rss Email Author Michael Feingold

Awards

  • 2010 - The Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism/Columbia University

    Theater Reviews

2005 Stories by Michael Feingold

Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998
  • Semi-Sweet

    published May 3, 2005

    How do we define a great musical? If we mean one that can bring pleasure a second or third time around, even in an inferior revival, then Sweet... More >>

  • Score Isolates Snippets of Bernstein, But Their Sum Never Equals Lenny

    published May 3, 2005

    Artistically speaking, Leonard Bernstein had so many personalities that he could only have been one person: the flamboyantly demonstrative... More >>

  • A Big Chitty Mess

    published April 26, 2005

    The second half of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang takes place in an imaginary country called Vulgaria, but no travel is involved; the... More >>

  • Unexciting Ride

    published April 26, 2005

    If you believe in the inherent value of great plays—and I do—there's something to be said for dull straightforward productions. The... More >>

  • Mamet's Shysters, Conning Again, Look a Lot Like Their Congressional Counterparts

    published April 26, 2005

    The best political play of the year is some decades old and never mentions any form of politics. Far from Washington, its settings are a drab... More >>

  • Sketchy Conception

    published April 19, 2005

    Jeffrey Hatcher's two-character, 70-minute diversion, A Picasso, is a workable specimen of the kind of thin-sliced American play that our... More >>

  • Passione All'Americana

    published April 12, 2005

    The Light in the Piazza is a musical about human beings. It has some considerable shortcomings, which I'll deal with below, but its main... More >>

  • Jones's Electricity and Uggams's Warmth Wake Up a Snoozy Script

    published April 12, 2005

    Supplanted by the TV sitcom, the ancient form of the Broadway comedy has almost entirely died out. Neil Simon, its last (and by no means best)... More >>

  • Impermanent Wave

    published April 12, 2005

    Some plays, like some novels, are written specifically for women to enjoy; when men don't enjoy them, and say so, accusations of gender snobbery... More >>

  • Story Horror

    published April 5, 2005

    Unlike his "Irish" plays previously seen over here, Martin McDonagh's The Pillowman at least has the dignity of aspiring to be about... More >>

  • Despite a Fractured Translation, This Old Love Game Can Still Kick Up Its Heels

    published April 5, 2005

    Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux (1688-1763) wrote plays that are the essence of Frenchness: totally easy to understand and utterly... More >>

  • Theater

    published April 5, 2005

    Wouldn't all theater artists love to know what we're thinking while we watch the stuff they put on? Transport Group artistic director Jack... More >>

  • Far From Tennessee

    published March 29, 2005

    The producers of The Glass Menagerie have made two large mistakes, which crash like tidal waves from opposing oceans over the frail... More >>

  • Choppers Over Philippi

    published March 29, 2005

    Most of Shakespeare's plays require an audience to make one time-jump, back to the era of his language and his social conventions. His plays set... More >>

  • A Meandering Brook Tells a Murky Parable of Intolerance

    published March 29, 2005

    The theater Peter Brook has created in recent years is a serene place, an open space spread with rugs or mats, with only a few stools or pillows... More >>

  • Theater

    published March 29, 2005

    Moved from Manhattan Theatre Club to the higher, broader, and pricier reaches of a Broadway house, John Patrick Shanley's Doubt is, if... More >>

  • A Little Quiet Dignity

    published March 22, 2005

    Drunk on the influence of the two-dimensional media, our theater has grown so overwrought and overindulgent that a little quiet dignity,... More >>

  • By way of an 'unreliable narrator,' LaBute builds an unconvincing play

    published March 22, 2005

    An elaborate contrivance carefully dressed up to look like slapdash improvisation, Neil LaBute's This Is How It Goes touches on enough... More >>

  • Theater

    published March 22, 2005

    Studio-era Hollywood was being debunked on Broadway even while it was being mythicized; the debunkings themselves, by making the place seem wacky... More >>

  • Saving Martha

    published March 15, 2005

    Daily press hype notwithstanding, no play is a great play its first time around. It may make a great impression, but you never know to what extent... More >>

  • Fresh From the Can

    published March 15, 2005

    There seems to be a curious desire, on both sides, to make a huge fuss about Spamalot, the curious part being that Spamalot... More >>

  • Trying to Confront a Brutal Past—by Looking the Other Way

    published March 15, 2005

    Sometimes you can tell from the very first moment. The opening line of Dessa Rose, sung by its heroine and taken up by the ensemble, is "We... More >>

  • Life in Venice

    published March 8, 2005

    Peggy Guggenheim must have had a good time in life; her story shows what a little money, a little intelligence, and a little get-up-and-go can... More >>

  • Spoofing the Faith: A Boyband Version of Nunsense, With Witty Dance Moves

    published March 8, 2005

    There's a Yiddish expression for things Gentiles love that Jews can't fathom: goyim naches (literally "Gentile joy"). It... More >>

  • Two-Faced Tuner

    published March 1, 2005

    In trying to recover the ground that was its own before the miseries of the British invasion set in, the Broadway musical has put itself into a... More >>

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