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Anthology Film Archives

32 Second Ave. New York, NY 10003 | East Village | 212-505-5181

Location Description:

This historic avant-garde venue screens over 900 films a year, preserves 25, publishes books and DVDs and hosts talks from scholars. It is located at Second Avenue and 2nd Street, in a former courthouse. Close to major transportation. Wheelchair accessible with assistance and advanced notice.


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  • Film: Reviews
    Joe Sarno may be, in the words of performance artist Annie Sprinkle, "the Ingmar Bergman of porn," but A Life in Dirty Movies doesn't dwell on his accomplishments as a pioneering...
  • Film:
    It doesn't matter that Iggy Pop endorses Carnival Cruises, or that Ramones-style crunch chords now power Top 40 country hits. Today punk is whatever you need it to be when you're at the age...
  • Film: Reviews
    While Klaus Kinski is not the star of Zapata-themed spaghetti western A Bullet for the General, screening as part of Anthology Film Archives' Kinski retrospective, his performance as...
  • Film: Reviews
    Committed to a preservation-minded, grassroots-activism agenda, the second annual MoRUS Film Festival (August 1 through 9, at various East Village venues, presented by the Museum of the...
  • Film: Reviews
    Gabe Klinger's Double Play is a tidy documentary about two creative brains: directors James Benning and Richard Linklater. Benning, the elder of the two, shoots austerely beautiful...
  • Film: Reviews
    If you're looking for highly polished filmmaking, you won't find it in Breakthrough Weekend, a micro-indie from Brooklyn–based filmmaker Sujewa Ekanayake: The camera work is...
  • Film: Reviews
    Where We Started, the third feature film from writer-director Chris Hansen, is a modest, unassuming two-character portrait about a couple of married strangers — mechanic and struggling...
  • Film: Reviews
    "Only simpletons believe the market is capable of learning," says Rainer Voss, long a top investment banker in Germany and now patiently, powerfully dishing for Marc Bauder's camera. That...
  • Film:
    Gebo and the Shadow is a film about concrete, hard, and material things, as well as one about illusions. Its dramatic elements are simple. The 105-year-old filmmaker Manoel de Oliveira's...
  • Film:
    If the mid-career of Jerry Lewis — the post–Dean Martin era, the years of films like The Nutty Professor, The Disorderly Orderly, and The Errand Boy — is often treated as...
  • Film:
    In 1897, three years after its founding, the Edison Studios immortalized a Lower East Side vaudeville routine called the "Bowery Waltz": A stiff-legged man seizes a booze-woozy woman, and,...
  • Film:
    When an aspirant student of literature sets about learning the canon, the masterworks will be waiting. Indeed, they're always there, resting on library shelves across America. Young film...
  • Film: Reviews
    Weaving numerous influences into a rich emotional tapestry, Alain Guiraudie's The King of Escape skillfully absorbs and updates its assertive cinematic forebears. Part Pierrot Le Fou, part...
  • Film: Reviews
    A stilted period piece about a hood torn between his life of crime and the kind beauty with whom he falls in love, A New York Heartbeat is equal parts affected hardboiled posturing and...
  • Film:
    If you've ever wished more pornographers idolized Mickey Spillane, then get to Anthology Film Archives for Porn Noir, the latest in their In the Flesh adult film surveys. Smutty,...
  • Film: Reviews
    American filmmaker and poet James Broughton recorded odes to life on Earth. On March 22 and 23, Anthology Film Archive presents programs of Broughton's film work that include reverent and...
  • Film: Reviews
    For decades, floods arrived in Westport, Mississippi, with such regularity that destruction seemed routine. People had grown accustomed to loss — to seeing homes perennially...
  • Voice Choices:
    And for the truly cynical, Anthology Film Archives presents Valentine’s Day Massacre 2014, featuring three movies depicting the ugly side of love: Maurice Pialat’s We Won’t...
  • Film:
    The tendency of violence to beget more violence has been the concern of artists since long before Aeschylus wrote about Orestes, who killed his mother for killing his father for killing his...
  • Film:
    Early in the documentary Breaking the Frame, Carolee Schneemann (b. 1939) displays for the camera a headless chipmunk; we can infer the culprit through an abrupt edit from the bloody...
  • Film:
    Ulrich Seidl's Paradise trilogy has already this year horsewhipped us with Love and thumbscrewed us with Faith, so now it's time to be kneecapped by Hope. Co-written with Seidl's wife,...
  • Film: Reviews
    Like Mila Turajlic's 2011 documentary Cinema Komunisto, Davy Chou's Golden Slumbers is a wrenching requiem for a war-torn country's once-thriving film industry. Komunisto celebrates the...
  • Film:
    There is a secret heaven genre geeks know about, an antique theme park of candlelit castle corridors, webby crypt cellars, velvet-curtained dining halls, old-growth estate hills dripping...
  • Film: Reviews
    Five films, four flavors of the ol' pillaging-in-leathers routine. Twilight-of-the-studio-era extravaganzas Richard Fleischer's The Vikings (1958) and Jack Cardiff's The Long Ships (1964)...
  • Voice Choices:
    Could Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man be one of the great buddy movies? For a couple of snarling monsters, these guys work well together. Three years after the original film The Wolf...
  • Film: Reviews
    In 1926, Mexican president Plutarco Elías Calles outlawed the Catholic Church for violating the country's post-revolution constitution, prompting a civil war whose rebels called...
  • Film: Reviews
