Former Texas Cop Indicted in New York for Moving 200 Tons of Cocaine

A leader of a major Mexican drug cartel and former Texas police officer was sentenced in Manhattan federal court yesterday for importing at least 200 tons of cocaine into the United States during a five year period.

Between 1994 and 1999, Gilberto Salinas Doria -- formerly Officer Dora of the Donna, Texas Police Department -- arranged the delivery of at least 200 tons of cocaine to wholesale distributors in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania...

Doria was arrested by Mexican authorities in 1998, and the U.S. began making requests for his extradition the following year. He wasn't extradited until 2007. Prior to extradition he escaped from captivity in Mexico, but was apprehended in Venezuela, and returned to Mexico to face local charges.

In yesterday's announcement, Doria was referred to as a leader of the Juarez Cartel, which was founded by the late Carrillo Fuentes, the so-called "Lord of the Skies.' Fuentes died in a botched plastic surgery operation that he was undergoing to disguise his identity from authorities.

The cartel smuggled cocaine from Colombia through cities on Mexico's eastern coast, specifically the state of Quintano Roo and the tourist city of Playa Del Carmen. In 1999, the FBI reported that the governor of Quintano Roo, Mario Ernesto Villanueva Madrid, was also being paid off by the cartel. He too was named as co-defendent, but has not been extradited to the U.S..

From Mexico, the drugs went to McAllen, Texas, and to other cities such as San Diego, Chicago, Atlanta, and New York. From there it was moved to Nashville, Miami, Detroit, Raleigh, Houston, Newark, Philadelphia, San Antonio, Tulsa and Los Angeles.

Doria pleaded guilty in December 2008 to narcotics conspiracy charges and was sentenced to 27 years in prison.


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