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Film Society of Lincoln Center - Walter Reade Theater

165 W. 65th St. New York, NY 10023 | West 60s | 212-875-5600

Location Description:

Walter Reade offers eclectic programming ranging from auteurist retros to outré historical series to rare screenings of distributor-less indie and foreign films. The sound is excellent, the screen is one of the largest in New York, and the snack bar sells brownies. You can buy a Film Society of Lincoln Center membership at the box office, which gets you discount admission and early dibs on New York Film Festival tickets.


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