For a long, time the common lament among fans of contemporary black American film was that much of the most popular fare—that which had a life beyond film festivals and garnered welcome but useless critical acclaim—lacked real ideas, and that it too often was absent knowledge and mastery of the basic fact that film is a visual medium, and the visuals matter. Not a lot has changed in that regard. Much of what goes “pop” is still both aesthetically anemic and soft on ideas. (To be fair, that’s a charge that can be made against most mainstream American... More >>>