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Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

Last week, President Obama announced he would attack Syria after evidence that the country had used chemical weapons on it's own people surfaced--should he receive the authorization of Congress. Needless to say, it has sent many political scholars into a frenzy. Miley Cyrus is among them. On September 9th of 2013, she released the video for her newest single "Wrecking Ball," directed by a man who once took advantage of one of our writers, in which she uses stunning minimalist imagery to loudly voice her controversial support for American intervention in Syria.

See also: Dissecting the Politically Charged Subtext of Miley Cyrus's "We Can't Stop" Video

Miley Directly Addresses the Camera with Tears in Her Eyes
Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

White wall. White nails. White teeth. White skin. Miley positions herself in the eye of an iceberg throughout "Wrecking Ball." She doesn't want anyone to be distracted from the central question of the video--why can't I stop crying? Miley is crying because of all the injustice in the world. She surrounds herself in a bleak white shroud so her audience understands the human heart of the Syrian story, and the necessity of intervening in a country with a population that's slowly disappearing.

Miley Swings on a Wrecking Ball With Clothes On

Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

Never forget that Miley is a simple country girl at heart. As such, it makes sense for her to don her white freedom fighter uniform on a precariously giant weapon of mass destruction. Not only does she want the United States to intervene, she wants to get personally involved. She is willing to put her million-dollar-twerk-butt on the line in order to help.

See also: The World's Greatest Works of Writing...If They Were About Twerking

Miley Swings on a Wrecking Ball With Clothes Off
Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

Simple country girl aside, Miley understands that eroticism is the only true way to the heart of any true American politician. And given the low IQ's of most of the people we've elected to Congress, the easiest way to communicate this is through direct nudity. Even though Miley realizes the risk that comes along with shamelessly welding Western provocation to the real and metaphorical machinery of war in the Middle East, she is willing to make the moral sacrifice if it means Congress will do what she says and intervene. She is not a symbol of debauchery, over-exposure, or illness. She is a feminist freedom fighter.

See also: Miley Poppin' Molly: How Miley Cyrus Officially Made Singing About Drugs Uncool

 

Miley Performs Oral Sex on a Sledge-Hammer

Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

Like feminist film scholar Laura Mulvey before her, Miley is actually married to the deconstruction of the image. She understands that in order for her music video to form tangible public opinion in support of intervention, she must go all the way in displaying her dedication. Not only is Miley willing to ride a wrecking ball into the walls of oppression, she'll have sex with pretty much any political and physical tool that makes it possible, too.

Miley Horizontally Frolics in the Rubble

Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

Miley understands the cost of war. As such, she is more than ready to lie down in the rubble that a Syrian intervention would create. She doesn't care if she has streaks of shit on her underwear. She doesn't even care if her white feminist freedom fighter uniform is tactically-unfit for a war-zone (minus the light-bistre combat boots, of course).

But she's not just a vicious warrior. Just listen to her as she croons in her final on-screen moments "I never wanted to start a war, I just wanted you to let me in." She wants America to be let into Syria in order to save the world. A true wrecking-ball.

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