Make Daniel Angerer's Wiener Schnitzel, From Klee Brasserie

It's icky out. Make wiener schnitzel.
It's icky out. Make wiener schnitzel.

Daniel Angerer has had a busy year: He had a baby, made headlines with his wife's breast milk cheese, and started releasing details about his forthcoming sausage-centric restaurant. Today, he warms us up with a recipe for wiener schnitzel, just as he makes it at Klee Brasserie.

"I had schnitzel on my menu only on Saturdays and guests kept asking me to make it an everyday item," he tells Fork in the Road. "I finally gave in, and it is currently offered with house-made potato chips and pea shoot salad. Schnitzel is terrific when made in the right way -- pan-souffléed, moving the skillet back and forth so that the hot oil slowly cooks the top and air is sealed in between the meat and breading. This makes it airy and puffy. This is nostalgic food that brings me back to my childhood, as my grandmother cooked it this way. Most importantly, it tastes delicious."

Wiener Schnitzel

Yield: 4

Ingredients: 4 slices veal or 1 1/4 pound, top-round or loin (can substitute chicken breast) 3 eggs salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 1 cup flour 2 cups fine-ground bread crumbs 2 cups canola oil

With a meat hammer, pound the veal slices gently to double their size, until they're 1/8-inch thin, then season with salt and pepper. Prepare three shallow plates: the first filled with flour, the second with beaten eggs, and the third with bread crumbs. Dip the flattened veal into flour on all sides then transfer to the eggs, and lastly into the bread crumbs, shaking off excessive breading.

In a skillet over medium heat, heat the oil, then cook the breaded meat. The meat should be happily sizzling when lowered into the hot oil. Do not crowd the skillet; instead, work in batches. Move the skillet carefully back and forth over the flame. Cook the meat until golden in color on the bottom, then turn with kitchen tongs over to brown other side. Transfer the cooked schnitzel to a paper-lined plate to absorb the excess oil. Serve with tender lettuce, such as Boston, or a hearty potato salad dressed with mustard vinaigrette.

Have a restaurant tip or other food-related news? Send it to fork@villagevoice.com.


Sponsor Content

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send:

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >