This Week in the Voice: Andrew Cuomo, Lobbyists Calling

Congrats to the newly elected Governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo. As a welcoming gift, this week's Voice cover story would like to warn you and your constitutions of the various leech-like lobbyists waiting to suck your integrity as a public official dry. The inimitable Wayne Barrett reports in Pecking Order: Andrew Cuomo Goes to Albany, Where Lobbyists Are Waiting.

Elsewhere in News, we're sucking the news cycle dry of its lifeblood and transfusing it to you, our readers:

  • Is there anything more satisfying than watching a pious asshole try to con the world and end up conning himself? Find out as Voice columnist Tom Robbins reports in The Rabbi Who Conned Himself.
  • New York City's aging jazz musicians are legends who have helped give this city some of it's most important sonic makeup. And yet, they're being treated like throwaway geriatrics who mean nothing to nobody by the people who pay them. Nat Hentoff makes the case as to just how wrong this is, as he reports on how Local Nightclubs Need to Stop Resisting Pension Payments for Jazz Musicians.
  • New York City's aging jazz musicians are legends who have helped give this city some of it's most important sonic makeup. And yet, they're being treated like throwaway geriatrics who mean nothing to nobody by the people who pay them. Legendary Voice columnist Nat Hentoff makes the case as to just how wrong this is, as he reports on how Local Nightclubs Need to Stop Resisting Pension Payments for Jazz Musicians.
  • Voice gossip Michael Musto was assaulted by Courtney Love at a recent party. In a good way. Which doesn't necessarily entail a fistful of mescaline, somehow. And yet, he is asked to do the impossible. Must reports on Courtney Love: "Get Me Out of Movie Prison!" Honey, if he can't do it, you're fucked. Straight up.

In Food, we are the vultures who will pick away until there is nothing left but bone, and then we'll request those be fried up for us to eat thereafter:

  • Voice food critic and de facto outer-borough explorer Robert Sietsema makes moves this week all the way out to Flushing, where he finds the rare Henan restaurant in Henan Feng Wei, serving some unfussy food. Do you even know what Henan or unfussy food is? You don't, you philistine. Read Robert's review and become a better person. And then snack on some lamb offal soup to congratulate yourself.

In Film, we are majestic eagles, picking up the fresh fish of the sea in our brilliant talons for you to behold :

  • Young filmmaker Lena Dunham has done more in her decade on this planet than you will in nine of them, if you live that long. But is any of it any good? Chief Voice movie critic J. Hobermann guides you through the hype on Tiny Furniture.
  • Isabelle Huppert Will Not Be Defined. Sounds like the tagline of every other artist talking to a media outlet, right? Find out as Melissa Anderson reports.
  • Todd Haynes' Poison just turned 20. Is it still deadly? Har har. But no, really: Rob Nelson explains how the classic has aged.
  • Elsewhere in film, Tony Scott made a movie about a speeding train with Denzel Washington. It's called Unstoppable, and our reviewer will answer the question as to whether or not it's as unflappably stupid as it sounds. The hardworking Karina Longworth can relate to Rachel McAdams' married-to-her-job character in Morning Glory, but she also knows how to kickback with some Disco and Atomic War, now playing at Cinema Village. Meanwhile, the lady who followed around The Brian Jonestown Massacre for Sundance award-winning doc DIG! now follows around another asshole, a climatologist who makes the lives of the environmentalism movement hell in Cool It. Nick Schrager notes that "Mark Kostabi was a talented artist and a smug, antagonistic douchebag." Of course, a movie had to be made about him, Con Man. Nick Pinkerton takes in a Miserable White Folks movie in Helena From the Wedding, no relation to Margot. Finally, J. Hoberman reminds us that Before There Was MTV, There Was Bruce Conner.

In Arts, we are parakeets having the sheets pulled on and off our cages, and we want to know how it makes YOU feel:

  • Theater: Michael Feingold knocks out a triple, checking out the new plays of Lisa Kron and Will Eno, and seeing Kander and Ebb hit Broadway. In the Wake, Middletown, and Scottsboro Boys all get reviewed. Meanwhile, Tom Sellar watches an assault on the liberal intelligentsia at The Public Theater in Richard Nelson's That Hopey Changey Thing -- which will likely only be seen by the liberal intelligentsia -- and then writes a review for the Village Voice about it. Love it. Also, Václav Havel's 1965 play The Memorandum gets a re-staging and Electra in a One-Piece moves the Greek tragedy into the digital realm.
  • Dance: Belgians and Germans and moving bodies! At least everyone gets where they're going on time. Literally. Deborah Jowitt checks out the Rhineland Rock of moves made by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui and Sasha Waltz.
  • Art: Finally, Christian Viveros-Fauné sees Luc Tuymans: 'Corporate'. In it, there is a painting of a speaking panel. When this civilization is overrun by aliens, I want them to see that, and understand why people hate each other.

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All that, plus more Music, Art, Theater, Film, Books, Dance, Restaurants, Michael Musto, Free Will Astrology, and Dan Savage. And then some.

Here at the Voice, we hear everyone calling -- Lobbyists, London, Publicists -- and we don't really care. Or maybe we do but we're just avoiding your call. In fact, that's more likely.

[fkamer@villagevoice.com]


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