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11 W. 53rd St. New York, NY 10020 | West 40s | 212-708-9480
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  • Fork in the Road: Events
    Unless you're just waking up from a long coma, you likely already know that Super Bowl madness hits NYC this week. There are, however, a number of non-athletic food-related activities in...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Robert Aldrich (1956). Charles Silver's Auterist History of Film series is just the thing for anyone needing to convince lovers or relatives that, yes, it is worthwhile paying attention...
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    Dir. King Vidor (1940). One argument in favor of location shooting is that the Louis B. Mayers of the world might be too far away to suss out what exactly a director is up to. Perhaps...
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    Dir. D. W. Griffith (1914). Dir. Jack (John) Ford (1917). A rancher on a ridge surveying his dogies – and his scions – below. The first shot in the first feature from John...
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    Dir. Charles Laughton (1955) One of the best movies about the resilience of children, Laughton’s sole directorial debut effort from 1955 features Robert Mitchum as a sociopath pursuing...
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    Dir. Arne Sucksdorff (1953) Sucksdorff once said that the theme of his beloved film was “man’s relation to the lost paradise.” The flora and fauna that surround a Swedish...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Yasujiro Ozu (1953) The final, devastating lines in Ozu’s masterpiece of intergenerational unhappiness—focusing on disappointed elderly parents and their overburdened adult...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Alfred Hitchcock (1952) While making this suspenser, Hitchcock was reportedly driven nuts by the Method acting of star Montgomery Clift, playing a Quebec City priest wrongly accused of...
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    Dir. Kenji Mizoguchi (1952) Mizoguchi’s sublime critique of Japanese patriarchy examines a 17th-century courtesan (Kinuyo Tinaka) as she looks back on her life—a series of...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Vincente Minnelli (1953) One of the giddiest backstage musicals ever made, Minnelli’s 1953 movie features Fred Astaire’s washed-up song-and-dance man hoping for a comeback...
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    Dir. Joseph Losey (1950) Shortly before his exile to Europe after being blacklisted, Losey made this left-leaning potboiler, about a newspaper editor in small-town California who stands up...
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    Dir. Charles Chaplin (1952) Set in 1914, the last film Charlie Chaplin made in America (from 1952) is his tribute to his music-hall career in London—and to his comic rival, Buster...
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    Dir. Max Ophüls (1952) Adapting three stories by Guy de Maupassant, Ophüls treats the author’s theme of human vanity with greater empathy than the original. Stanley Kubrick...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Lourdes Portillo (1999) Screening as part of MOMA’s essential Portillo retrospective, these two short works are, respectively, a tribute to the Mexican superstar gunned down in...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Kenji Mizoguchi (1953) Hailed as one of the definitive works of Japan’s Golden Age of Film, Mizoguchi’s 1953 masterpiece takes place during the civil wars of the 16th...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Max Ophuls (1953) The ultimate coquette, Danielle Darrieux, playing the surname-less comtesse of the title, sets the plot of Max Ophuls’s supreme 1953 tragedy in motion by...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Werner Schroeter (1986) Schroeter’s tribute to his muse, the great Magdalena Montezuma, who was dying of cancer during filming in Portugal, is a florid riot of red, all-consuming...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Fritz Lang (1953) The best of Lang’s noirs is relentlessly brutal: Who can ever forget mob thug Lee Marvin throwing a pot of scalding-hot coffee at moll Gloria Grahame’s...
  • Voice Choices:
    For many of us who didn’t get a chance to experience the true spirit of the free-love movement, the hippie era, and the experimental sounds of the ’60s—Woodstock, the...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Raj Kapoor (1951). Kapoor became India’s greatest star (as well as a Soviet icon) directing himself as Chaplinesque protagonist in this musical epic, filled with show biz...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Max Ophuls (1950). Few movies are more “Viennese” than Ophuls’s ultra-civilized sex comedy. Following a particular erotic daisy chain across the social classes, Ophuls...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Mario Monicelli (1960). Also known as The Passionate Thief, this one-night mel0drama stars volcanic diva Anna Magnani, the young Ben Gazzara, and the great Totò as a penniless...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. John Ford (1950). Ford took a break from cavalry westerns to direct this lively wild west show pageant in which good-natured roughnecks Ben Johnson and Harry Carey Jr. guide...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. J.C. Chandor (2011). Relive the financial collapse of ’08 from the perspective of a Lehman Brothers-type investment bank. The action confined largely to the upper floors of a Wall...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Gerardo Naranjo (2011). An aspiring beauty queen becomes an unwitting pawn in the international drug trade, as well as a metaphor for her nation. Gerardo Naranjo’s third feature...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Lars von Trier (2011). Melancholia's first five minutes are like a formal invitation to the end of the world; the next two hours allow you to live through the run-up. We are all...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Federico Fellini (1960). The sensation of 1960 and most notorious of Fellini films—evocation of jet-set decadence, source of the term “paparazzi”—has a period...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Serge Bromberg and Ruxandra Medrea, 2009). The title has a double meaning: H.G. Clouzot attempted to make the ultimate ’60s flick, Inferno, and came unhinged in the process....
