The Ten Best Bowls of Ramen in NYC

The Ten Best Bowls of Ramen in NYC
Sara Ventiera for the Village Voice

Few things are more satisfying on a cold winter's day than a steaming-hot bowl of broth. Some are more exciting than others; unless you're sick at home, few of us are getting worked up over a cup of chicken noodle. Ramen, the dorm room staple, on the other hand, has now reached a level of popularity that was once unimaginable. With new ramen joints sprouting up across the city on a near daily basis, though, it's hard to determine which ones are worth the two-hour-plus waits. We've scoured the city to find the ten best ramens in NYC.

The Ten Best Bowls of Ramen in NYC
Sara Ventiera for the Village Voice

YUJI Ramen (150 Ainslie Street, Brooklyn; 646-262-1358)

It started as a pop-up inside Williamsburg Japanese breakfast-and-lunch joint Okonomi. But YUJI has turned itself into a complete ramen-ya in the evenings. The tiny space — there are a total of twelve seats — features a truly unique array of product. The Ankimo Miso Ramen ($17) is a perfect example. Noodles swim in a creamy monkfish liver broth with torched squid and bitter dandelion greens. It's so far from any other version around; kind of weird, but it tastes like you're eating the ocean.

The Ten Best Bowls of Ramen in NYC
Sara Ventiera for the Village Voice

Tabata Ramen's Tabata (540 Ninth Avenue; 212-290-7691)

As far from traditional as you may be able to find — which is what ramen is supposed to be all about — but definitely worth a try, Tabata's ($10.50) namesake dish intertwines its owner, Linn San Maung's, Burmese roots with his eleven years spent working in Japan. The broth is made with a combination of soybean and coconut, which is then topped with spicy chicken, red onions, flavored egg, and cilantro. If you're looking for an exotic take on ramen, this is your spot.

The Ten Best Bowls of Ramen in NYC
Photo courtesy Ivan Ramen Facebook page

Ivan Ramen's (25 Clinton Street; 646-678-3859) Spicy Red Chile Ramen

Long Island native Ivan Orkin has been steadily garnering international acclaim for combining his Jewish heritage with his Japanophile tendencies. Making his name at his ramen shops just outside Tokyo, he has plenty of ramen cred. Back on his home turf, the noodle impresario is a hot commodity. And his hottest selection is the spicy red chile ramen ($15). The crimson-hued broth is flavored with dashi and chicken broth, then filled with minced pork, rye noodles, and a smashed egg.

Momofuku Noodle Bar's (171 First Avenue; 212-777-7773) Momofuku Ramen

David Chang is known for a lot of things. The explosion of ramen in the States is probably his biggest accomplishment thus far. The handful of noodle dishes available at his East Village spot are all worthy of applause. But, as is the case with most signature dishes, the Momofuku Ramen is the star here. Luscious dark broth, succulent pork, crisp seaweed, squishy egg: There's a reason this dish inspired an international trend.



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