Pretty Ladies Discriminated Against for Man-Jobs

Pretty people generally rake in a lot of seemingly undeserved wins in life, but an article in Salon today reveals an intriguing twist in the social expectation: It turns out, if beautiful women are applying for so-called man-jobs, like as car salespeople, mechanical engineers, prison guards, or tow truck drivers, they're more likely to be denied their dreams. A new study from the University of Colorado Denver Business School points out this gender-stereotyping unfairness.

"In these [masculine] professions being attractive was highly detrimental to women," says lead researcher Stefanie Johnson. "This wasn't the case with men which shows that there is still a double standard when it comes to gender."

That's right, the study found that handsome men were "always at an advantage" and "never discriminated against." (We have found this to be true in our own personal research.)

Meanwhile, beautiful women are likely to have more luck with stereotypical girl jobs, like as secretaries, receptionists, or, um, maybe even hot bankers.

But as is true for most of these studies, the questions remain. For example, how many gorgeous women out there are angling for tow-truck driver gigs?

Even if you are one of them, know this before you fall into a pit of beautiful despair: Pretty people still get all sorts of perks, like higher salaries, better performance evaluations, more college acceptances, the best actor/model/triple-threat jobs...and they even have a greater chance at being elected president. All of which may make that tow-truck job seem considerably less appealing.

*As we finished this post we learned that the first woman has been sworn in as the head of a major intelligence agency today. Congrats, Letitia Long!

[via Salon, Daily Mail]

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