    Pioneering American sexploitation filmmaker Russ Meyer was at his best when he was most casually crass. Vixen!, the last movie Meyer made before Beyond the Valley of the Dolls and his vain...
  • Film:
    What will people think when they see you reading the New York Review Books reprint of Georges Simenon's novel The Engagement on the subway? That cover photo, a voyeuristic glimpse of a...
  • Film: Reviews
    The northern Portugal town of Guimarães might not seem as fitting a subject for a portmanteau film tribute as its more metropolitan brethren (Paris, je t'aime; New York, I Love You;...
  • Film:
    It's rare to see tenderness between men in films. Social codes demand males keep a distance from each other, and dramatic codes drive them further apart onscreen by mandating that they meet...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dr. Gregory Fleer has created the mother of all drugs. The substance called I Razor messes with your mind in unimaginable ways. But the only way you can get your hands on it is at the debut...
  • Film: Reviews
    An early moment in Student shows a young man at a window, staring. He has just borne witness to two acts of violence. First, a peer has spilled hot tea on a rich woman's lap; second, the...
  • Film: Reviews
    The girls first appear clumped together within a dark room. Yingying is 10 years old, Zhenzhen six, Fenfen four. Light comes from a nearby fire, and a competition soon emerges over which...
  • Film: Reviews
    At nearly four hours, this crash course in the life and work of experimental-cinema pioneer Peter Kubelka is roughly four times longer than Kubelka's lifelong output. That is, if you...
  • Film:
    Jonas Mekas has played many roles in his life—poet, student, political prisoner, Lithuanian exile, film critic (the Voice's first), publisher, canon-builder, polemicist, Romantic,...
  • Film: Reviews
    Forever on fire with fear of God, unburdened by literacy or expectations of a life that might extend past the thirties, ruled by day and night and the world's great silence, the medieval...
  • Voice Choices:
    Hey girl. It's not just about pictures of Ryan Gosling with pithy captions superimposed. Feminist porn is much, much more. Sex-positive pornographer Tristan Taormino will strip the genre...
  • Film:
    What was Amos Vogel rebelling against? Like Brando in The Wild One, the answer might have been "Whaddya got?" "Maybe it's obnoxious to some," Vogel, the programmer, critic,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Delayed due to Hurricane Sandy, comedian Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett’s Found Footage Festival is finally back with a new lineup of bizarre VHS tapes rescued from thrift stores and...
  • Voice Choices:
    One would be hard-pressed to think of anyone who has done more to champion underground film than the self-proclaimed “raving maniac of cinema” Jonas Mekas. His long list of...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Jean Epstein (1932-1933). Preceded by short. Sea and wind soak through Epstein's sailor-and-shipwrecks myth with such force that watching the film can feel like wearing a rain-damped...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Jessica Hausner (2009) In Hausner’s film, wheelchair-bound Christine (played by the always-astonishing Sylvie Testud) hopes for a miraculous cure of her multiple sclerosis; in the...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Robert Flaherty (1922) Flaherty’s classic study of an Inuit and his family in the Canadian Arctic is regarded as the first feature-length documentary. Criticism of the...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Vítor Gonçalves (1986) A milestone of 1980s Portuguese cinema, Gonçalves’s first feature concerns a teenager (played by Isabel Galhardo) struggling with...
  • Voice Choices:
    New Yorkers have an affinity for bicycles (they’re as common as taxicabs), whether riding for pleasure or transport, so it’s only natural that there’s a film festival that...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. John Avildsen (1970) An Upper West Side advertising executive and a tool-and-die maker from Queens (Peter Boyle, in a sensational performance) unite over their hatred of long hairs,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. John Badham (1977) In her excellent 2010 book on disco, Hot Stuff, Alice Echols argues that John Travolta “expands[s], not constrict[s], the parameters of masculinity” in...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Allan Moyle (1980) In Moyle’s sociohistorical record of squalid, teeming Koch-era 42nd Street, Dalton student Trini Alvarado and butch outer-borough throwaway Robin Johnson become...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Bob Rafelson (1970) Chopin-playing, privileged son Jack Nicholson, after slumming with diner waitress Karen Black and oil-rig buddies in California, heads back to his Puget Sound home...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. George Romero (1976) Romero’s 1976 horror film—set, like many of his movies, around Pittsburgh— concerns the young man of the title, who’s convinced he’s a...
  • Voice Choices:
    Not long ago, filmmaker Sara Driver’s 1980 cult hit You Are Not I, based on the Paul Bowles short story and co-written and shot by her longtime partner Jim Jarmusch, was believed to be...
  • Voice Choices:
    Though there are always exceptions, the job of the screenwriter is mostly a thankless one of long solitary hours and little professional glory. But no longer! In an effort to bring these...
  • Voice Choices:
    “I had this attitude then that I didn’t know how to make a film, but I wasn’t going to let that stop me,” filmmaker Amos Poe told Films in Review last year. His DIY...
  • Voice Choices:
