Best of NYC®

Best Of 2012

Neighborhoods

  • + Allerton
  • + Alphabet City
  • + Astoria
  • + Auburndale
  • + Bath Beach
  • + Battery Park City
  • + Bay Ridge
  • + Bayside
  • + Bedford Stuyvesant
  • + Belmont
  • + Bensonhurst
  • + Boerum Hill
  • + Borough Park
  • + Brighton Beach
  • + Broad Channel
  • + Bronx
  • + Brooklyn
  • + Brooklyn Heights
  • + Brownsville
  • + Bushwick
  • + Cambria Heights
  • + Canarsie
  • + Carroll Gardens
  • + Central Park
  • + Chelsea
  • + Chinatown
  • + City Island
  • + Clinton Hill
  • + Cobble Hill
  • + College Point
  • + Coney Island
  • + Corona
  • + Crotona Park
  • + Crown Heights
  • + Cypress Hills
  • + Ditmas Park
  • + Douglaston
  • + Dumbo
  • + Dyker Heights
  • + East 100s
  • + East 40s
  • + East 50s
  • + East 60s
  • + East 70s
  • + East 80s
  • + East 90s
  • + East Flatbush
  • + East Harlem
  • + East New York
  • + East Village
  • + Elmhurst
  • + Far Rockaway
  • + Financial District
  • + Flatbush
  • + Flatiron
  • + Flatlands
  • + Floral Park
  • + Flushing
  • + Fordham
  • + Forest Hills
  • + Fort Greene
  • + Garment District
  • + Gerritsen Beach
  • + Glen Oaks
  • + Glendale
  • + Gowanus
  • + Gramercy Park
  • + Gravesend
  • + Greenpoint
  • + Greenwich Village
  • + Greenwood Heights
  • + Hamilton Heights
  • + Harlem
  • + Hell's Kitchen
  • + High Bridge
  • + Highland Park
  • + Hollis
  • + Homecrest
  • + Howard Beach
  • + Hunts Point
  • + Inwood
  • + Jackson Heights
  • + Jamaica
  • + Jamaica Hills
  • + Jersey City
  • + Kensington
  • + Kew Gardens Hills
  • + Kingsbridge
  • + Koreatown
  • + Little Italy
  • + Little Neck
  • + Long Island
  • + Long Island City
  • + Louisiana
  • + Lower East Side
  • + Marine Park
  • + Maspeth
  • + Meatpacking District
  • + Middle Village
  • + Midwood
  • + Morningside Heights
  • + Morris Park
  • + Morrisania
  • + Mott Haven
  • + Murray Hill
  • + New Jersey
  • + New Lots
  • + New Utrecht
  • + Noho
  • + Nolita
  • + Ocean Hill
  • + Out of Town
  • + Ozone Park
  • + Park Slope
  • + Parkchester
  • + Pelham Bay
  • + Pennsylvania
  • + Prospect Heights
  • + Prospect Park South
  • + Prospect-Lefferts Garden
  • + Red Hook
  • + Rego Park
  • + Richmond Hill
  • + Ridgewood
  • + Riverdale
  • + Rockaway Beach
  • + Roosevelt Island
  • + Rosedale
  • + Sheepshead Bay
  • + Soho
  • + South Park Slope
  • + South Riverdale
  • + South Street Seaport
  • + St Albans
  • + Staten Island
  • + Sunnyside
  • + Sunset Park
  • + Throgs Neck
  • + Tribeca
  • + Union Square
  • + Unknown
  • + Utah
  • + Washington Heights
  • + West 100s
  • + West 40s
  • + West 50s
  • + West 60s
  • + West 70s
  • + West 80s
  • + West 90s
  • + West Village
  • + Whitestone
  • + Williamsburg
  • + Windsor Terrace
  • + Woodlawn
  • + Woodside
Map It

Arts & Entertainment

Food & Drink

Shopping & Services

Sports & Recreation

MORE

Best Of :: Sports & Recreation

Best Met
R.A. Dickey

We wouldn't argue too much with anyone who picks David Wright, but for sheer value, sheer entertainment, and sheer inspiration—the entire package—the best and most valuable Met of the 2012 season is R.A. Dickey. If his second half wasn't quite as dynamic as his first (12-1), did you really expect him to have a .923 win-loss percentage for the entire season? Lots of pitchers have thrown unhittable knuckleballs, but Dickey is the first pitcher in major-league history—the first—to control this baffling force of nature. Not only that, he can throw it at three different speeds. And not only that, he reads. His favorites, he told us, are Faulkner and Hemingway. Makes sense. After surviving a childhood of sexual abuse and homelessness, he has not only endured but also prevailed, displaying admirable grace under pressure.