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot (1943). In his brilliantly nasty second feature, Clouzot takes a clinical pleasure in detailing a small town’s moral disintegration and morbid sexuality as...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot (1947). Backstage policier? Musical noir? Virtually unknown here, this 1947 hardboiled entertainment by French genre-meister H.G. Clouzot suggests a Langian...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Henri-George Clouzot (1955). Hitchcock’s Psycho, not to mention a ridiculous remake starring Sharon Stone, may have erased it from public memory but Clouzot’s once...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Manoel de Oliviera (2010). As funny and peculiar as its title promises, de Oliviera’s latest last film puts his own eccentric spin on the myth of Orpheus—offering a modest,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Yasujiro Ozu (1949). Ozu acknowledged the post World War II order in this uncannily tranquil heartbreaker about a father who tricks his supremely dutiful daughter into leaving him. ...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot (1954). The ultimate in existential drama, Clouzot’s nail-biter, hokey but effective, sends a pair of scurvy expatriates driving through the back roads of...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Jean Cocteau (1949). Cocteau’s brilliant, hokey transposition of the Greek myth to postwar (or is it German-occupied?) France is not only his most successful essay in pop...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Tian Zhuangzhuang (2002). Zhuangzhuang’s most intimate movie is a poignant, exquisitely-crafted chamber drama of indefinable moods and subtle emotional coloration—and,...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Vittorio DeSica (1948). The most universally praised movie produced anywhere on planet earth during the first decade after World War II, Vittorio De Sica’s 1948 neo-realist...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Elaine May (1976). The greatest film John Cassavetes never made features the man himself, along with sidekick Peter Falk, as a two-bit racketeer taking a journey through downtown...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Wong Kar-wai (1997). As romantic as it is fragmented, Kar-wai’s exotic adventure is both bravura love story and an attitudinous buddy film. Anxious Tony Leung and spontaneous...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Richard Fleischer (1956). Claude Chabrol remade ornate melodrama, based on a once notorious crime of passion, as A Girl Cut in Two, and you can see what he saw in...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Walter Hill (1979). The DNA for the current hit Drive can be found in this stripped-down crime thriller starring Ryan O’Neal as an existential wheelman; Walter...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Frank Borzage (1933). Tough young Spencer Tracy shacks up with Loretta Young's teenage drifter in a Manhattan shantytown—'30s rom-com doesn’t come any more...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Max Ophuls (1948). Adapting a story by Stefan Zweig, Ophuls created a heartbreaking tale of unrequited love in which the narrative is as deftly circular as his constant camera...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Charles Chaplin (1947). For his first movie since The Great Dictator (1940), Chaplin abandoned the Little Tramp to play a comic version of the French serial killer Henri Landru who...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Leonard Kastle (1970). Cheap-looking, lowdown, and mysterious in its origins (Martin Scorsese was the initial director), this fact-based black comedy about the murderous career of a...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Frank Lloyd (1933). Directed from a script co-written by pulp poet Joseph Moncure March, this carnie film is loaded with hokum and casual outrage (the fat lady hoisted onto the circus...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Roger Corman (1962). Possibly the most alarming B movie of 1962, Corman’s anti-segregationist screen-scorcher, shot on location in an Ozark town, is both ferociously topical and...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Roman Polanski (2010). Polanski hasn’t made a movie so sustained in the decades since The Tenant or even 1966’s Cul de Sac. In a way, this seemingly modest political...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Roman Polanski (1992). Best enjoyed as the infernal sequel to Four Weddings and a Funeral, Polanski’s dark, self-reflexive sex comedy reunites Hugh Grant and Kristin...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Andrzej Wajda (1954). The great Polish director’s first feature—about a group of slum kids who join the Communist resistance during World War II—is tendentious but...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Roman Polanski (1976). Polanski’s English-language, Paris-set creepfest may be the director’s quintessential movie—an exercise in urban paranoia and mental disintegration...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Roman Polanski (1962). Polanski went straight to the head of his class with his first (and until The Pianist, his only) Polish feature. This cold-eyed account of sexual...
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    Dir. Roman Polanski (2002). Polanski’s world is predicated on violent absurdity and, closely adapted from Wladyslaw Szpilman’s Holocaust memoirs, his Cannes prizewinner exhibits an...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Spike Lee (1989). Lee’s strongest, richest, most provocative movie feels more significant with each passing year. As the key New York movie of the past decade, it’s an...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. R.W. Fassbinder (1978). A rawboned, working-class transsexual kills herself for love. This astounding film was Fassbinder’s response to the suicide of one of his own lovers. ...
  • Voice Choices:
    Dir. Marcel Carne (1944). The French equivalent to Gone With the Wind, Marcel Carne’s grand elaboration on the life-as-theater-as-life metaphor derives additional emotional heft...

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The Museum of Modern Art is a place that fuels creativity, ignites minds, and provides inspiration. With extraordinary exhibitions and the world's finest collection of modern and contemporary art, MoMA is dedicated to the conversation between the past and the present, the established and the experimental. Our mission is helping you understand and enjoy the art of our time.

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