    Things aren’t so good at the opening day of fast-food restaurant American Chicken Bunker. Built on the Tromahawk Tribe sacred burial grounds, the restaurant is under attack by a group...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. F.W. Murnau (1927). Silent cinema reaches its acme with movement of Murnau’s camera through the vaporous fields of an invented America. Superimpositions and dissolves achieve an...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Peter Whitehead (1969). A British documentarian comes to New York and finds himself joining the Columbia students barricaded in Low Library. Peter Whitehead’s most ambitious film...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Yasujiro Ozu (1932). Class relations enter the family: Ozu called this silent comedy—one of the best movies about children ever made—a “Picture Book for...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Travis Wilkerson (2002). Recalling the great strikes of the World War I period and explicates the death of an IWW organizer in Butte, Montana Travis Wilkerson’s documentary-essay...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Pacho Velez (2010). More reportage than documentary, this highly personal account of three young Croatian activists searching for a viable, post-socialist leftism is an affecting,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Peter Watkins (2001). Dynamic historical reconstruction in the form of an experimental documentary, Watkins’ six-hour masterpiece is contagiously exciting. Meant to evoke the...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Michael Madsen (2010). Documenting the tombs the Finnish government has dug for their nuclear waste, Into Eternity is not so much warning (although it is that) as head trip....
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Nikolaus Geyrhalter (1999). This beautifully shot and eerily restrained documentary takes its title from the long-evacuated town closest to Chernobyl, exploring the contaminated zone,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Ken Jacobs (1969). In this classic of late ‘60s New York structural filmmaking, Jacobs reworks a static, pre-Griffith one-reeler so as to create an action-packed example of how...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Rolando Klein (1974). An exceptionally beautiful neo-realist drama, shot by Chilean director Rolando Klein in the Mayan language, among the indigenous people of Chiapas,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Jonas Mekas (2011). Drawing on his personal archives, Mekas has assembled a Fluxus vaudeville starring Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys, and the late Nam June Paik. Most of the material is...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Jeff Margolis (1979). The greatest com-doc ever captures America’s greatest stand-up performer at the height of his taboo-breaking powers. Pryor is on fire, among other things...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Jonas Mekas (1962). Fascinating but inert, Mekas’s first feature can be seen as an attempt to synthesize the beat classics Pull My Daisy and Shadows under the sign...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Philip Kaufman & Benjamin Manaster (1964). Acrid and whimsical, this self-consciously American new wave film is distinguished by its Chicago locations, droll performances (including Ben...
  • Voice Choices:
    A product of the global student-protest movement in the late 1960s, Berlin-based artist Harun Farocki has long been interested in creating works that question the established rules. To...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Slava Tsukerman (1982). Tsukerman brought a sardonic distance and a wealth of Soviet film school craft to this Lower Manhattan punk sci-fi extravaganza—one of the most successful...
  • Voice Choices:
    On the heels of the New York International Latino Film Festival comes another film series celebrating the talents of young Mexicans who are truly revolutionizing cinema. GenMex: Recent Films...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Alexander Dovzhenko (1929). Dovzhenko's last silent film takes on the Russian civil war; the movie’s powerful use of repetition, cartoonish images, mad angles, fondness for...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Alexander Dovzhenko (1930). Drafted to make a movie on rural collectivization, Dovzhenko produced a myth—the creation of the kolkhoz as part of a cosmic cycle of birth and death....
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Alexander Dovzhenko (1928). The great Ukrainian director Alexander Dovzhenko’s breakthrough came with this comic political folk tale—a Gogolian allegory of Ukrainian history,...
  • Voice Choices:
    The Anthology Film Archives need no better advertisement for their new film program The Return of Nick Zedd than these words from John "The Sultan of Sleaze" Waters, "Nick Zedd makes...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Jean Cocteau (1950). Cocteau’s brilliant, hokey transposition of the Greek myth to postwar (or is it occupied?) France is not only his most successful essay in pop surrealism but,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Carl Theodore Dreyer (1932). Uncanny in its discontinuities, a movie dedicated to working against all generic expectation, Carl Theodore Dreyer’s vision of the undead (as well as...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Carl Theodore Dreyer (1928). One of the culminating masterpieces of European silent cinema, shot almost entirely in close-up, Dreyer’s Joan is ecstatically...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Carl Theodor Dreyer (1955). Dreyer’s toughest nut—a hardscrabble religious parable that demands you take faith literally. Even if you’ve seen the Carlos Reygadas remake,...

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