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The 2013 New York Film Festival

The Village Voice's coverage of the 51st annual New York Film Festival, with essays and reviews of Inside Llewyan Davis, Captain Phillips, All is Lost and more.

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  1. The Invisible Woman: Ralph Fiennes' Magnificent Dickensian Tale of Secret Love and Loss
    Review
    Discarding the Greengrass-ian shaky cam of his directorial debut, 2011's Coriolanus, Ralph Fiennes employs a magnificently classical touch for The Invisible Woman.
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  2. Bastards: Mood Only Goes So Far in Denis' Latest Oblique Odyssey
    Review
    Claire Denis douses Bastards in her usual oblique dreaminess, equal parts romantic and malevolent, yet that style can't fully compensate for a tale that, underneath its gorgeous aesthetic affectations, proves frustratingly undercooked.
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  3. 12 Years a Slave: A Masterful Historical Nightmare of Malice and Resolve
    Review
    A spiritual companion piece to Schindler's List in its portrait of rare triumph amidst catastrophic tragedy.
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  4. Ben Stiller Dreams Big with The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
    Review
    As the dutiful yet outmoded "negative asset manager" in the photo department of the soon-folding Life magazine, Walter is a virtually invisible drone with an overactive imagination.
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  5. Abuse of Weakness is Brilliant, Maddening, Unlikeable
    Review
    French filmmaker Catherine Breillat knows all kinds of ways to get under people's skin.
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  6. Garrel's Jealousy Is Like a Good Haiku
    Review
    Jealousy works because it's not trying to do too much.
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  7. Tim's Vermeer: Art and Tech Collide in Awe-Inspiring Historical Whodunit
    Review
    A suspenseful non-fiction investigation into the artistic process, Tim's Vermeer charts the unlikely odyssey of Tim Jenison, a man fascinated with the paintings of 17th century Dutch master Johan Vermeer.
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  8. Omar Is a Thriller Less Interested in Thrilling Than in Preaching
    Review
    A screed is a screed no matter its superficial genre trappings, as evidenced by Hany Abu-Assad's Omar.
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  9. Inside Llewyn Davis: The Coen Brothers' Most Moving Film Since A Serious Man
    Review
    Inside Llewyn Davis finds the Coen brothers in a dark mood, exploring the near-inevitable disappointment that faces artists too sincere to compromise--disappointments that the Coens, to their credit, have made a career out of dodging.
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  10. Captain Phillips is a Hokey High Seas Drama Apt to Turn Stomachs and Elicit Groans
    Review
    Paul Greengrass' cinema-of-spasticity reaches new phony lows with Captain Phillips, a based-on-true-life 2008 tale of a cargo ship captain (Tom Hanks) who finds his vessel attacked by Somali pirates led by Muse (Barkhad Abdi).
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2 comments
richardbelloart
richardbelloart

Wishing I could go to all ! Saludos from Puerto Rico !

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