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Lara Logan: Was She Actually Raped? It Makes a Difference.

Was Lara Logan raped by the insane mob in Cairo last Friday? Most media are shirking their jobs by a careful tiptoe around that key question. Ask women (or men), and they'll tell you that actual rape is worse than a mauling, even if the beating includes vicious groping. Exactly how much of a sexual assault was it? That matters. If it was actual rape, then the outrage needs to be ratcheted up. Among those not afraid of addressing the question is the New York Post, whose Clemente Lisi reports today:

The separation and assault lasted for roughly 20 to 30 minutes, said a person familiar with the matter, who added that it was "not a rape."

Was it or not? If it was, that would take this horrific act way beyond the pale. Despite what CBS and her family and the pusillanimous media say, the need to know trumps privacy.

Judging by the plucky and blunt Logan's frank talk on Jon Stewart's Daily Show and other venues, she will eventually tell us the details.

And it wouldn't be to satisfy some twisted prurience. It would be because she's blunt and a real reporter unafraid to deliver unpleasant truths. Here she is on Stewart in 2008:

Now, was Logan raped last Friday? The Times's Brian Stelter skirted the question, writing, like almost all the other media, that Logan was "sexually assaulted." Was it rape, or was the sexual component of the vicious attack considerably less than that? Were there chants of "Jew! Jew" (even though she's not Jewish) while she was being attacked? It's also possible that she was sexually assaulted in every which way but rape. Yes, almost as bad, but still not as bad as rape.

Stelter ended his story with dry statistical crap:

The committee, whose board includes Ms. Logan, said Tuesday evening in a statement: "We have seen Lara's compassion at work while helping journalists who have faced brutal aggression while doing their jobs. She is a brilliant, courageous, and committed reporter. Our thoughts are with Lara as she recovers."

There is little information available about instances of sexual assault affecting journalists. In an article for the Columbia Journalism Review in 2007, the writer, Judith Matloff, wrote that foreign correspondents rarely tell anyone, "even when the abuse is rape."

Yes, they rarely tell anyone. But this story is out, so there's no turning away from it. What are the details?


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