, you tell me: If your ex of three years ago wakes you up at 3 a.m. by knocking on your bedroom window, and after climbing in... More >>

  • Season Your Admiration

    published May 11, 2004

    First, don't blame me. If New York's theater was in a miserable condition this year—and it was—I've been warning for years that it might... More >>

  • The Ape Of Things

    published May 4, 2004

    Constructors of "well-made" plays on the model perfected in the 19th century by Eugène Scribe—the model that Broadway lived by until... More >>

  • An Early Williams, Not Without Grit, Gets Turned Into Mush

    published May 4, 2004

    The 26-year-old Thomas Lanier Williams, not yet self-christened Tennessee, wrote Spring Storm for a graduate playwriting seminar at the... More >>

  • Theater

    published May 4, 2004

    It's a measure of the distance America has traveled that Bye Bye Birdie was mildly racy fun in 1960, and is merely mild fun today. Or maybe... More >>

  • Engaging The Past

    published April 27, 2004

    The past is a peculiarly American problem. We preserve it in tidied-up, explained forms, or demolish it and then landmark its site; we... More >>

  • Bollywood plus Broadway equals an Unoriginal Caste Album

    published April 27, 2004

    Everything in Bombay Dreams resembles something else. The untouchables look as clean and stylishly dressed as the rich Brahmans; their... More >>

  • Tonya Pinkins as Caroline

    published April 27, 2004

    The good news is that Caroline, or Change has survived its expansion to Broadway size with its dignity and beauty intact, and with its... More >>

  • Second Shots

    published April 20, 2004

    Thirteen years later, Assassins is still a puzzle to me, a musical without discernible purpose, like a concept album someone's decided to... More >>

  • Lorraine Hansberry's Raisin: Still Just as Fresh 45 Years Later

    published April 20, 2004

    What happens to a dream revived? Lorraine Hansberry's 1959 family drama, A Raisin in the Sun, has stood for so many years as a... More >>

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