Slain NYPD Officer Brian Moore Remembered as a 'Rising Star' in the Department

Members of the NYPD carry Brian Moore's casket on Long Island.
Members of the NYPD carry Brian Moore's casket on Long Island.
Photo by C.S. Muncy for the Village Voice

Thousands of members of the NYPD, joined by fellow officers from around the country, are paying tribute to slain officer Brian Moore, of the 105th Precinct, at a funeral service at Saint James Roman Catholic Church in Seaford, Long Island, today.

The roads surrounding the church are lined with officers who presented arms as the honor guard and casket were escorted into the church. Moore's family and members of his precinct stood at the church steps as the casket was carried.

See also: The NYPD Pay Tribute to Brian Moore at Funeral

Mayor Bill de Blasio and his wife, Chirlane McCray, arrived shortly before the service started, stopping to talk with several officers before moving into the church. Unlike at previous funerals, only around six officers turned their backs to the mayor.

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During his remarks at the funeral, de Blasio said Moore was a "young man but a very great man."

"He learned quickly; he was constantly asking questions," de Blasio said. "It became clear to many he was a rising star. In a few short years he made it to the elite anti-crime unit."

De Blasio complimented Moore's father, Raymond, a retired police sergeant, for bringing his son up a Baltimore Orioles fan — a "different team in the American League East." De Blasio said Moore loved his dog, Smoky, and his copper-black Acura — and making his own homemade karaoke videos.

"But nothing mattered more than his family," de Blasio said. "He loved to spend time with his father. He went to baseball games, he went bowling. He also made sure that every Monday — his day off — was a time he devoted to his mother [Irene]. That was time he kept sacred, to make sure he had that time with her."

In his remarks, Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said Moore was a jokester: "The only photo I've seen of him where he wasn't smiling was his official department photo," Bratton said, to laughter. "And in that photo we tell them not to smile."

Bratton also posthumously promoted Moore to detective, first grade, and presented a badge to a standing ovation.

"The man in the arena for all of us," Bratton said.

The family of late officer Wenjian Liu, also killed in the line of duty, were at the steps of the church and greeted by senior NYPD officials.

A class from Plainedge Elementary sat along the parade route, talking with officers, posing for photos, and holding signs that read, "RIP OFFICER MOORE."

De Blasio made a point of stopping to talk with officers on the way to the church, and seemed to ignore Patrolmen's Benevolent Association chief Pat Lynch entirely.

Moore was shot in the head on Saturday night near 212th Street in Queens Village, when he and another plainclothes officer tried to stop a man who appeared to be adjusting what looked like a gun in his waistband. The man, 35-year-old Demetrius Blackwell, faces a charge of first-degree murder, among others.

Moore's family removed him from life support on Monday. The Times reports he had made more than 150 arrests since joining the NYPD in 2010.

Slain NYPD Officer Brian Moore Remembered as a 'Rising Star' in the Department
Photo
Slain NYPD Officer Brian Moore Remembered as a 'Rising Star' in the Department
Photo by C.S. Muncy for the Village Voice

See also: The NYPD Pay Tribute to Brian Moore at Funeral

Slain NYPD Officer Brian Moore Remembered as a 'Rising Star' in the Department
Photo by C.S. Muncy for the Village Voice
Slain NYPD Officer Brian Moore Remembered as a 'Rising Star' in the Department
Photo by C.S. Muncy for the Village Voice

See also: The NYPD Pay Tribute to Brian Moore at Funeral


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