123-01 Roosevelt Ave., New York, 11368
MAP
718-507-6387
Best Coach
Tom Coughlin

It's hard to overlook Mike Woodson's work in bringing the Knicks together late in the season, or Joe Girardi's in repairing the Yankees pitching staff after losing several key pitchers. But they didn't win championships last season. Incredibly—and we say "incredibly" because we've ripped him as much as anyone else—Tom Coughlin did. We still don't know how. The Giants were just 9-7 during the regular season and were outscored by their opponents, becoming the first team ever to win the Super Bowl after giving up more points than they scored—but they stormed through the postseason, beating two teams—the Packers and the 49ers—who seemed to be much better than they were. And the Giants did it on their home fields. And despite the gripes of several players who felt they weren't being used properly, Coughlin never gave in to pressure and held them together when it counted the most: "You get the credit for the wins," Casey Stengel once said, "so you gotta take the blame for the losses." Coughlin gets credit for the wins.

102 MetLife Stadium Rd., East Rutherford, 07073
MAP
201-559-1500
Best Giant
Victor Cruz

Of course, Eli Manning was the major force behind the Giants coming down the stretch and into the playoffs. And, of course, the quarterback deserves the major share of the credit. But Manning wasn't as good a quarterback as Victor Cruz was a receiver. Cruz wasn't just the possession guy, the one you went to on third-and-five. He was the big-play guy, the one you went to when it was third-and-10 or longer. He had 82 receptions, 11 for TDs, for 1,536 yards—that's 18.7 yards per catch, the kind of stat that forces defensive coordinators to double-cover a receiver. He was the Giants' best breakaway receiver since . . . who? We can't recall anyone in the Bill Parcells years who was such a threat going over the middle. If he does this for another season, we're going to have to wake up the echoes and compare him to Del Shofner and Frank Gifford.

102 MetLife Stadium Rd., East Rutherford, 07073
MAP
201-559-1500
Best Jet
Darrelle Revis

Two seasons ago, the Jets' defense was just about the best in the NFL. Since then, it has steadily unraveled, with only one player who could be counted among the league's best defensive backs. Darrelle Revis was a first-team All-Pro selection last year, the third time he has been chosen and the fourth time he had made All-Pro at first or second level. He is, by consensus, the best one-on-one cover man in the league, and the only reason he didn't intercept more than four passes last year is opposing quarterbacks' reluctance to throw the ball in his general vicinity. Revis is not just a great athlete, he's also a great football player, as good a tackler as he is a cover man. The question really shouldn't be "Is Darrelle Revis the best player on the Jets?" The question should be "Is Darrelle Revis the greatest player in Jets history?" Let's pray he's as great next year, after this year's season-ending knee injury.

102 MetLife Stadium Rd., East Rutherford, 07073
MAP
201-559-1500
Best Knick
Carmelo Anthony

There really isn't much of a debate here. Carmelo Anthony was sixth in the league in points per game last year (22.6) and was even better in the postseason (27.8). He's a pretty good all-around player and became a much better one under Mike Woodson. It should be interesting to see how much better he gets this year with the opportunity to play a full season with Woodson. Anthony is proving he can sacrifice for the team—or he can give up burgers and fries (at least the supersize)—and lost 12 pounds by the end of June at Woodson's request. (Fifteen to 20 more would be even nicer.) We're happy to see that he has not metamorphosed into a wax figure at Madame Tussauds. Melo says he's motivated by watching LeBron and the Heat take the title and that "I truly believe my time is coming." As his time goes, so goes the Knicks' time.

Seventh Ave. & 32nd St., New York, 10001
MAP
212-465-6741
Best Rookie
Matt Harvey

In terms of impact, Matt Harvey didn't do much for the Mets this season. The Mets strictly limited his starts and innings pitched. Still, Harvey brought with him something better than a couple more in the wins column—he brought hope for 2013. "I don't want to jinx him," says Ron Darling, "but he's got mechanics as good as Tom Seaver." That's not hype: Everything about Harvey points in a Seaver-like direction, from his ERA (around or under 3.00 for most of his stint with the Mets) to his better than one strikeout per inning pitched. He has got speed, variety, and control. And he can even hit a lick; against Cincinnati earlier this season, he got two hits in a game. (At the U of North Carolina, he even played a little first base.) He admits to having grown up (in Connecticut) a Yankees fan but quickly earned forgiveness for that one character flaw.

123-01 Roosevelt Ave., New York, 11368
MAP
718-507-6387
X

Best Met: R.A. Dickey

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send:

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >