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Museum of the Moving Image

36-01 35th Ave. New York, NY 11106 | Astoria | 718-777-6888

Location Description:

The Museum of the Moving Image hosts daily screenings of contemporary, classic, and experimental movies. It's home to a handful of exhibitions that stretch beyond conventional feature films, as well as various education programs and video art collections. Renovated and expanded in 2011, the open space in Astoria now features a clean, all-white design, and its futuristic 267-seat main theater is the Museum's centerpiece. Regular screenings are included in the price of admission. For information on specific screenings as well as special ticketed events, check the website's official calendar. Admission is free from 4 to 8 p.m. on Fridays, and active duty service members and New York City teachers with ID have free admission at all times.


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