The People You Date Are the People You Can Date, Science Says

Spoiler: This film has no basis in science.
Spoiler: This film has no basis in science.

Good news for people who date people! Generally, the people you want to date are people who might want to date you, people of the same "desirability" and/or "hotness"! Does this, perhaps, seem sort of untrue based on your recent dating history? Well, that must be because you are choosing people who don't want to date you -- people who are, for lack of a better phrase, "out of your league." That is unnatural, a bastardization of humanity, akin to a duck falling in love with a dog. A scientific study out of the University of California, Berkeley, has determined that, in online dating at least, couples were attracted to each other based on a similar level of attractiveness and social desirability. This is called the "matching hypothesis," or "how the world works, sometimes."

This means two things: Opposites do not attract (even though we're pretty sure that old chestnut has to do with personalities rather than looks), and basically, you date at about the highest levels of what you can get, and vice versa. Also, when online dating, photos are important.

Though there was some fluctuation,

Individuals on the dating market will assess their own self-worth and select partners whose social desirability approximately equals their own.

Using data collected in the laboratory and from users of a popular online dating site, the authors found evidence for matching based on self-worth, physical attractiveness, and popularity, but to different degrees and not always at the same stage of the dating process.

The most striking prediction is that undesirable individuals will choose undesirable partners.

"Undesirable" not applying in that instance, of course.

Opposites attract? Apparently not, according to study [Daily Mail via The Awl]

[JDoll / @thisisjendoll]

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