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Animal Rights Activists Exploit "Illegals" in Central Park Horse-Carriage War

Animal Rights Activists Exploit "Illegals" in Central Park Horse-Carriage War
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As we've chronicled, there is a war going on between the labor union that represents Central Park horse-carriage drivers and animal rights activists who think keeping horses in midtown Manhattan is dangerous and inhumane.

Now the activists are using illegal immigrants as PR ammo against the union.

The Coalition to Ban Horse-Drawn Carriages sent us an e-mail this morning with the subject line "Illegals in Horse Carriage Trade." In the e-mail, the group outlines how the union employs illegal immigrants, one of whom "foolishly lied about an animal activist, Roxanne Delgado, attacking him at the hack line."

The group says another "illegal" was picked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers about six weeks prior. 

"Allegedly spurred on by Stephen Malone, President of the Horse & Carriage Association of NYC, and Demos Demopoulous, Teamster Union representative Rojas stuck his neck out, probably never thinking he was going to get outed," the group says. "Perhaps he thought that nothing would happen because the administration appears to have the back of the carriage trade, ignoring their many violations."

The group goes on to say that "illegals" "operate in a world of entitlement because the Administration and all agencies that oversee them look the other way."

"What good is a law against illegal immigration -- especially those who have criminal records -- if one of the city agencies ignores it? What good are rules and regulations over the carriage trade if they are rarely enforced," the group asks.

It might come as a shock to the animal rights activists, but "illegals" are human beings -- and they're not all criminals. The vast majority of them come to the U.S. to try and better themselves by working crappy jobs for low pay -- like shoveling shit at a horse stable.

Illegal immigration is a serious problem in this country, and it's one that animal rights activists apparently want to solve -- right after they tackle America's ongoing horse-carriage problem, that is.


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